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I have a struct that I use to build a linked list as below;

struct my_struct{
    char a[16];
    struct my_struct *next;
}

I free that linked list by below function;

void free_my_list(struct my_struct* recv) {

     if (recv->next != NULL)
         free_my_list(recv->next);

     free(recv);
     recv = NULL;
}

In my program, I use a struct _my_list over and over but free and malloc it every time as below:

struct my_struct *_my_list;

free_my_list(_my_list);
_my_list = (my_list *) malloc(sizeof(my_list));
_my_list->next = NULL;

Every time I fill the list, I print char arrays and then reset _my_struct by above code. Above code works fine on Ubuntu pc, but on Cent OS after printing first list(after first malloc _my_struct) correctly, following list are printed as corrupted data.

When I don't free and malloc memory during whole program execution it works fine in Cent OS too but I should reset list _my_list between printf() calls.

_my_list is filled and printed via below functions;

/*prints every item in my_list*/
void print_my_list(struct my_struct *recv, FILE *fd) {

   my_list *tmp;
   tmp = recv;

   while (tmp != NULL) {
       if (fwrite(tmp->a, 1, strlen(tmp->a), fd) == -1) {
               pritnf("error\n");
        }
       tmp = tmp->next;
   }
}

/*Add 'a' string to _my_list*/
void add_recv_to_list(struct my_struct **recv_list, char *recv) {

struct my_struct *tmp;
tmp = *recv_list;

if (*recv_list == NULL) {
    *recv_list = (struct my_struct *) malloc(sizeof(struct my_struct));
    tmp = *recv_list;

} else {

    while ((tmp->next) != NULL) {
        tmp = tmp->next;
    }
    tmp->next = (struct my_struct *) malloc(sizeof(struct my_struct));
    tmp = tmp->next;

}
strncpy(tmp->a, recv, MAX_NAME_LEN);
tmp->next = NULL;
}

What can be the reason, any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
I think you'll need to show the code that fills the list. Also, is my_list a struct my_struct? –  Michael Burr Jul 19 '11 at 6:32
    
Post your full sample. You are missing a typedef or a few structs –  Foo Bah Jul 19 '11 at 6:33
1  
how do you populate the list. Also recv = NULL in the free list function does nothing. You be better to pass my_struct** so that you can clear the list pointer from inside that routine. –  David Heffernan Jul 19 '11 at 6:34
    
normally you'll loop until the current element's next is NULL, I'd rather want to know how you add elements to the list. My guess is that it works by chance, i.e. the last element's next is NULL. –  LeleDumbo Jul 19 '11 at 6:38
    
I don't quite understand the question, perhaps you need to show more code. In your sample it looks like the first call to free_my_list will be made with an unitialised argument - but I doubt that's what you a really doing. –  Adrian Ratnapala Jul 19 '11 at 6:38

1 Answer 1

I think that your problem may start here:

struct my_struct *_my_list;

free_my_list(_my_list);
_my_list = (my_list *) malloc(sizeof(my_list));
_my_list->next = NULL;

When you initialize the struc: struct my_struct *_my_list; you don't assign it any value, so it holds whatever garbage data was in memory beforehand. When you free() that in free_my_list, the behavior is undefined (you are freeing something that you never malloc()ed - so the result may very well be corruption of something or other later on. Try changing your declaration to: struct my_struct *_my_list = NULL; (always a good practice to initialize pointers to NULL, anyway) and changing your free_my_list function to:

void free_my_list(struct my_struct* recv) {
    if (recv == NULL)
         return;

     if (recv->next != NULL)
         free_my_list(recv->next);

     free(recv);
     recv = NULL;
}
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