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Python's string-literal juxtaposition makes multi-line strings much easier and prettier to write, but when I'm four or five indents deep and want to use the entire row (leading whitespace does not matter), Vim's foldmethod=indent breaks down.

For example:

def getQuotation():
    print "Fetching quotation from the absolutely useless function."
    return ("Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, "
"upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated "
"to the proposition that \"all men are created equal\"")

should be folded as this:

def getQuotation():
+--  4 lines: print "Fetching quotation from the absolutely useless function."--

but instead I get this:

def getQuotation():
+--  2 lines: print "Fetching quotation from the absolutely useless function."--
"upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated "
"to the proposition that \"all men are created equal\"")

I tried setting foldignore=\", but to no avail. Vim's help foldignore offers this to say on the subject:

Used only when 'foldmethod' is "indent". Lines starting with characters in 'foldignore' will get their fold level from surrounding lines. White space is skipped before checking for this character.

Is there something obvious that I'm missing, or will I have to resort to foldmethod=expr, base the foldlevel on the indent, and except the corner cases myself?

EDIT: I've made at least some headway; it turns out that if I add a non-empty line after the strings and "refresh" the indent with set fdm=indent, then the block folds as it's supposed to. Even an empty comment (#) is enough.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried foldmethod=syntax instead, and doing set filetype=python? foldmethod=indent bases folds on indents as the name suggests, so isn't particularly smart when it comes to language specific things. –  actionshrimp Jul 19 '11 at 15:18
1  
That's not a multiline string, that's implicit string concatenation with several substrings. Why don't you try using actual multiline strings, utilizing the line continuation character \ at the end of each section to have on one line in code? Don't know if that will help you, but it's worth a try. ...What the heck, backslash+backtick is an escape code in comments? –  JAB Jul 19 '11 at 15:20
    
@actionshrimp: I was using the syntax folding before, but it just wasn't nearly as effective as indent and defined folds (usually) over broader ranges than I would have liked. –  karan.dodia Jul 19 '11 at 15:51
1  
@JAB: You're right, it's not technically a multi-line string. But your proposed solution doesn't address the issue, which is that vim's folding would still require me to pad out each line to the same indent level, which is not acceptable. –  karan.dodia Jul 19 '11 at 15:51
    
Since it's not a solution for using Vim's indent folding I'm posting it as a comment... I'm using python_ifold plugin (vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=2002) and the described behavior doesn't happen. Maybe you should try it. If you consider it as a solution I can repost it with more informations and details. –  Magnun Leno Jul 19 '11 at 16:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there something obvious that I'm missing, or will I have to resort to foldmethod=expr, base the foldlevel on the indent, and except the corner cases myself?

Short answer: you can't do this with foldmethod=indent, but I found something you can use with foldmethod=expr, so no need to reinvent the wheel. See the long answer.

Long answer

Just a brief review of how foldmethod=indent works...

  • Look for text shifted shiftwidth with whitespace from the edge of the page
  • Insert a new foldlevel
  • De-indenting takes you down foldlevels

Since the text you have is justified at the edge of the screen, anything involving shiftwidth is eventually broken unless you hack it up as you did.

I looked at several different .vimrc configurations before I found something that would work. For a cleaner solution than foldmethod=indent, use foldmethod=expr with the ~/.vimrc I have below. I found it in jneb's bitbucket python-fold repo

As a test, I built a few more cases into your example...

class testclass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.testit = None
    def __repr__(self):
        return "guacamole"

def foobarme():
    assert False
    return 42

def getQuotation():
    print "Fetching quotation from the absolutely useless function."
    return ("Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, "
"upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated "
"to the proposition that \"all men are created equal\"")

Using python-fold at the bottom of my ~/.vimrc yields:

jneb_folded

And when I hit zR to unfold:

jneb_unfolded

FYI, I use Dmitry Vasiliev's python.vim in ~/.vim/syntax/python.vim for python syntax highlights.

I copied jneb's vim script below in case the bitbucket repo disappears...


" Fold routines for python code, version 3.2
" Source: http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=2527
" Last Change: 2009 Feb 25
" Author: Jurjen Bos
" Bug fixes and helpful comments: Grissiom, David Froger, Andrew McNabb

" Principles:
" - a def/class starts a fold
" a line with indent less than the previous def/class ends a fold
" empty lines and comment lines are linked to the previous fold
" comment lines outside a def/class are never folded
" other lines outside a def/class are folded together as a group
" for algorithm, see bottom of script

" - optionally, you can get empty lines between folds, see (***)
" - another option is to ignore non-python files see (**)
" - you can also modify the def/class check,
"    allowing for multiline def and class definitions see (*)

