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I have used this tutorial to make a website, but I would like that only one user is allowed to be logged in at any time.

I suppose this change should be made in Login.pm which I have included, but I can't figure out where to put in this limitation.

Update

Based on scorpio17's solution I now have that only one user can be logged in, if the user remembers to click log out.

The problem now is how the $can_login state is changed when the session times out.

Here is the updated functions.

sub logout : Runmode {
    my $self = shift;
    if ($self->authen->username) {
    $self->authen->logout;
    $self->session->delete; # Delete current session
    }

    # get state of can_login file
    my $file = "lock-can_login.txt";
    open my $fh, '+<', $file or die "can't open $file in update mode: $!\n";
    flock($fh, LOCK_EX) or die "couldn't get lock: $!\n";

    # 1 means a new user can login
    my $can_login = <$fh>;
    chomp $can_login;

    # allow others to login now
    $can_login = !$can_login;

    # write
    seek $fh, 0, 0;
    print $fh "$can_login\n";
    truncate($fh, tell($fh));
    close $fh;

    return $self->redirect($self->query->url);
}

sub one_user {
    my $self = shift;

    # get state of can_login file
    my $file = "lock-can_login.txt";
    open my $fh, '+<', $file or die "can't open $file in update mode: $!\n";
    flock($fh, LOCK_EX) or die "couldn't get lock: $!\n";

    # 1 means a new user can login
    my $can_login = <$fh>;
    chomp $can_login;

    if ($self->authen->is_authenticated && $can_login) {
    # prevent others from logging in
    $can_login = !$can_login;
    } else {
    $self->authen->logout;
    #and redirect them to a page saying "there can be only one!"
    }

    # write
    seek $fh, 0, 0;
    print $fh "$can_login\n";
    truncate($fh, tell($fh));
    close $fh;
}

Can anyone figure this out?

package MyLib::Login;

use strict;

#use lib '/usr/lib/perl5/vendor_perl/5.8.8/';

use base 'CGI::Application';

# shorter URLs
# extract the desired run mode from the PATH_INFO environment variable.
use CGI::Application::Plugin::AutoRunmode;

# wrapper for DBI
#use CGI::Application::Plugin::DBH(qw/dbh_config dbh/);

# a wrapper around CGI::Session.
# maintain state from one page view to the next (provides persistent data).
use CGI::Application::Plugin::Session;

# logging in and out.
# Authentication allows to identify individual users.
use CGI::Application::Plugin::Authentication;

# external redirects in CGI::Application
use CGI::Application::Plugin::Redirect;

# read parameters from config file
use CGI::Application::Plugin::ConfigAuto(qw/cfg/);

# encrypt passphrases
use Digest::MD5 qw(md5_hex);

# authenticate against NIS/LDAP server
use Authen::Simple::LDAP;


sub setup {
    my $self = shift;

    $self->mode_param(
    path_info => 1,         # tell CGI::Application to parse the PATH_INFO environment variable
    param     => 'rm',
    );
}

# most of the initialization is done here
sub cgiapp_init {
    my $self = shift;

    # read config file and store name-value pairs in %CFG
    my %CFG = $self->cfg;

    # where to look for templete files
    $self->tmpl_path(['./templates']);

    # save session data in mysql
    $self->session_config(
    # store sessions in /tmp as files
    CGI_SESSION_OPTIONS => [ "driver:File", $self->query, {Directory=>'/tmp'} ],

    DEFAULT_EXPIRY => '+10m',   # default expiration time for sessions
    );

    # configure authentication parameters
    $self->authen->config(
    DRIVER => [ 'Authen::Simple::LDAP',
            host   => 'ldaps://nms.imm.dtu.dk/dc=ldap,dc=imm,dc=dtu,dc=dk',
            basedn => 'OU=people,DC=ldap,DC=imm,DC=dtu,DC=dk',
    ],

