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The following is my simple attempt at generating Armstrong numbers. But it only outputs "1". What might be wrong?

#include<stdio.h> 
#include<conio.h> 
#include<iostream.h>

int main() 
{ 
    clrscr();
    int r; 
    long int num = 0, i, sum = 0, temp; 

    cout << "Enter the maximum limit to generate Armstrong number "; 
    cin >> num;
    cout << "Following armstrong numbers are found from 1 to " << num << "\t \n"; 

    for(i=1;i<=num;i++) 
    { 
        temp = i; 
        while( temp != 0 ) 
        { 
            r = temp%10; 
            sum = sum + r*r*r; 
            temp = temp / 10; 
        } 

        if ( i == sum ) {
            cout << i;
            sum = 0; 
        }
    } 

    getch(); 

    return 0; 
}
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closed as too localized by Dante is not a Geek, Ram kiran, Jim O'Neil, mu is too short, dreamcrash Dec 5 '12 at 2:58

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2  
Have you tried debugging it? –  Björn Pollex Jul 19 '11 at 12:08
    
Just a suggestion, you might want to limit your usage of comma operators. –  Serodis Jul 19 '11 at 12:15
    
One small step...in the debugger of course. –  Captain Obvlious Jul 19 '11 at 12:15
    
My problem is all solved but the answers are all scattered.. which should be the right answer? –  Power-Inside Jul 19 '11 at 13:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to always set sum = 0 inside the for-i-loop.

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look carefully he is setting 'sum =0' –  UmmaGumma Jul 19 '11 at 12:15
    
@Ashot: not always, only if i == sum. –  Henrik Jul 19 '11 at 12:16
    
@Henrik right :) –  UmmaGumma Jul 19 '11 at 12:17
    
Ok i got it.. so I was resetting the sum ONLY when i==sum becomes true.. my mistake. –  Power-Inside Jul 19 '11 at 12:30

Armstrong numbers: n-digit numbers equal to sum of n-th powers of their digits.

From your code

sum = sum + r*r*r;

'r*r*r' isn't n'th power of the number.

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@Power-Inside no it's not correct –  duedl0r Jul 19 '11 at 12:18
    
Sorry yes, there is a problem.. thanks for pointing it out.. im very hasty –  Power-Inside Jul 19 '11 at 12:21
    
@Power-Inside have a look at my answer. calculate the n using log function. –  duedl0r Jul 19 '11 at 12:24

The first thing is that you're assuming that n (as in the nth power) is always three (in your r*r*r). That's only true if your initial value has three digits (as with the 153 example).

You need to count the digits in your initial number to calculate n, and then replace your r*r*r with raising r to the nth power.

This doesn't explain why 153 isn't found, though. The reason for that is because you aren't reseting sum to zero unless you find a match. You need to reset it to zero whether you found a match or not.

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you can calculate n using log:

n = log(i)+1

then calculate r^n correctly and use it in your summation: sum += r^n;. r*r*r is not the correct way of calculating it.

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log(i) from <math.h>in C and C++ is logarithm base e=2.718..., not base 10! –  René Richter Jul 19 '11 at 12:25
    
yes thanks, I was all the time debugging my code with 3 digit limit numbers so that is why this did not notice the problem –  Power-Inside Jul 19 '11 at 12:28
    
@rene How should I approach the log function then? I've never used it in c++ before. Please advice if you may –  Power-Inside Jul 19 '11 at 12:28
    
you can either use log10 or log(i)/log(10) depending what you have available :) –  duedl0r Jul 19 '11 at 12:35
    
I found it.. its log10() function under math.h header.. thanks –  Power-Inside Jul 19 '11 at 12:43

Your code only works with n=3 : sum = sum + r*r*r;

You must use the pow() function (http://www.codecogs.com/reference/c/math.h/pow.php) to compute powers. (Or create a custom one.)

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Well, strictly, it works for the value 1, because 1 to the nth power is always 1 irrespective of the value of n. –  Steve314 Jul 19 '11 at 12:16

To summarize the right, but partial answers:

// #include <math.h>

for (long int i = 1; i <= num; i++) 
{ 
    long int n = 0, sum = 0;  //  <--- here 
    long ing temp = i; 
    while ( temp != 0 ) 
    { 
        ++n;
        temp /= 10; 
    } 

    temp = i; 
    while ( temp != 0 ) 
    { 
        int r = temp%10; 
        sum += int(pow(double(r), n)); // <-- here
        temp /= 10; 
    } 
    if ( i == sum ) 
    {
        cout << i;
        sum = 0; 
    }
} 
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@Power-inside, I saw your code, its difficult to change your code and edit it, but I have written a similar code to generate Armstrong numbers in a given limit, and it works fine. Here it is....

  #include<iostream.h>
  #include<conio.h>
    class arm
       {
    int a;
    public:
       void display();
        };
     void arm::display()
          {
             cout<<"Enter any number to find armstrong numbers less than it";
             cin>>a;
              for(int i=a;i>=1;i--)
            {
              int d=i;
              int b=i;
              int c=i;
              int count=0;
                while(b!=0)
                    {
                      b=b/10;
                      count++;
                    }
                   int l,m;
                   m=0;
                for(int k=1;k<=count;k++)
               {
                  l=c%10;
                   c=c/10;
                   m=m+l*l*l;
                }



              if(d==m)

              cout<<d<<"\t";

             }

              }


            void main()
              {
                 arm k;
                 k.display();
                 getch();
                }
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