" Note for vim 7 users:
" Vim 6 line numbers always take 8 columns, while vim 7 has a numberwidth variable
" you can change the 8 below to &numberwidth if you have vim 7,
" this is only really useful when you plan to use more than 8 columns (i.e. never)

" Note for masochists trying to read this:
" I wanted to keep the functions short, so I replaced occurences of
" if condition
"     statement
" by
" if condition | statement
" wherever I found that useful

" (*)
" class definitions are supposed to ontain a colon on the same line.
" function definitions are *not* required to have a colon, to allow for multiline defs.
" I you disagree, use instead of the pattern '^\s*\(class\s.*:\|def\s\)'
" to enforce : for defs:                     '^\s*\(class\|def\)\s.*:'
" you'll have to do this in two places.
let s:defpat = '^\s*\(@\|class\s.*:\|def\s\)'

" (**) Ignore non-python files
" Commented out because some python files are not recognized by Vim
"if &filetype != 'python'
"    finish
"endif

setlocal foldmethod=expr
setlocal foldexpr=GetPythonFold(v:lnum)
setlocal foldtext=PythonFoldText()

function! PythonFoldText()
  let fs = v:foldstart
  while getline(fs) =~ '^\s*@' | let fs = nextnonblank(fs + 1)
  endwhile
  let line = getline(fs)
  let nnum = nextnonblank(fs + 1)
  let nextline = getline(nnum)
  "get the document string: next line is ''' or """
  if nextline =~ "^\\s\\+[\"']\\{3}\\s*$"
      let line = line . " " . matchstr(getline(nextnonblank(nnum + 1)), '^\s*\zs.*\ze$')
  "next line starts with qoutes, and has text
  elseif nextline =~ "^\\s\\+[\"']\\{1,3}"
      let line = line." ".matchstr(nextline, "^\\s\\+[\"']\\{1,3}\\zs.\\{-}\\ze['\"]\\{0,3}$")
  elseif nextline =~ '^\s\+pass\s*$'
    let line = line . ' pass'
  endif
  "compute the width of the visible part of the window (see Note above)
  let w = winwidth(0) - &foldcolumn - (&number ? 8 : 0)
  let size = 1 + v:foldend - v:foldstart
  "compute expansion string
  let spcs = '................'
  while strlen(spcs) < w | let spcs = spcs . spcs
  endwhile
  "expand tabs (mail me if you have tabstop>10)
  let onetab = strpart('          ', 0, &tabstop)
  let line = substitute(line, '\t', onetab, 'g')
  return strpart(line.spcs, 0, w-strlen(size)-7).'.'.size.' lines'
endfunction

function! GetBlockIndent(lnum)
    " Auxiliary function; determines the indent level of the surrounding def/class
    " "global" lines are level 0, first def &shiftwidth, and so on
    " scan backwards for class/def that is shallower or equal
    let ind = 100
    let p = a:lnum+1
    while indent(p) >= 0
        let p = p - 1
        " skip empty and comment lines
        if getline(p) =~ '^$\|^\s*#' | continue
        " zero-level regular line
        elseif indent(p) == 0 | return 0
        " skip deeper or equal lines
        elseif indent(p) >= ind || getline(p) =~ '^$\|^\s*#' | continue
        " indent is strictly less at this point: check for def/class
        elseif getline(p) =~ s:defpat && getline(p) !~ '^\s*@'
            " level is one more than this def/class
            return indent(p) + &shiftwidth
        endif
        " shallower line that is neither class nor def: continue search at new level
        let ind = indent(p)
    endwhile
    "beginning of file
    return 0
endfunction

" Clever debug code, use to display text for a given moment the statement is executed:
" call PrintIfCount(6, "Line: ".a:lnum.", indent: ".ind.", previous indent: ".pind)
let s:counter=0
function! PrintIfCount(n,t)
    "Print text the nth time this function is called
    let s:counter = s:counter+1
    if s:counter==a:n | echo a:t
    endif
endfunction