    STORE                => 'Session',          # save login state inside a session
                                                    # If a user is not logged in, but tries to access a
                                                    # protected page, the Authentication plugin will
                                                    # automatically redirect the user to the login page.
                                                    # Once the user enters a valid username and
                                                    # passsword, they get redirected back to the
                                                    # protected page they originally requested.
    LOGOUT_RUNMODE       => 'logout',           # method to use for logging out when session expires

# uncomment the next 3 lines to enable custom build login prompt
#   LOGIN_RUNMODE        => 'login',
#   POST_LOGIN_RUNMODE   => 'okay',             # run mode that gets called after a user successfully logs in
                                                    # figures out which run mode (page) the user really wanted to
                                                    # see, then redirects the browser to that page using http
                                                    # (not https).

#   RENDER_LOGIN         => \&my_login_form,    # generate a login form. Authentication plugin comes with a default 
    );

    # define runmodes (pages) that require successful login:
    # The Login.pm module doesn't define any content - all of the actual web pages are in Simple.pm.
    # 'mustlogin' page is a place-holder. It's a dummy page that forces you to login, but immediately redirects
    # you back to the default start page (usually the index page).
    $self->authen->protected_runmodes('mustlogin');
}


# define mustlogin runmode
sub mustlogin : Runmode {
    my $self = shift;
    my $url = $self->query->url;
    return $self->redirect($url);
}


# switch from https to http. It assumes that the target run mode is stored in a cgi parameter named
# 'destination', but if for some reason this is not the case, it will default back to the index page.
sub okay : Runmode {
    my $self = shift;

    my $url = $self->query->url;
#  my $user = $self->authen->username;
    my $dest = $self->query->param('destination') || 'index';

    if ($url =~ /^https/) {
    $url =~ s/^https/http/;
    }

    return $self->redirect("$url/$dest");
}

# displays the login form
# But first, it checks to make sure you're not already logged in, and second, it makes sure you're connecting with https. If you try to access the login page with http, it will automatically redirect you using https.
sub login : Runmode {
    my $self = shift;
    my $url = $self->query->url;

    my $user = $self->authen->username;
    # is user logged in?
    if ($user) {
    my $message = "User $user is already logged in!";
    my $template = $self->load_tmpl('default.html');
    $template->param(MESSAGE => $message);
    $template->param(MYURL => $url);
    return $template->output;
    } else {
    my $url = $self->query->self_url;
    unless ($url =~ /^https/) {
            $url =~ s/^http/https/;
        return $self->redirect($url);
    }
    return $self->my_login_form;
    }
}

# generate custom login. See templates/login_form.html
sub my_login_form {
    my $self = shift;
    my $template = $self->load_tmpl('login_form.html');

    (undef, my $info) = split(/\//, $ENV{'PATH_INFO'});
    my $url = $self->query->url;

    # 'destination' contains the URL of the page to go to once the user has successfully logged in

    # try to get a value for 'destination' from the CGI query object (in case it was passed as a hidden variable)
    my $destination = $self->query->param('destination');

    # If failed to get from CGI query object, try get destination from PATH_INFO environment variable
    # in case it's being passed as part of the URL
    unless ($destination) {
    if ($info) {
        $destination = $info;
    } else {
        # default to index page
        $destination = "index";
    }
    }

    my $error = $self->authen->login_attempts;

    # insert values into the template parameters
    $template->param(MYURL => $url);
    $template->param(ERROR => $error);
    $template->param(DESTINATION => $destination);

    # generate final html
    return $template->output;
}
# logout method
sub logout : Runmode {
    my $self = shift;
    if ($self->authen->username) {
    $self->authen->logout;
    $self->session->delete; # Delete current session
    }
    return $self->redirect($self->query->url);
}

# error runmode / page
sub myerror : ErrorRunmode {
    my $self = shift;
    my $error = shift;
    my $template = $self->load_tmpl("default.html");
    $template->param(NAME => 'ERROR');
    $template->param(MESSAGE => $error);
    $template->param(MYURL => $self->query->url);
    return $template->output;
}

