Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a custom class to hold three vertex positions that define a triangle to draw and subdivide. The problem I'm running into is how to make sure I return the correct values.

here's the code that I have so far:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Graphics;

namespace Icosahedron_Test
{
    class TriXYZ
    {
        Vector3 vertex1;
        Vector3 vertex2;
        Vector3 vertex3;
        int depth;
        float material; // float because the material can be part grass / part dirt or part sand / part rock, etc...  for blending

        public TriXYZ(Vector3 pos1, Vector3 pos2, Vector3 pos3, int tDepth)
        {
            vertex1 = pos1;
            vertex2 = pos2;
            vertex3 = pos3;
            depth = tDepth;
        }

        public TriXYZ(Vector3 pos1, Vector3 pos2, Vector3 pos3, int tDepth, float tMaterial)
        {
            vertex1 = pos1;
            vertex2 = pos2;
            vertex3 = pos3;
            depth = tDepth;
            material = tMaterial;
        }

        public Vector3 Vertex1(TriXYZ triangle)
        {
            return vertex1;
        }
        public Vector3 Vertex2(TriXYZ triangle)
        {
            return vertex2;
        }
        public Vector3 Vertex3(TriXYZ triangle)
        {
           return vertex3;
        }
        public int Depth(TriXYZ triangle)
        {
            return depth;
        }
        public Vector3 Midpoint(Vector3 pos1, Vector3 pos2, int tDepth)
        {
            Vector3 midpoint;  // returned midpoint between the two inputted vectors

            //PLACEHOLDER

            return midpoint;
        }

    }
}

I create a new Triangle element like this:

new TriXYZ(pos1, pos2, pos3, depth); // the depth will deal with LOD later on

so, in order to get the value for the vertex positions, I'm calling the class like this:

vertex1 = TriXYZ.Vertex1(verticiesList[listPos]);

My issue is that I'm not sure if it's working, and I'm not entirely sure how to check it at this point, because there's not enough here to actually make the program run. Does the theory behind this seem like it would work?

Also, as a side note, I'm an amateur programmer, so if there are any glaring issues with this that are going against coding standards, feel free to point them out to me ^^

share|improve this question
1  
You should start accepting some of the answers to your other questions or people will be less inclined to help you. See here: stackoverflow.com/faq#howtoask –  Jason Down Jul 19 '11 at 2:51
    
This is a good time to write unit tests –  Robert Levy Jul 19 '11 at 2:53
    
interesting, I'd missed that before. Thank you for pointing that out to me, I'll be sure to do that. And I'll have to look up what unit tests are..... –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 2:53
    
@Patrick Reynolds: Just google unit testing in .net or look for tutorials with NUnit... that should get you started. Lots of examples out there. –  Jason Down Jul 19 '11 at 3:06
    
much obliged, but will .net work with c# and XNA? –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 3:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm assuming what you want are getters for those vertex variables.

This is because you should not try to make those functions static (from the way you're trying to call them), do the following instead:

public Vector3 Vertex1()
{
    return vertex1;
}
public Vector3 Vertex2()
{
    return vertex2;
}
public Vector3 Vertex3()
{
    return vertex3;
}

If what you really want are getters, then I'd recommend getting a more explicit name like GetVertex1, or even better, put it as a property like so:

public Vector3 Vertex1 { get; private set; }

So, what exactly is a property? It's just a nicer way to get or set data.

Here, we specify public to be the access level of the vertex, so that Vertex1 can be accessed publicly (you can get the value of the vertex outside of the class). Like so:

Vector3 vertex = triangle.Vertex1;

In this particular situation, you may or may not want other people from outside of the class to change the vertex. If you don't want them to change it, you specify the setter of the property to be private, so that you can only change Vertex1's value within the class.

You'd use it this way:

TriXYZ myTriangle = new TriXYZ(pos1, pos2, pos3, depth);
Vector3 vertex1 = myTriangle.Vertex1;
share|improve this answer
    
so, if I'm drawing from a list of triangles, then I need to assign the value in the list to a variable, then do: variable.Vertex1(); and that will return my value? –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 2:56
    
If you want to access the position of a vertex from a triangle (from a list or whatever), you'd just do triangle.Vertex1 to access it (if you are using properties like I suggested in my new edit). –  Jesse Emond Jul 19 '11 at 2:59
    
Thank you very much, pretty sure that's exactly what I needed. –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 3:00
    
could you explain this to me: public Vector3 Vertex1 { get; private set; } Like I said, I'm new at this, and this confuses me a bit. I've seen it a couple of times in the books I have, but I've never come across an actual explanation of what this is or what it does. –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 3:14
    
Oh sure! Give me a couple of minutes to edit my post to give a better explanation than with comments. –  Jesse Emond Jul 19 '11 at 3:35

Try looking at this C# Source file. It is doing essentially what your trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, interesting. Thanks for that link, it has a lot of what I'm looking to do. what does this mean: #region Properties, does it define a portion of code, or is it just for documenting? –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 3:02
    
@Patrick -- No, what it does is, if you are using Visual Studio, it creates a collapsable region of code. You can ignore it. Its just to make the code look better in Visual Studio –  icemanind Jul 19 '11 at 3:43
    
ah, useful. I'll keep that in mind since I'm using visual studio ^^ –  Patrick Reynolds Jul 19 '11 at 3:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.