Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a database table TableA, which has a column 'theDate' for which the datatype in the database is DATE.

When I save a java.util.Date to 'theDate' through GORM it appears to save just the date value when I look at the data in the table by just executing select * from TableA.

However, when I run a query such as:

select * from TableA where theDate = :myDate

No results are found, but if I run something like;

select * from TableA where theDate <= :myDate

I do get results.

So it's like the Time is relevant.

My question is how do I save a Date and query for a Date ignoring the Time completely and just matching on an exact Date only?

Thanks.

note: I have also tried using sql.Date and util.Calendar but to no success.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

clearTime()

You can use clearTime() before saving and before comparing to zero out the time fields:

// zero the time when saving
new MyDomain(theDate: new Date().clearTime()).save()

// zero the target time before comparing
def now = new Date().clearTime()
MyDomain.findAll('SELECT * FROM MyDomain WHERE theDate = :myDate', [myDate: now])

joda-time plugin

An alternative would be to install the joda-time plugin and use the LocalDate type (which only holds date information, no times) instead of Date. For what it's worth, I don't think I've worked on a project with dates without using the Joda plugin. It's completely worth it.

share|improve this answer
    
I used DateGroovyMethods.clearTime in the end. Thanks. –  C0deAttack Jul 22 '11 at 9:29

If you have date saved without clearing you could retrieve it using range, as Jordan H. wrote but in more simple way.

def getResults(Date date) {

    def from = date.clearTime()
    def to = from + 1

    def results = MyDomain.findAll("from MyDomain where dateCreated between :start and :stop" ,[start:from,stop:to])

}
share|improve this answer

Your question may be a duplicate. See Convert datetime in to date. But if anyone has more recent information, that would be great.

If that doesn't help, you can hack it the way I might, with a BETWEEN restriction, e.g.

def today = new Date()
def ymdFmt = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd")
def dateYmd = ymdFmt.format(today)
def dateTimeFormat = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss");
def startDate = dateTimeFormat.parse("${dateYmd} 00:00:00");
def endDate = dateTimeFormat.parse("${dateYmd} 23:59:59");
MyDomain.findAll("from MyDomain where dateCreated between ? and ?", [startDate, endDate])

It's definitely not pretty, but it may get you where you're going.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured it out.

I used DateGroovyMethods.clearTime to clear the time value before saving.

share|improve this answer

You can use the DB type date not datetime , in the filed type

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.