# called if non-existant runmode/page is accessed. Gives a nicer error message, when typing a wrong url
sub AUTOLOAD : Runmode {
    my $self = shift;
    my $rm = shift;
    my $template = $self->load_tmpl("default.html");
    $template->param(NAME => 'AUTOLOAD');
    $template->param(MESSAGE => "<p>Error: could not find run mode \'$rm\'<br>\n");
    $template->param(MYURL => $self->query->url);
    return $template->output;
}

1;

Update 2

I am now getting that $self->authen->username is always set to undef when the mustLogin runmode is called. This means that multiple users can login.

I have inserted

  open F, ">/tmp/debug";
  print F Dumper $self->authen->username;
  close F;

where the problem occurs.

$self->cfg('SESSIONS_DIR') returns the correct path.

Any idea why $self->authen->username is set to undef the mustLogin is run?

sub teardown {
  my $self = shift;

  $self->param('found_a_user', 0);

  CGI::Session->find(
      "driver:File;serializer:yaml",
      sub { my_subroutine($self, @_)},
      {Directory => $self->cfg('SESSIONS_DIR'), UMask => 0600,},
      );

  open F, ">/tmp/debug";
  print F Dumper $self->authen->username;
  close F;

  # get state of can_login file
  open my $fh, '+<', 'can_login.yaml';
  flock($fh, LOCK_EX) or die "couldn't get lock: $!\n";
  my $c = YAML::Syck::LoadFile($fh);

  if ( $self->param('found_a_user') ) {
      # found a logged in user with an unexpired session
      $c->{can_login} = 0;
  } else {
      # did NOT find any logged in users
      $c->{can_login} = 1;
  }

  # write
  my $yaml = YAML::Syck::Dump($c);
  $YAML::Syck::ImplicitUnicode = 1;
  seek $fh,0, SEEK_SET;   # seek back to the beginning of file
  print $fh $yaml . "---\n";
  close $fh;
}

sub my_subroutine {
  my $self = shift;
  my ($session) = @_;  # I don't actually need this for anything here

  if ($self->authen->username) {
    $self->param('found_a_user', 1);
  }

}
share|improve this question
    
Will user be required to logout before other user will be able to login? –  Alexandr Ciornii Jul 19 '11 at 14:14
    
@Alexandr Ciornii : This is the problem now. If the session times out, then no one can log in, because the file where I keep the state of $can_login haven't been changed to TRUE. Do you have an idea how I can set $can_login to TRUE, if there isn't an active session? –  Sandra Schlichting Jul 21 '11 at 11:56
    
Store time of last access and username in DB/file. When user access it, check if it is the same user. If it is different user and some time has passed, allow him to login. –  Alexandr Ciornii Jul 21 '11 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just one user at a time? That's a pretty strange requirement. I've never had to do anything like that before. Here's one way to go about it: you'll need a binary state variable called something like 'can_login'. You can store this in a file, or in a database. Initialize it to 'true', and then as soon as a user successfully logs in, toggle it to 'false'. How to do this? Inside $self->authen->config(), define a value for POST_LOGIN_CALLBACK. This will need to point to a code reference to check the 'can_login' value. If the user is authenticated, AND 'can_login' is true, toggle 'can_login' to false to prevent other logins. If the user is authenticated, and 'can_login' is false, call $self->authen->logout to log them out, and redirect them to a page saying "there can be only one!" or whatever. Also - make sure you create a timeout value on the session holding the login info, so that you don't accidentally lock everyone out because someone forgot to log out. If you store the 'can_login' value in a file, you'll have to implement file locking to avoid race conditions. If you store it in a database, you'll have to figure out how to pass the proper database handle to the callback code ref (maybe stick it into a global variable in the setup() method). Your logout runmode should log the user out, as usual, PLUS toggle the 'can_login' value back to true. The code that handles expiring old sessions should do this also. You might even do this in a separate process (like a cron job that runs every 5 minutes) - expire old sessions, check for active logins, and if none exist make sure 'can_login' is true.

