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It's me again :P I have an array:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => zad0xsis
            [name] => zad0xsis
            [1] => http://es.gravatar.com/userimage/17503042/86ae3c2e40e7b5cdde3935c57e2da86b.jpg?size=100
            [avatar] => http://es.gravatar.com/userimage/17503042/86ae3c2e40e7b5cdde3935c57e2da86b.jpg?size=100
            [2] => f4a42dce15cebcead096b65191a206eb
            [password] => f4a42dce15cebcead096b65191a206eb
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => zad0xsis1
            [name] => zad0xsis1
            [1] => http://es.gravatar.com/userimage/17503042/86ae3c2e40e7b5cdde3935c57e2da86b.jpg?size=1100
            [avatar] => http://es.gravatar.com/userimage/17503042/86ae3c2e40e7b5cdde3935c57e2da86b.jpg?size=1100
            [2] => f4a42dce15cebcead096b65191a206eb
            [password] => f4a42dce15cebcead096b65191a206eb
        )

)

Now, how could I know if, for example, [name] => zad0xsis1 is on array[0] or array[1]? I thought of having a value (0 for example) and if PHP doesn't find that data there, look in the next by adding 1 to that value, but that could be so slow with a lot of users

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closed as not a real question by Ken White, karim79, Cody Gray, abatishchev, Neil Knight Jul 21 '11 at 19:14

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Maybe you can speed up things by using array_key_exists? – Bas Slagter Jul 19 '11 at 13:42
up vote 5 down vote accepted
function findIndexByName ($array, $name) {
  foreach ($array as $index => $entry)
     if ($entry['name'] === $name) return $index;
  return null; // or "false", or "-1", or whatever 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Beat me to it. But I would return FALSE, considering this is more typical of what PHP returns when it doesn't find anything. – Brad Christie Jul 19 '11 at 13:41
    
@Brad: Its (as always) up to you, what you would return, but I would recommend null, because by definition null means something like "nothing", what (in my opinion) fits here very well. – KingCrunch Jul 19 '11 at 13:43
    
Agreed, however array_search and next (among other array-based functions) all return FALSE when there is no acceptable value to return. – Brad Christie Jul 19 '11 at 13:47

If you have a lot of data, you should put it in a database instead of keeping it all in memory. That way, you can easily use a SELECT statement to retrieve the information.

If you must have it in an array like this:

If the data is sorted by the key you're looking for, you can binary-search through the information.

If not, there's nothing much you can do aside from a

foreach ($list as $key => $value) { 
    if (...) { 
        $found = $key; 
        break; 
    } 
}
share|improve this answer

It can't be slower than check every element of array if you don't save any other data. But If for example, users sorted by name you can do it faster

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With arrays alone, you can't do any better than just looking at array[0], then array[1], all the way to array[length] to find the name you want. Arrays are a linear data structure.

Believe it or not, even with 10,000 users this is a roughly zero-time operation. Computers are very fast and looking at each element of an array is cheap.

Have you considered keeping the array sorted by name? Use ksort to sort by name (http://php.net/manual/en/function.ksort.php) and then use a binary search (this is not implemented by default in php, but there's lots of good code available (see http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-search.php and search for 'binary search') A binary search is much faster than a linear search because it uses the fact that the array is sorted and jumps around rather than checking each one.

Not however that sorting after every single time you add a user is actually pretty expensive compared to just linearly searching the array. Either add users correctly so that the array remains sorted, or just use a linear search as you've described in your question.

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Why don't youindex array on name if name is going to be unique e.g Array ( [zad0xsis] => Array ( [0] => zad0xsis [name] => zad0xsis )

[zad0xsis1] => Array
    (
        [0] => zad0xsis1
        [name] => zad0xsis1

    )

)

or else create another array which store indexes against name e.g Array( [zad0xsis1] => Array( [0] => 1 //indexes of main array with name zad0xsis1 ) )

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