Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to find the best way to define models for team / member / person, where a person can be a member of many teams and a team can have many members. Along with the "member" relationship is the position which the person fills for the team. A team should also have exactly one head coach and one assistant coach. A person could be a head/assistant coach for more than one team.

Below is my current (futile) attempt:

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :people, :through => :members
  belongs_to :head_coach :class => 'Person' 
  belongs_to :assistant_coach :class => 'Person'
end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :teams
  has_many :teams, :through => :members
end

class Member < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :team
  belongs_to :person
  # has a "position" which is a string
end

This approach is causing me two problems:

  1. The Team's belongs_to :head_coach and :assistant_coach doesn't work. Maybe it should be a has_one, but then I'm not sure it makes sense to put the belongs_to in Person (I want a FK in Team to Person). The example below shows that how I have it set-up doesn't jive with ActiveRecord:

    irb(main):006:0> t = Team.find(1)
    => #<Team id: 1, name: "Champs", created_at: "2011-07-18 01:50:56", updated_at: "2011-07-19 01:47:26", head_coach: nil> 
    irb(main):007:0> t.head_coach
    => nil
    irb(main):008:0> t.head_coach = Person.find(1)
    => #<Person id: 1, name: "Chris", created_at: "2011-07-18 01:52:34", updated_at: "2011-07-18 01:52:34">
    irb(main):009:0> t.save
    => true
    irb(main):010:0> t.head_coach
    => #<Person id: 1, name: "Chris", created_at: "2011-07-18 01:52:34", updated_at: "2011-07-18 01:52:34">
    irb(main):011:0> Team.find(1).head_coach
    => nil
    
  2. The has_many :through seems to work but I haven't found a good way to list the positions for each person within a team. This is my current attempt within a view:

    <% @team.people.each do |person| %>
      <%= person.name +" "+ @team.members.find_by_person_id(person).position %>
    

Is there an overall better approach to representing these relationships?

Thanks for the help!

-Chris

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up going with the following approach using the explicit foreign_key which is working OK.

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :people, :through => :members
  belongs_to :head_coach, :class => 'Person', :foreign_key head_coach_id 
  belongs_to :assistant_coach, :class => 'Person', :foreign_key assistant_coach_id
end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :teams, :through => :members

end

class Member < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :team
  belongs_to :person
  # has a "position" which is a string
end

The only downside to date is I haven't been able to get the foreign keys to load automatically in the controller. I need to add code such as the following in order to save the associations:

# POST /teams
def create
  @team = Team.new
  @team.head_coach = Person.find(params[:head_coach])
  @team.assistant_coach = Person.find(params[:assistant_coach])

  ....
share|improve this answer

Could you have a boolean field for head_coach and assistant_coach in your members table and use a validate unique rule with a scope.

EG Add to members table

is_head_coach:boolean
is_assistant_coach:boolean 

Now in your member model have

validates_uniqueness_of :is_head_coach, :scope => [:team_id, :person_id]
validates_uniqueness_of :is_assistant_coach, :scope => [:team_id, :person_id]

Then you could use some named scopes in your person model or team model to find the head_coach.

As for listing all the positions couldn't you use:

@team.members.each do |member|
   "#{member.person.name} #{member.position}"

If you want to sort them in a specific way maybe you could add a field called sort_order:integer to the members table and sort by that.

Update:

I take your point that this solution above is not scalable. What about if you use the position field in your member model and create a scope aka 'named scope' for it like the following:

scope :head_coach, lambda { where('position = 'head coach') }

Then you could use something like:

team.members.head_coach

You could go even further with this scope

scope :get_position, lambda{|pos| where('position = ?', pos)}

and use

team.members.get_position('head_coach')

You could write a custom validate method to check that you end up with on head_coach per team, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Regarding the first portion, I was intending to scale it up so that it would also have a couple more ("n") roles such as pitching coach, batting coach, base coach, manager etc... I like the scope suggestion but I wonder how it will scale if I end up with many different roles? –  krsyoung Jul 20 '11 at 1:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.