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I loved Loki's C++ HierarchyGenerator and want to do the same in C#.

What I want in the end is a class that has a virtual function per argument in a given typelist.

C++ code I'd like to convert:

template <class T>
class SenderV 
{
public: 
    virtual void Send(T t) = 0;
};
template <int i>
class Foo // Just to make it easy to show typelist, it's not interesting. 
{ /* doIt definition */ };
typedef TYPELIST_2(Foo<1>,Foo<2>) FooSendables;

template <typename TList=FooSendables>
class FooSend : public Loki::GenScatterHierarchy <TList,SenderV>
{
public:
    void Send(Foo<1> f) {f.doIt();std::cout<<"Sending Foo1."<<std::endl;};
    void Send(Foo<2> f) {f.doIt();std::cout<<"Sending Foo2."<<std::endl;};
};

in C#. If you aren't familiar with Loki, the FooSend class above would default to:

class FooSend : SenderV<Foo<1> >, SenderV<Foo<2> >//including every type in TList
{ /*... as above */};

But when a new TList is given, it'd be a different Hierarchy based on the Types in the TList.

I'm also interested in a GenLinearHierarchy in Loki if it exists out there.

I could always try to translate between the languages, but I'm not a big fan of trying that as I'm new to C# and just want to do my work, not learn the subtle difference between templates and generics.

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2 Answers 2

I have no idea of Loki but it looks for me that you use multiple inheritance. c# does not support multiple inheritance and what I have learned many years working with c# is that I do not miss it.

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The LinearHierarchy is not multiple inheritance (it is a line of inheritance -- in the above example, it'd be FooSend : FooSend<Sender<1> >, where FooSend<Sender<1> > : FooSend<Sender<2> >) –  Dale Jul 19 '11 at 15:28
    
But a C#y way to do ScatterHierarchy is to have everything above, but with interfaces of SenderV<Foo<1> >, SenderV<Foo<2> > in place of the class inheritance. The point is to describe a class as a "Sender" of types Foo<1> -- Foo<n> I expect to have ~20 classes (Foo<1> through Foo<20>) that I'd like to put in the TypeList, and I'd like to have a number of classes that follow this pattern, all with slightly different typelists (that are mergeable), so it's not pure laziness pushing me toward this route. –  Dale Jul 19 '11 at 15:40
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

using t4:

<#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="false" language="C#" #>
<#@ output extension=".cs" #>

<#@ import namespace="System.Text" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.IO" #>
<#@ import namespace="System" #>


namespace SomeNamespace 
{

    public interface Sender<T> 
    {
        void Send<T>(T t);
    };
    <# string[] strings={"Foo1","Foo2","Foo3"};
        foreach (String node in strings) 
        { #> partial class <#= node #> {}
        <# } #>
    class z {}
    public class FooSend: Sender<z><# 
         foreach (String node in strings) 
         { #>, Sender<<#= node #>> <# } #>
    {
    }
}

I can't get the formatting the way I'd like (and, regardless, the t4 formatting is always going to be ugly), but this solves my problem.

The code above produces:

namespace SomeNamespace 
{

    public interface Sender<T> 
    {
        void Send<T>(T t);
    };
     partial class Foo1 {}
     partial class Foo2 {}
     partial class Foo3 {}
     class z {}
    public class ParentClass : Sender<z>, Sender<Foo1> , Sender<Foo2> , Sender<Foo3>  {
    }    
}

Which fits my needs.

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