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While inserting in a set, does the set internally delete some of the objects multiple times? I tried to insert two objects of type MyClass as in following program but to my surprise it calls the destructor of class with initially inserted value 2 times! I am not able to understand any logic behind this. Can anyone give some idea on the output? (highlighted as bold)

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<set>

 using namespace std;

   struct MyClass 
   {
      double num;

      ~MyClass()
      {
         printf("Destructor called..for val: %lf\n", num);
      }
   };

   typedef int (*fun_comp)(MyClass, MyClass);   

  int
   comp(MyClass a, MyClass b)
   {
      return a.num-b.num;
   }

  int
   main()
   {
      fun_comp fptr;
      fptr = &comp;
      set<MyClass, int (*)(MyClass, MyClass)> b(fptr);

      for(int i=3; i< 5; i++)
      {
         printf("started with i: %d....\n\n", i);
         {
            MyClass m;
            m.num=i*1.134;
            b.insert(m);
            printf("Inserted val: %lf\n", m.num);
         }
         printf("ended....\n\n");
      }

      printf("Done with insert..\n");      
      return 0;
   }

output: started with i: 3....

Inserted val: 3.402000

Destructor called..for val: 3.402000

ended....

started with i: 4....

Destructor called..for val: 4.536000 <------- why this is deallocated before insertion

Destructor called..for val: 3.402000 <------- multiple call to destructor for this valued object

Destructor called..for val: 4.536000 <-------- ??

Destructor called..for val: 3.402000 <------ again!!

Inserted val: 4.536000

Destructor called..for val: 4.536000

ended....

Done with insert..

Destructor called..for val: 3.402000

Destructor called..for val: 4.536000

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1  
I'd suggest changing from printing 'val' to printing the value of the 'this' pointer in the destructor, along with 'val', as I suspect you will have a clearer understanding of the behavior of your code afterwards. –  acm Jul 19 '11 at 14:23
    
thanks but I did it but an not able to conclude any valid reason except that the addresses are stored in different region.. here is the output sample output.. –  raja Jul 19 '11 at 14:32
    
started with i: 3.... Inserted val: 3.402000 Destructor called..for val: 3.402000 0x7fff82190a10 ended.... started with i: 4.... Destructor called..for val: 4.536000 0x7fff821908e0 Destructor called..for val: 3.402000 0x7fff821908d0 Destructor called..for val: 4.536000 0x7fff821907d0 Destructor called..for val: 3.402000 0x7fff821907c0 Inserted val: 4.536000 Destructor called..for val: 4.536000 0x7fff82190a10 ended.... Done with insert.. Destructor called..for val: 3.402000 0x998030 Destructor called..for val: 4.536000 0x998060 –  raja Jul 19 '11 at 14:32
    
Well, the question was answered below. What I was trying to show you was that using 'val' to detect object identity was misleading, since copied objects would have the same 'val', but different 'this' values. –  acm Jul 19 '11 at 14:33
    
BTW, the comparison function is also unsuitable for set. It must return true if left hand value is smaller (return a.num < b.num;), and false otherwise. Your comparison function returns "true" (or "false") regardless of which is smaller. - By violating the requirements of a std::set, you can get any kinds of results. –  UncleBens Jul 19 '11 at 14:36
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The comparator

int    
comp(MyClass a, MyClass b)
{
   return a.num-b.num;
}  

takes its parameters by value. This will create extra copies that are then destroyed.

Passing by reference will work better.

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yeah awesome thanks its now working perfect.. :) –  raja Jul 19 '11 at 14:37
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Change the comparison function to use (const) references

int comp(const MyClass& a, const MyClass& b)
{
  return a.num-b.num;
}

Each time your comp is being called it is creating copies of a and b. These copies are being destroyed when comp exits.

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In addition to the points made above, your comparison function isn't valid because it doesn't specify a consistent ordering of the values. If a.num=1 and b.num=2 then comp(a,b) is true, meaning that a "comes before" b, and comp(b,a) is also true, meaning that b "comes before" a. This makes the behavior of set undefined.

It's better to create a less-than operator for MyClass and let set<>'s default comparison function do the work: struct MyClass { double num;

  ~MyClass()
  {
     printf("Destructor called..for val: %lf\n", num);
  }
  bool operator < (const MyClass &rhs) const
  {
    return num < rhs.num;
  }
};
...
set<MyClass> b;
share|improve this answer
    
hmm..point to notice!! thanks –  raja Jul 19 '11 at 14:43
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