UPDATE

Regarding how to handle expiring sessions, let's assume you have something like this inside your cgiapp_init() method:

$self->session_config(
  CGI_SESSION_OPTIONS => [
    "driver:File;serializer:yaml",
    $self->query,
    {Directory => $self->cfg('SESSIONS_DIR'), UMask => 0600,},
  ],

  DEFAULT_EXPIRY => '+1h',
  COOKIE_PARAMS => {
    -path     => '/',
    -httponly => 1,        # help avoid XSS attacks
  },
);

Then normally you might want a teardown method like this:

sub teardown {
  my $self = shift;

  # purge old sessions
  CGI::Session->find(
    "driver:File;serializer:yaml",
    sub {},
    {Directory => $self->cfg('SESSIONS_DIR'), UMask => 0600,},
  );
}

The teardown() method gets called at the end of every run mode. In this case, all it does is expire old sessions (see the docs for CGI::Session for more details - look at the section under the "find" method). The general form is this:

find($dsn, \&code, \%dsn_args);

The $dsn and \%dsn_args should match whatever you have in your session config - that's why I showed mine, for example. The coderef here doesn't have to do anything, because find() automatically calls load() for each session, and that will automatically remove any that have already expired - since that's all I want it to do, nothing else is required. But you could use this to check for a logged in user. You'll have to do something like this:

sub teardown {
  my $self = shift;

  $self->param('found_a_user',0);

  CGI::Session->find(
    "driver:File;serializer:yaml",
    sub { my_subroutine( $self, @_ ) },
    {Directory => $self->cfg('SESSIONS_DIR'), UMask => 0600,},
  );

  if ( $self->param('found_a_user') ) {
    # found a logged in user with an unexpired session: set $can_login=0 here
  } else {
    # did NOT find any logged in users - set $can_login=1 here
  }

}

sub my_subroutine {
  my $self = shift;
  my ($session) = @_;  # I don't actually need this for anything here

  if ($self->authen->username) {
    $self->param('found_a_user',1);
  }

}

Note that my_subroutine is not a method, so I have to pass $self as an extra argument. I need that to access authen->username, which will only be true if we have a logged in user with an unexpired session. Note that this will get called for every session, removing old sessions as it goes. If the 'found_a_user' parameter gets set to 1, then we know we found at least one active user and can update the $can_login variable as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! I will get right to it. Instead of remembering the state with $can_login, would it be possible in the login runmode to if ($#users > 1) {$self->authen->logout;}.? Would something like that work, if I can ask for the number of logged in users? –  Sandra Schlichting Jul 20 '11 at 12:11
1  
As far as I know, there is nothing in the authentication module that counts how many users are currently logged in. If you need that, you could implement it in a similar fashion, you'd just create a $user_count variable instead of the $can_login boolean. Update the count inside the login/logout methods (and watch out for logouts due to expired sessions!) Of course, if the original implementation you asked about works as desired, the count will never be anything other than 0 or 1. If you were hoping for a "count" method to make that easier, sorry! –  scorpio17 Jul 20 '11 at 12:44
1  
I updated the answer to include more on expiring sessions - I hope that helps! –  scorpio17 Jul 21 '11 at 14:47
1  
You could use a meta tag refresh to force a full page reload every 60 seconds or so. If your ajax requests are targeting protected runmodes, you might design those runmodes to return nothing if a user is not logged in. That way logging out effectively turns off updates without breaking the page. –  scorpio17 Jul 22 '11 at 17:58
1  
You can use $self->redirect('runmode') - it will basically append the specified runmode to the current URL. This is good if you want to use a different run mode inside the same instance script. If you need to redirect to a different instance script, then use $self->redirect($url). –  scorpio17 Jul 22 '11 at 18:03

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