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I am trying to find some examples but no luck. Does anyone know of some examples on the net? I would like to know what it returns when it can't find, and how to specify from start to end, which I guess is going to be 0, -1.

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Are you asking about docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#id4 ? Are you asking about the find method, specifically? docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#str.find –  S.Lott Mar 23 '09 at 19:00
    
Thanks yeah just the find method. I found that page but no examples. –  Joan Venge Mar 23 '09 at 19:03
    
It says -1 on the page. What more did you need to know? –  S.Lott Mar 23 '09 at 19:05
    
No I mean, just some examples. –  Joan Venge Mar 23 '09 at 20:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 34 down vote accepted

you can use str.index too:

>>> 'sdfasdf'.index('cc')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#144>", line 1, in <module>
    'sdfasdf'.index('cc')
ValueError: substring not found
>>> 'sdfasdf'.index('df')
1
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2  
Why would you choose one over the other? –  endolith Nov 8 '09 at 1:46
    
it raises the error instead of returning a code, which is more pythonic, in my opinion. –  SilentGhost Nov 8 '09 at 11:33
6  
exceptions should not be used for flow control. so, only use index() if no match would be abnormal. –  aehlke Jul 5 '10 at 11:19
8  
@Wahnfrieden: using exception is perfectly pythonic. And certainly doesn't deserve a downvote. –  SilentGhost Jul 5 '10 at 12:44
7  
@aehlke in fact, in Python, using exceptions to control flow is usual and even recommended: stackoverflow.com/questions/6092992/… –  Rafael Almeida Jan 9 '12 at 20:32

I'm not sure what you're looking for, do you mean find()?

>>> x = "Hello World"
>>> x.find('World')
6
>>> x.find('Aloha');
-1
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Thanks, what do you get, if it can't find? –  Joan Venge Mar 23 '09 at 19:00
1  
-1 says my python shell –  SilentGhost Mar 23 '09 at 19:01
    
You get -1, updated with link to docs and example. –  Paolo Bergantino Mar 23 '09 at 19:01
1  
Thanks, but why -1 here, not for index? I thought python prefers exceptions over special return values. –  Joan Venge Mar 23 '09 at 19:02
    
@Joan: see my answer –  SilentGhost Mar 23 '09 at 19:03

find( sub[, start[, end]])

Return the lowest index in the string where substring sub is found, such that sub is contained in the range [start, end]. Optional arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation. Return -1 if sub is not found.

From the docs.

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Honestly, this is the sort of situation where I just open up Python on the command line and start messing around:

 >>> x = "Dana Larose is playing with find()"
 >>> x.find("Dana")
 0
 >>> x.find("ana")
 1
 >>> x.find("La")
 5
 >>> x.find("La", 6)
 -1

Python's interpreter makes this sort of experimentation easy. (Same goes for other languages with a similar interpreter)

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IPython makes this sort of thing even better. –  endolith Nov 8 '09 at 1:45

From here:

str.find(sub[, start[, end]])
Return the lowest index in the string where substring sub is found, such that sub is contained in the range [start, end]. Optional arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation. Return -1 if sub is not found."

So, some examples:

>>> str = "abcdefioshgoihgs sijsiojs "
>>> str.find('a')
0
>>> str.find('g')
10
>>> str.find('s',11)
15
>>> str.find('s',15)
15
>>> str.find('s',16)
17
>>> str.find('s',11,14)
-1
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9  
Generally not a good idea to use words like str as variable names.. –  John Fouhy Mar 23 '09 at 22:07

If you want to search for the last instance of a string in a text, you can run rfind.

Example:

   s="Hello"
   print s.rfind('l')

output: 3

*no import needed

Complete syntax:

stringEx.rfind(substr, beg=0, end=len(stringEx))
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Try this:

with open(file_dmp_path, 'rb') as file:
fsize = bsize = os.path.getsize(file_dmp_path)
word_len = len(SEARCH_WORD)
while True:
    p = file.read(bsize).find(SEARCH_WORD)
    if p > -1:
        pos_dec = file.tell() - (bsize - p)
        file.seek(pos_dec + word_len)
        bsize = fsize - file.tell()
    if file.tell() < fsize:
        seek = file.tell() - word_len + 1
        file.seek(seek)
    else:
        break
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