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In other words, does the following make a difference:

this:

using a;
using b;
using c; 

public class foo {
  public void doStuff() {
    // do some stuff utilizing classes from a, b, and c.
  }
}

Versus this:

public class foo {
  public void doStuff() {
    bar.doStuff();
  }
}

together with:

using a;
using b;
using c;

public static class bar {
  public static void doStuff() {
    // do some stuff utilizing classes from a, b, and c
  }
}

Assuming foo is a class that is used and passed around a lot, serialized/deserialized often, etc. However the doStuff() method is called infrequently. Is there any performance advantage at all in breaking it out into the second/third snippets above?

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1  
I has to give you +1 just for correctly calling it the using directive rather than mis-calling it the using statement :) –  Marc Gravell Jul 19 '11 at 15:42
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No. using is merely about which simple names you can use in the source file in which the using declaration appears.

Basically, using N; says to the compiler "hey, if I type the simple name Foo in this source file, and you can't find anything named Foo in scope, can you check if there is anything named Foo in the namespace N?" Thanks!

That is, you can leave off the using and reference everything by it's fully-qualified name and you haven't changed the IL output by the compiler at all.

Is there any performance advantage at all in breaking it out into the second/third snippets above?

Per the above explanation, no.

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And even then it is just a convenience shorthand; you can always use the fully-qualified name (with :: if needed) –  Marc Gravell Jul 19 '11 at 15:40
    
Thank you sirs. Does this also imply that there is no advantage to not referencing the classes from a, b, and c in my object's class file? i.e. at runtime the a,b,c assemblies are referenced optimally either way? –  mikey Jul 19 '11 at 15:50
    
@mikey: As far as a I know, the compiler drops referenced assemblies that are not used. That is, they are not included in the metadata of the assembly, and are therefore not loaded. –  Jason Jul 19 '11 at 15:56
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The using directive is just a way to not have to qualify your classes. So instead of System.Console.Beep() you can just use

using System;
Console.Beep()

However, the referenced assemblies included in your project do effect increased overall binary sizes.

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So the assemblies are not referenced unless I reference them via the project or unless they are actually referenced in the code. The using directive doesn't actually go ahead and tell the compiler to reference them, only if they are actually used? Nice to know I've been removing "using System.Linq;" from my classes for no reason ;) –  mikey Jul 19 '11 at 15:59
    
Yes, the using directive does not tell the compiler to include referenced assemblies. by referencing them in the project, however, your telling the csc compiler where to find the assembly to link to when compiling. (ie. what to use as for the /r switches.) The referenced assemblies will get copied to the bin/{Release,Debug}/ folder whether they are actually used by your code or not. –  Martin Neal Jul 19 '11 at 17:45
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