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I have a project coming up that requires me to store information about some music albums. I'm thinking just a simple album table with the following fields:

|   id   |  name  | artist |description|  year  |

But I'm wondering what the best way to store the track list would be. I can either have another field in the album table, and have the tracklist data (track name, track run time) stored as a JSON object or something similar, and then pull it out and parse it in my application, or I can have another table called tracklists with the following fields:

|   id   |  name  | album  | runtime |

and pull it out based on the album field.

How would you go about doing this?

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4 Answers 4

Another table.

call the album field, album_id, and make it a foreign key back to the album table.

Basically, you don't want to store everything in one table.

That will make manipulating the track related data more difficult. Because it's not atomically handling the data. You'd have to mess with the entire field that would contain other data unrelated to what you're wanting to edit, possibly leading to corruption of data.

Another reason is to separate out concepts as well into good abstractions so it's clearly understood by you in the future and other programmers. e.g. Where do I go to get at tracks? Well, I go to the tracks table. Where do I go to manipulate albums? Well, I go to the albums table. etc..

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You should definitely go with the second option. Just think about how you would search for tracks with a json object. This will be much easier with a second table!

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would probably look a little like this (not tested) ?

CREATE TABLE album 
(         
    album_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,         
    description VARCHAR(400),       
    artist VARCHAR(400),
    description VARCHAR(400),
    year_released NUMBER(4),
);

CREATE TABLE track 
(         
    track_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    album_id INT,         
    description VARCHAR(100),           
    order_no NUMBER(3),
    runtime NUMBER(6),
    INDEX albumfk (album_id),
                    FOREIGN KEY (album_id) REFERENCES album(album_id)

);
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I'd break it down like you said and have a one-one relationship on the album id. Much cleaner I think ...

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really? a one-one relationship? –  Sascha Galley Jul 19 '11 at 15:34
    
bah i meant one-many. –  luckytaxi Jul 19 '11 at 16:12

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