Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a database with a tables called 'Sites' This table has the columns, SiteID, Name, Tags, Description, URI, with SiteID being a primary key (It is not set as an Identity because we want to add our own ID)

We have been using .NET 4.0 MVC with C# and have setup everything up in the code which we need. We can select things from the database and display them so we know that is working. But when we try to insert we get a Cannot insert the value NULL into column 'SiteID' error.

If I set the column as an Identity so that it auto generates, or if I take off the primary key then it is fine, but as I said it should be a primary key and we want to insert out own ID's.

My code is below (We get the error on SaveChanges() but have checked in the debugger and SiteID is definitely being assigned an int)

Sites

public class Sites
{
    [Key]
    public int SiteID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Tags { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public string URI { get; set; }
}

CMSModels

public class CMSModels : DbContext
{
//public DbSet<ContentTypeModel> ContentType { get; set; }
    //public DbSet<LayoutModel> Layout { get; set; }
    //public DbSet<PageModel> Page { get; set; }
    //public DbSet<PageZoneModel> PageZone { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Sites> Site { get; set; }
    //public DbSet<ZoneContentModel> ZoneContent { get; set; }
    //public DbSet<ZoneTypeModel> ZoneType { get; set; }
}

HomeController:

private CMSModels models = new CMSModels();

public ActionResult Index()
{
    Sites site = new Sites { SiteID = 4, Name = "Name", Description = "Desc", Tags = "", URI = "" };

    models.Site.Add(site);
    models.SaveChanges();

    return View(models.Site.ToList());
}

I don't understand why I am getting this error, so any ideas would be appreciated.

If you need to see any other code please let me know.

Edit:

Just to extend this question a bit, it seems that this only happens on primary keys which are of the type int.

If we set the database column data type to nvarchar and the data types in the code to string it works fine.

Is this just a bug in Entity Framework 4, or are we just doing something wrong?

If we can't find a way to insert ints into a primary key column we may just have to use strings instead and validate them to make sure they are numeric.

share|improve this question
1  
You should add in an identity column, your SiteID sounds like a natural key, but things will be a lot easier if you have a primary key column –  MattDavey Jul 19 '11 at 15:02
    
Are you using Entity Framework 4? This has nothing to do with MVC. –  Andrew Koester Jul 19 '11 at 15:07
    
Yes, it is Entity Framework 4 –  Sour Lemon Jul 19 '11 at 15:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you want a NO IDENTITY primary key column, so you set the id manually, you have 2 possible solutions.

1. Decorate your id propertie with the following Attributes (DatabaseGenerated...).

    public class Sites
    {
        [Required, Key, DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None)]
        public int SiteID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Tags { get; set; }
        public string Description { get; set; }
        public string URI { get; set; }
    }

2. Do it using the ModelBuilder in your DbContext.

    public class CMSModels : DbContext
    {
      //public DbSet<ContentTypeModel> ContentType { get; set; }
      //public DbSet<LayoutModel> Layout { get; set; }
      //public DbSet<PageModel> Page { get; set; }
      //public DbSet<PageZoneModel> PageZone { get; set; }
      public DbSet<Sites> Site { get; set; }
      //public DbSet<ZoneContentModel> ZoneContent { get; set; }
      //public DbSet<ZoneTypeModel> ZoneType { get; set; }

      protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
      {
          base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
          modelBuilder.Entity<Sites>().Property(r => r.SiteID) 
                       .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None);
      }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I haven't been using any of this technology for very long so I didn't even know I had to do that. Once again, thank you. –  Sour Lemon Jul 19 '11 at 19:27
    
Splendid. It worked for me as well. Looked everywhere on the net. Could not find it. Googled dot net mvc save key null withnot finding any. I think this has to do with the old battle if you should use natural keys and or surrogate keys. Default today are surrogate. But sometimes the natural keys is so perfect. Like accounting number. –  Patrik Lindström Sep 12 '11 at 9:01
    
Quite a bit late to the party, bit this also helped me. I was wondering if there was another way to denote this. For example, when I denote a key, I use modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>().HasKey(r => new { r.ContactID }); Is there a similar notation for this operation? –  Jeff Dec 4 '12 at 23:19
    
Found a solution. modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>().Property(r => r.ContactID) .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None); –  Jeff Dec 4 '12 at 23:33
1  
Thanks for this. I had just assumed that if I did not specify Identity then it would not auto-gen the ID, but luckily I found your post before too much hair pulling ensued. –  David Hay Apr 15 '13 at 6:12

I think you can understand your problem and solve it reading this article: http://leedumond.com/blog/using-a-guid-as-an-entitykey-in-entity-framework-4/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.