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A tale of two traits that seem like should play nicely together but don't and I can't make heads of tails of why this code doesn't work or what the compilation error is REALLY trying to tell me.

So ... we have

A trait for parents ...

trait PolyTreeHasParents[P <: PolyTreeHasChildren[_]]  { 


val _parents: ListBuffer[P] = ListBuffer()

def isRootNode = _parents.size == 0

def parents: List[P] = _parents.readOnly

def addParent(parent: P): PolyTreeHasParents[P] = {

    println(parent)

    if (parent == this)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException()

    _parents += parent

    // 

    this
}




} 

and a trait for children ...

trait PolyTreeHasChildren[C <: PolyTreeHasParents[_]]  {   


val _children: ListBuffer[C] = ListBuffer()

def isLeafNode = children == ListBuffer()

def children: List[C] = _children.readOnly

def += (child: C) : PolyTreeHasChildren[C] = {
    addChild(child)
}

def addChild(child: C): PolyTreeHasChildren[C] = {


    if (child == this)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException()

    _children += child

    child.addParent(this)  // <= ERROR HERE

    this

}

}

The pointer to ERROR tells that a type mismatch that was found.

PolyTreeHasChildren.this.type(with underlying type PolyTreeHasChildren[C]) required: _$1 where type _$1 

I would have thought that adding

P :< PolyTreeHasParents[_]

would have allowed me to add a reference to child's parents.

Here is the weird part ... to review, the error is:

required: _$1 where type _$1 

What!?

Alas ... I have run out of ideas on how to make this code work : (

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4 Answers 4

You can avoid this apparent infinite circularity through two means:

First, remove unnecessary type bounds ( Common programming mistakes for Scala developers to avoid ) -- at least in your current implementation of PolyTreeHasParents, there is no need to say that P must be a subtype of PolyTreeHasChildren.

Second, you can add another type argument to PolyTreeHasChildren specifying the implementing type, and use it as a self-type. This is a common pattern in the collections library, I think.

It would look like this:

import collection.mutable.ListBuffer

trait PolyTreeHasParents[P] { 
   val _parents: ListBuffer[P] = ListBuffer()
   def isRootNode = _parents.size == 0
   def parents: List[P] = _parents.readOnly
   def addParent(parent: P): PolyTreeHasParents[P] = {
      require (parent != this)
      _parents += parent
      this
   }
}

trait PolyTreeHasChildren[Repr, C <: PolyTreeHasParents[Repr]] {   
   me: Repr =>

   val _children: ListBuffer[C] = ListBuffer()
   def isLeafNode = children == ListBuffer()
   def children: List[C] = _children.readOnly
   def += (child: C) : Repr = {
      addChild(child)
   }

   def addChild(child: C): Repr = {
      require (child != this)
      _children += child
      child.addParent(this)
      this
   }
}
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The error message seems weird but there is method in this madness. What it says is: you are passing in a parameter of some known type. But you have specified it as a parameter of some unknown type which is skolomized in this case to _$1.

In your code you can completely get rid of the type parameters:

trait PolyTreeHasParents {
  type P = PolyTreeHasChildren
  val _parents: ListBuffer[P] = ListBuffer()
  def isRootNode = _parents.size == 0
  def parents: List[P] = _parents.readOnly

  def addParent(parent: P): PolyTreeHasParents = {

    if (!_parents.contains(parent)) {
      println(parent)
      if (parent == this) throw new IllegalArgumentException()
      _parents += parent
      parent.addChild(this)
    }
    this
  }
}

trait PolyTreeHasChildren {
  type C = PolyTreeHasParents
  val _children: ListBuffer[C] = ListBuffer()

  def isLeafNode = children == ListBuffer()

  def children: List[C] = _children.readOnly

  def +=(child: C): PolyTreeHasChildren = {
    addChild(child)
  }

  def addChild(child: C): PolyTreeHasChildren = {
    if (!_children.contains(child)) {
      println(child)
      if (child == this)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException()
      _children += child
      child.addParent(this)
    }
    this
  }
}

See this behavior:

object Test {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    trait X extends PolyTreeHasParents with PolyTreeHasChildren
    trait Y extends PolyTreeHasParents with PolyTreeHasChildren
    val x0, x1, x2 = new  X {}
    val y0, y1, y2 = new  Y {}
    x0.addChild(x1)
    x1.addChild(x2)
    y2.addParent(y1)
    y1.addParent(y0)
    x0.addParent(y2)
  }
}

Now let's compare this to the behavior of the solution of "n.m.":

object Test {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    trait X extends PolyTreeHasParents[X, X] with PolyTreeHasChildren[X, X]
    trait Y extends PolyTreeHasParents[Y, Y] with PolyTreeHasChildren[Y, Y]
    val x0, x1, x2 = new X {}
    val y0, y1, y2 = new Y {}
    x0.addChild(x1)
    x1.addChild(x2)
    y2.addParent(y1)
    y1.addParent(y0)
//    x0.addParent(y2) // will not compile
  }
}      
share|improve this answer
    