function! GetPythonFold(lnum)
    " Determine folding level in Python source (see "higher foldlevel theory" below)
    let line = getline(a:lnum)
    let ind = indent(a:lnum)
    " Case D***: class and def start a fold
    " If previous line is @, it is not the first
    if line =~ s:defpat && getline(prevnonblank(a:lnum-1)) !~ '^\s*@'
        " let's see if this range of 0 or more @'s end in a class/def
        let n = a:lnum
        while getline(n) =~ '^\s*@' | let n = nextnonblank(n + 1)
        endwhile
        " yes, we have a match: this is the first of a real def/class with decorators
        if getline(n) =~ s:defpat
            return ">".(ind/&shiftwidth+1)
        endif
    " Case E***: empty lines fold with previous
    " (***) change '=' to -1 if you want empty lines/comment out of a fold
    elseif line == '' | return '='
    endif
    " now we need the indent from previous
    let p = prevnonblank(a:lnum-1)
    while p>0 && getline(p) =~ '^\s*#' | let p = prevnonblank(p-1)
    endwhile
    let pind = indent(p)
    " If previous was definition: count as one level deeper
    if getline(p) =~ s:defpat && getline(prevnonblank(a:lnum - 1)) !~ '^\s*@'
        let pind = pind + &shiftwidth
    " if begin of file: take zero
    elseif p==0 | let pind = 0
    endif
    " Case S*=* and C*=*: indent equal
    if ind>0 && ind==pind | return '='
    " Case S*>* and C*>*: indent increase
    elseif ind>pind | return '='
    " All cases with 0 indent
    elseif ind==0
        " Case C*=0*: separate global code blocks
        if pind==0 && line =~ '^#' | return 0
        " Case S*<0* and S*=0*: global code
        elseif line !~'^#'
            " TODO: here we need to check GetBlockIndent(a:lnum) for version 3.3
            " Case S*<0*: new global statement if/while/for/try/with
            if 0<pind && line!~'^else\s*:\|^except.*:\|^elif.*:\|^finally\s*:' | return '>1'
            " Case S*=0*, after level 0 comment
            elseif 0==pind && getline(prevnonblank(a:lnum-1)) =~ '^\s*#' | return '>1'
            " Case S*=0*, other, stay 1
            else | return '='
            endif
        endif
        " Case C*<0= and C*<0<: compute next indent
        let n = nextnonblank(a:lnum+1)
        while n>0 && getline(n) =~'^\s*#' | let n = nextnonblank(n+1)
        endwhile
        " Case C*<0=: split definitions
        if indent(n)==0 | return 0
        " Case C*<0<: shallow comment
        else | return -1
        end
    endif
    " now we really need to compute the actual fold indent
    " do the hard computation
    let blockindent = GetBlockIndent(a:lnum)
    " Case SG<* and CG<*: global code, level 1
    if blockindent==0 | return 1
    endif
    " now we need the indent from next
    let n = nextnonblank(a:lnum+1)
    while n>0 && getline(n) =~'^\s*#' | let n = nextnonblank(n+1)
    endwhile
    let nind = indent(n)
    " Case CR<= and CR<>
    endif
    if line =~ '^\s*#' && ind>=nind | return -1
    " Case CR<<: return next indent
    elseif line =~ '^\s*#' | return nind / &shiftwidth
    " Case SR<*: return actual indent
    else | return blockindent / &shiftwidth
    endif
endfunction

" higher foldlevel theory
" There are five kinds of statements: S (code), D (def/class), E (empty), C (comment)

" Note that a decorator statement (beginning with @) counts as definition,
" but that of a sequence of @,@,@,def only the first one counts
" This means that a definiion only counts if not preceded by a decorator

" There are two kinds of folds: R (regular), G (global statements)

" There are five indent situations with respect to the previous non-emtpy non-comment line:
" > (indent), < (dedent), = (same); < and = combine with 0 (indent is zero)
" Note: if the previous line is class/def, its indent is interpreted as one higher

" There are three indent situations with respect to the next (non-E non-C) line:
" > (dedent), < (indent), = (same)

" Situations (in order of the script):
" stat  fold prev   next
" SDEC  RG   ><=00  ><=
" D     *    *      *     begin fold level if previous is not @: '>'.ind/&sw+1
" E     *    *      *     keep with previous: '='
" S     *    =      *     stays the same: '='
" C     *    =      *     combine with previous: '='
" S     *    >      *     stays the same: '='
" C     *    >      *     combine with previous: '='
" C     *    =0     *     separate blocks: 0
" S     *    <0     *     becomes new level 1: >1 (except except/else: 1)
" S     *    =0     *     stays 1: '=' (after level 0 comment: '>1')
" C     *    <0     =     split definitions: 0
" C     *    <0     <     shallow comment: -1
" C     *    <0     >     [never occurs]
" S     G    <      *     global, not the first: 1
" C     G    <      *     indent isn't 0: 1
" C     R    <      =     foldlevel as computed for next line: -1
" C     R    <      >     foldlevel as computed for next line: -1
" S     R    <      *     compute foldlevel the hard way: use function
" C     R    <      <     foldlevel as computed for this line: use function
share|improve this answer
    
This is a brilliant find, thank you so much! I'm still a little astonished that you went to the trouble of not only locating a vimscript that did the trick, but also implementing a test case and posting screenshots of the answer. Thank you, thank you, thank you. –  karan.dodia Jan 11 '12 at 20:34

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