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I have reversed out a network protocol and have a python script acting as a client to a network service. It works perfectly and looks roughly like:

create TCP socket (default - blocking)
send data
recv data
..
..
send data
recv data
close socket

However, I want to modify it so that it loops through a list - essentially within the python script it will loop through the code which currently works perfectly already:

for item in list:
  create TCP socket (default - blocking)
  send data
  recv data
  ...
  ...
  send data
  recv data
  close socket

But it fails - after the 2nd send() I get a TCP reset from the other side despite the packet captures being exactly the same. That is, if I run the non-looping script twice it works but the iterating version doesn't.

I have suspicions that there is some python/OSX (Snow Leopard) magic threading happening which may be causing variables to change (maybe GCD??). I'm reasonably new to Python so maybe there is something super obvious that I have missed in my reading.

Couple of final points:

  • Sockets are blocking
  • Application sequencing is being handled properly (based on packet diffs)

Cheers Jonathan

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1  
this question is pretty vague. If you want an answer you're going to need to provide more information. Putting on my psychic debugging hat, does the server close the connection after one s/r pair? –  Paul Rubel Jul 19 '11 at 13:59
3  
There is never any magic threading happening in Python. –  agf Jul 19 '11 at 14:02
    
The basic outline of your code is fine and should work. So the problem lies in the implementation details, either on the server or the client side. Perhaps the server is reusing state and dying as a result. –  wberry Jul 19 '11 at 22:52

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