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I want to select distinct values in a database. Let me run you through a quick example.

Table:

foo bar
--- ---
a   c
c   f
d   a
c   a
f   c
a   c
d   a
a   c
c   a
f   c

Right, let's say my SQL is SELECT DISTINCT foo, bar from table. These are my results:

foo bar
--- ---
a   c
c   f
d   a
c   a
f   c

However the problem is is that there are repetitions of a c / c a just that they are in a different order. I don't want to select these, I want distinct values from both columns, please help!

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1  
Is this a question that you have been asked in some interview. :P –  Talha Ahmed Khan Jul 19 '11 at 9:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

very very wicked & evil:

select distinct
    least(foo, bar) as value1
  , greatest(foo, bar) as value2
from table
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11  
MIN() and MAX() are aggregating functions. You meant LEAST() and GREATEST() probably. –  Mchl Jul 19 '11 at 9:20
1  
thanks for pointing to this g +1 from me –  nabuchodonossor Jul 19 '11 at 9:31
    
@ypercube: thanks for editing –  nabuchodonossor Jul 19 '11 at 14:07
2  
This request is evil. foo can be in value1 as well as in value2. (Just tested it) –  smsteel Mar 21 '13 at 9:42

How about using GROUP BY?

SELECT foo,bar FROM my_table GROUP BY foo,bar

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This is by far the better solution! –  Dominique Feb 20 at 16:17

How about :

SELECT DISTINCT a.foo,a.bar FROM table a
LEFT JOIN table b ON a.foo=b.bar and a.bar=b.foo
WHERE foo IS NULL AND bar IS NULL
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I think MySQL is not having MINUS operator. –  Jatin Dhoot Jul 19 '11 at 9:21
    
no way....hang on then, can easily convert to a join.... –  Kevin Burton Jul 19 '11 at 9:24
    
Yup, I thought there is some equivalent of MINUS in MySQL which you might be aware of :) –  Jatin Dhoot Jul 19 '11 at 9:26
    
@KevinBurton foo and bar in WHERE clause are ambiguous –  V_B Mar 26 at 14:06

You're asking for something that's the opposite of a symmetric closure (I don't know if it has a special name; antisymmetric something, since it's not a closure). For closures and closure like things where you need to compare two different columns, you can use joins. To make sure you don't filter out both rows when they are duplicated across columns, you need to a way to differentiate the repeats and include one of them, such as by including the pair where the first is the lesser.

SELECT DISTINCT t1.foo, t1.bar
  FROM `table` t1
    LEFT JOIN `table` t2
      ON t1.foo=t2.bar AND t1.bar=t2.foo 
  WHERE t2.foo IS NULL OR t1.foo <= t1.bar;
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I'm trying to do something similar to the OP. Is there a link to a good tutorial and explanation available? Since we're not sure on the terminology I'm struggling to locate on on the net. –  djskinner Nov 23 '12 at 15:40
SELECT DISTINCT foo, bar FROM table WHERE
CONCAT(',',foo,bar,) NOT IN ( SELECT CONCAT(',',bar,foo) FROM table )
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   SELECT 
       foo, bar
   FROM tableX
   WHERE foo <= bar
 UNION 
   SELECT 
       bar, foo
   FROM tableX
   WHERE bar < foo
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This works for me:

SELECT DISTINCT
LEAST(sub.foo, sub.bar) as value_1
, GREATEST(sub.foo, sub.bar) as value_2

FROM
(SELECT
a.foo
,a.bar
FROM
table a
JOIN
table b
on a.foo = b.bar
and a.bar = b.foo) sub
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