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Suppose I had the following class:

class MyClass {
    public function Talk() {
        $Say = "Something";
        return $Say;
    }
}

I then started an instance of the class:

$Inst = new MyClass();

How can I now call $Say outside MyClass hence, for example, echo it on the document? For example, having something like:

$Said = "He" . $Say
share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I strongly recommend you read through http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.php. It will teach you the fundamentals of OOP in PHP.


In your example, $Say is just another variable declared within Talk()'s scope. It is not a class property.

To make it a class property:

class MyClass {
    public $say = 'Something';

    public function Talk() {
        return $this->say;
    }
}

$inst = new MyClass();
$said = 'He ' . $inst->say;

That defeats the purpose of Talk() however.
The last line ought to be $said = 'He '. $inst->Talk();

share|improve this answer
    
This worked, thank you so much! :D – max0005 Jul 19 '11 at 15:41
    
Just a point of clarification: this would make $say an object property. A declaration like static $say = 'Something'; would make it a class property. – Ryan Jul 19 '11 at 19:39

$say is not a class property. If it was, you would define your class like this:

class MyClass {
    public $say;      
}

It is instead a local variable of the function Talk(). If you want to access it the way that you have the class defined, you would do:

$instance = new MyClass();
$instance->Talk();
share|improve this answer

You'd need to declare that var before your functions, eg

class MyClass {
  public $say;
  function Talk() {
    $this->say = "something";
  }
}

and then

$Said = "He ".$Inst->$say;
share|improve this answer

You need to make the $Say an instant variable of the MyClass class.

class MyClass {
    public $Say
    public function Talk() {
        $this->Say = "Something";
        return $this->Say;
    }
}

You could then access the instance variable from outside the class via $Inst->Say

Additionally it is better practice to encapsulate your class instance variables and use a "getter" method to retrieve the values.

class MyClass {
    private $Say
    public function Talk() {
        $this->Say = "Something";
        return $this->Say;
    }
    public getSay() {
        return $this->Say;
    }
}

$Inst = new MyClass();
echo $Inst->getSay();
share|improve this answer
1  
even better is to use __get and __set to implicitly call getSay so that other developers are allowed the convenience of calling $inst->Say without worrying about calling the accessor or mutator. – zzzzBov Jul 19 '11 at 15:47
    
@zzzzBov great suggestion! – IOInterrupt Jul 19 '11 at 15:48
    
I have a chunk of code for dynamic accessors and mutators. It works in most cases, except where you need access by reference. – zzzzBov Jul 19 '11 at 16:16

You can use

$said = "He" . $Inst->Talk();

in this case, or you can class

class MyClass {
var $say;
public function Talk() {
    $say = "Something";
    $this->say = $say;
    return $say;
}
}

and call

$said = "He" . $Inst->say;
share|improve this answer
    
the $Say variable is only accessible in that function - it must be converted to a property first in order to do that – hex4 Jul 19 '11 at 15:40

The best practices of oop is NEVER have public properties in your class. The best way to manipulate properties of your class is to have separate methods that will return the value of the properties and set the value of the properties. So

class MyClass {
    private $say;

    // common setter, invoked when we trying to set properties as they are public
    public function __set($name, $value) {
        $methodname = 'set' . ucfirst(strtolower($name));
        if (method_exists($this, $methodname)) {
            $this->$methodname($value);
        } else {
            throw new Exception ('There is no "' . $name . '" property in "' . __CLASS__ . '" class');
        }
    }

    // common getter, invoked when we trying to get properties as they are public
    public function __get($name) {
        $methodname = 'get' . ucfirst(strtolower($name));
        if (method_exists($this, $methodname)) {
            return $this->$methodname();
        } else {
            throw new Exception ('There is no "' . $name . '" property in "' . __CLASS__ . '" class');
        }
    }

    // setter for out private property $say, invoked by common setter when colling $a->say = "something";
    public function setSay($value) {
        $this->say = $value;
    }

    // getter for out private property $say, invoked by common getter when colling $a->say;
    public function getSay() {
        return $this->say;
    }

    public function Talk($monologue) {
        $this->say = (!empty($monologue))?$this->say:$monologue;
        return $this->say;
    }

}

So now you can access your private properties as they are public, and do all neccessary checks to not get bad values be stored in them. Like that:

$a = new MyClass;
$a->say = "Hello my friends !";
$a->Talk();
$a->Talk("Good bye !");
echo $a->say;

Or like that:

$a = new MyClass;
$a->setSay("Hello my friends !");
$a->Talk();
$a->Talk("Good bye !");
echo $a->getSay();

For more security, you can make setSay and getSay methods private, but then the second piece of code won't work.

share|improve this answer
    
Why should I not have public properties in my classes? – max0005 Jul 19 '11 at 16:20
1  
Because if you develop big system, and some developers after you will use your classes and will be able to assign values to properties directly, that could cause unpredictable behavior of whole the system. And, when you have special methods to assign values, you can clean the data and control what value will eventually be stored in the property. – Vitaliy Lebedev Jul 20 '11 at 7:35
    
@Vitality - Got it, thanks! ;D – max0005 Jul 20 '11 at 7:55

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