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I'm currently working on a MVC.NET 3 application; I recently attended a course by "Uncle Bob" Martin which has inspired me (shamed me?) into taking a hard look at my current development practice, particularly my refactoring habits.

So: a number of my routes conform to:

{controller}/{action}/{type}

Where type typically determines the type of ActionResult to be returned, e.g:

public class ExportController
{
    public ActionResult Generate(String type, String parameters)
    {
        switch (type)
        {
            case "csv":
            //do something
            case "html":
            //do something else
            case "json":
            //do yet another thing
        }    
    }
}

Has anyone successfully applied the "replace switch with polymorhism" refactoring to code like this? Is this even a good idea? Would be great to hear your experiences with this kind of refactoring.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you wanted to "replace switch with polymorphism" in this case, you could create three overloaded Generate() ActionResult methods. Using custom model binding, make the Type parameter a strongly-typed enum called DataFormat (or whatever.) Then you'd have:

 public ActionResult Generate(DataFormat.CSV, String parameters)
    {
    }

 public ActionResult Generate(DataFormat.HTML, String parameters)
    {
    }

 public ActionResult Generate(DataFormat.JSON, String parameters)
    {
    }

Once you get to this point, you can refactor further to get the repetition out of your Controller.

share|improve this answer
    
hi Dave this looks exactly like what I'm looking for. Thanks for the tip on custom model binding, I think it'll be very useful elsewhere as well. – iagosabel Jul 21 '11 at 22:16
    
Care to elaborate? if DataFormat.CSV is a value, then your methods are invalid c#. – Kugel Jun 3 '12 at 14:37
    
And how exactly would ModelBinder determine which of these overloads is correct? – Kugel Jun 3 '12 at 14:40

The way I am looking at it, this controller action is screaming for a custom action result:

public class MyActionResult : ActionResult
{
    public object Model { get; private set; }

    public MyActionResult(object model)
    {
        if (model == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("Haven't you heard of view models???");
        }
        Model = model;
    }

    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        // TODO: You could also use the context.HttpContext.Request.ContentType
        // instead of this type route parameter
        var typeValue = context.Controller.ValueProvider.GetValue("type");
        var type = typeValue != null ? typeValue.AttemptedValue : null;
        if (type == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("Please specify a type");
        }

        var response = context.HttpContext.Response;
        if (string.Equals("json", type, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        {
            var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            response.ContentType = "text/json";
            response.Write(serializer.Serialize(Model));
        }
        else if (string.Equals("xml", type, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        {
            var serializer = new XmlSerializer(Model.GetType());
            response.ContentType = "text/xml";
            serializer.Serialize(response.Output, Model);
        }
        else if (string.Equals("csv", type, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        {
            // TODO:
        }
        else
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException(
                string.Format(
                    "Sorry but \"{0}\" is not a supported. Try again later", 
                    type
                )
            );
        }
    }
}

and then:

public ActionResult Generate(string parameters)
{
    MyViewModel model = _repository.GetMeTheModel(parameters);
    return new MyActionResult(model);
}

A controller should not care about how to serialize the data. That's not his responsibility. A controller shouldn't be doing any plumbing like this. He should focus on fetching domain models, mapping them to view models and passing those view models to view results.

share|improve this answer
    
hi Darin, thank you for the answer, I like the fact that the 'plumbing' aspect is elegantly moved out of the controller. However - strictly speaking, the original switch hasn't really been refactored - it's been moved into a different structure :) I can see how this would be very useful to us in several places, so thank you! – iagosabel Jul 21 '11 at 22:15

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