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I have to compare few characters of string say from 2nd char till 4th character( counting starts from zero)
The string is stored in elements of structure say zoopla->real
for example zoopla ->real has '447889036' where real is of type char real[20];
Also please note I cant use function strnstr.

The code works as expected but just for curiousity, I have added printf statement and it shows me value till 4th cahr and then some garabe characters.
I want to know why the printf statment is showing 2 extra garabe values?

char * copyTemp;                   
char *strptr;           
copyTemp = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*6);           

strncpy(copyTemp, zoopla->real, 5);              
printf("the string copied is %s", copyTemp); // debug statemnt            
strptr = strstr(copyTemp, "666");           

if(strptr != NULL)              
{         
//some other function        
}        
else        
//some other function             
free(copyTemp);               

All criticism and suggestions are welcome

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Can you show us what zoopla->real's value is? –  rzetterberg Jul 19 '11 at 11:30
    
Why are you mallocing copyTemp rather than just char copyTemp[6] = {0,0,0,0,0,0};? That takes care of zero-initializing it, too. –  Kerrek SB Jul 19 '11 at 11:32
    
@Kerrek SB copyTemp[6] = {0} will be enough right ? or he can use calloc –  Vivek Goel Jul 19 '11 at 11:33
    
@Vivek: Err.. I'm not sure if missing array members get zeroed, so I wanted to be certain and explicit. calloc is possible, but my point was why put six bytes on the heap and cause a headache... –  Kerrek SB Jul 19 '11 at 11:34
    
I know i can use char without malloc but was just curious to use malloc. any harm in that? –  samprat Jul 19 '11 at 11:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

see http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strncpy/ No null-character is implicitly appended to the end of destination, so destination will only be null-terminated if the length of the C string in source is less than num.

you have to add null your self.

if you will be allocating memory of constant size then use array only.

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <string.h>

int main ()
{
 char * copyTemp;                   
char *strptr;           
copyTemp = (char *)calloc(sizeof(char),6);           

strncpy(copyTemp, "88666782921", 5);              
printf("the string copied is %s", copyTemp); // debug statemnt            
strptr = strstr(copyTemp, "666");           

if(strptr != NULL)              
{         
//some other function        
}        
else        
//some other function             
free(copyTemp);        
return 0;  
}
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Thanks Vivek, that clear my doubts –  samprat Jul 19 '11 at 12:05

It seems to me that copyTemp is not null terminated. That's why printf shows you garbage characters after the characters you put in there. It doesn't know where to stop so it continues iterate through memory.

Add

copyTemp[5] = '\0';

after strncpy.

See this example from the documentation of strncpy:

/* strncpy example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main ()
{
  char str1[]= "To be or not to be";
  char str2[6];
  strncpy (str2,str1,5);
  str2[5]='\0';
  puts (str2);
  return 0;
}
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I guess ur solution is right. –  samprat Jul 19 '11 at 11:48
    
Thanks a lot.... –  samprat Jul 19 '11 at 11:48

According to my old K&R, strncpy will only implicitly add null bytes if the source string has fewer characters than the number to be copied.

In this case, zoopla->real has more than 5 characters, so the function is simply copying the first five characters. Since you haven't initialized the memory to zero, or explicitly added a null byte, the string is not terminated after the fifth character. So when you print the string, you get additional bytes with essentially random values, until one is hit that happens to be zero.

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