Does this work equally well if both PolyTreeHasParents has a method addParent and PolyTreeHasChildren has a method addChild like in the answer provide by n.m? –  user465342 Jul 21 '11 at 22:23
    
Sure, see code above. What makes this code simpler is that it allows you to add anything of PolyTreeHasChildren to anything of PolyTreeHasParents and the otherway around. In n.m.'s solution you can restrict that to specific types and type check on it. But I could not make up from your question that you really need that. –  Jan van der Vorst Jul 22 '11 at 10:03

Have you tried something like

 trait PolyTreeHasParents[P <: PolyTreeHasChildren[PolyTreeHasParents[P]]]  { }

 trait PolyTreeHasChildren[C <: PolyTreeHasParents[PolyTreeHasChildren[C]]]  { }

Existential types are no good here. You essentialy say "my parent has some children of unknown kind". You should say something like "my parent has children which are like me".

Disclaimer: I didn't have a chance to to test this yet (no real computer nearby, only a cell phone).

UPDATE: no, this doesn't work. In case you're still interested, below is some working code. I have added it symmetric (addParent calls addChild, addChild calls addParent) in order to illustrate how it works when circular dependencies are really needed. I have used 0__'s idea of injecting sel-type in there. import scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer

trait PolyTreeHasParents[Repr <: PolyTreeHasParents[Repr, P], 
      P <: PolyTreeHasChildren[P, Repr]]  {   

me: Repr =>

    val _parents: ListBuffer[P] = ListBuffer()
    def isRootNode = _parents.size == 0
    def parents: List[P] = _parents.readOnly
    def addParent(parent: P): Repr = { 
        if (! _parents.contains(parent) {
            println(parent)
            if (parent == this)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException()
            _parents += parent
            parent.addChild(this)
        }
        this
    }
}

trait PolyTreeHasChildren[Repr <: PolyTreeHasChildren[Repr, C],
      C <: PolyTreeHasParents[C, Repr]]  {

me: Repr =>

    val _children: ListBuffer[C] = ListBuffer()
    def isLeafNode = children == ListBuffer()
    def children: List[C] = _children.readOnly
    def += (child: C) : PolyTreeHasChildren[Repr, C] = { 
        addChild(child)
    }
    def addChild(child: C): Repr = { 
        if (! _children.contains(child) {
            println(child)
            if (child == this)
              throw new IllegalArgumentException()
            _children += child
            child.addParent(this)
        }
        this
    }
}

// Usage example
class PP extends PolyTreeHasChildren[PP, CC]
class CC extends PolyTreeHasParents[CC, PP]
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Worked like a charm! Thanks for highlighting that the trait shouldn't be able to add a child that it has already added. Made a couple of small changes ... instead of if(Parent == this) ..., changed that to require(child != this). Also ... moved from mutable lists to immutable ones. –  user465342 Jul 21 '11 at 22:20

The complexity in the type parameter bounds stems a.o. from the fact that your PolyTree is composed of 2 traits. One containing the parents and another one containing the childs.

I do not understand what the use case might be for having these separate traits. Since in a PolyTree, in general, all your nodes could have children and/or parents. So I think one would always mix them in both.

If that is the case then one could get rid of much of the type parameter bounds complexity:

trait PolyTree[Self <: PolyTree[Self] ] {
  self: Self =>

  private val _parents: ListBuffer[Self] = ListBuffer()
  def isRootNode = _parents.isEmpty
  def parents: List[Self] = _parents.readOnly

  def addParent(parent: Self): Self = {

    if (!_parents.contains(parent)) {
      println(parent)
      if (parent == this) throw new IllegalArgumentException()
      _parents += parent
      parent.addChild(this)
    }
    this
  }

  private val _children: ListBuffer[Self] = ListBuffer()
  def isLeafNode = _children.isEmpty
  def children: List[Self] = _children.readOnly

  def addChild(child: Self): Self = {
    if (!_children.contains(child)) {
      println(child)
      if (child == this)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException()
      _children += child
      child.addParent(this)
    }
    this
  }

}

Use case:

object UseCasePolyTree {
  trait X extends PolyTree[X]
  trait Y extends PolyTree[Y]
  val x0, x1, x2 = new X {}
  val y0, y1, y2 = new Y {}
  x0.addChild(x1)
  x1.addChild(x2)
  val xx1: X = x2.parents.head
  y2.addParent(y1)
  y1.addParent(y0)
//  x0.addParent(y2) // will not compile
}

Apart from that: a polytree is acyclic. You should still have to add code to prevent the creation of cycles.

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