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Lets say I have a struct with more than hundred elements with complex names. And I am passing a struct of the struct type described to a function using ref, like this:

void Foo(ref mystruct a)
{
   "I want to modify members or fields of struct a, like this:
   a[0] = 10;
   a[100] = 11;"
}

Thanks!

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9  
Do not do this. – Yossarian Jul 19 '11 at 16:02
1  
Why would you want to have a struct with 100 fields? – Jon Skeet Jul 19 '11 at 16:03
1  
You could use reflection to ascertain the entries, but do not do this. It is wrong. @Yossarian is right. – Schroedingers Cat Jul 19 '11 at 16:03
4  
A: mutable structs are evil B: structs should be sensibly sized (ref is a hacky workaround). Unless you have a very specialised scenario, this isn't a great way to design it... – Marc Gravell Jul 19 '11 at 16:04
3  
I'm pretty sure this is a port of some legacy C code (as your other question was.) Part of porting is realizing when something was done in a poor way and fixing it. In this case, an array makes much more sense than keeping the struct around. As SLaks recommended in the previous question, wrap the array in a class with appropriate property getters/setters if you feel the need. – dlev Jul 19 '11 at 16:05

Maybe you should re-examine your choice of data structure. Perhaps a dictionary would be better suited?

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It's a strange request as you're expecting the order of the fields to be significant, but I suspect you could do this through Reflection or the TypeDescriptor.

I would revise my code sample below to use proper property names with constants, but if you know the property names, just call the properties directly and save yourself from the reflection overhead. Otherwise, use a dictionary with constants.

/* yeah, probably not a good idea.
public void Foo(ref MyStruct a)
{
    TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(a)[0].SetValue(a, 10);
}
*/
share|improve this answer
3  
Properties are explicitly not reported in any defined order. MSDN is clear about this. – Marc Gravell Jul 19 '11 at 16:07
    
Thanks Marc, and the link to support this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aky14axb.aspx – bryanbcook Jul 19 '11 at 16:13
    
wth? people are down voting my updated copy that recognizes this as a bad idea? thanks guys, you are all scholars. – bryanbcook Jul 19 '11 at 16:20
1  
+1 for the update. – Ed Bayiates Jul 19 '11 at 16:25
    
Cheers, @AresAvatar – bryanbcook Jul 19 '11 at 16:41

While you can use the struct LayoutKind attribute to force simple types to share memory like a "C" Union, you still cannot make an array share memory with simple types because ref types (aka garbage collected types) don't work with the attribute. The concept of C shortcuts like memset of a struct don't map to C# in any way, because C# is a safe language. In fact, that is a Good Thing. Many bugs have come from these kinds of memory addressing shortcuts.

If you want to simulate this behavior, create a class with properties that map to specific members of a backing array, but again, why do this? There are much better data structures to suit your needs in C# such as List, SortedList, Dictionary, Map, Stack, etc. that are safe.

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I will probably burn in hell, but...

Obviously horrible and not recommended and only works if your fields are all ints with default layout...

internal class Program
{
    private struct MyStruct
    {
        //Must be all Int32
        public int Field1, Field2, Field3;
    }

    private static void Main()
    {
        MyStruct str = new MyStruct {Field1 = 666, Field2 = 667, Field3 = 668};

        int[] array = ToArray(str);

        array[0] = 100;
        array[1] = 200;
        array[2] = 300;

        str = FromArray(array);
    }

    private static int[] ToArray(MyStruct str)
    {
        IntPtr ptr = IntPtr.Zero;

        try
        {
            int size = GetInt32ArraySize(str);
            int[] array = new int[size];
            ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
            Marshal.StructureToPtr(str, ptr, true);
            Marshal.Copy(ptr, array, 0, size);
            return array;
        }
        finally
        {
            Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);
        }
    }

    private static MyStruct FromArray(int[] arr)
    {
        IntPtr ptr = IntPtr.Zero;

        try
        {
            MyStruct str = new MyStruct();
            int size = GetInt32ArraySize(str);
            ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
            Marshal.Copy(arr, 0, ptr, size);
            str = (MyStruct)Marshal.PtrToStructure(ptr, str.GetType());
            return str;
        }
        finally
        {
            Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);
        }
    }

    private static int GetInt32ArraySize(MyStruct str)
    {
        return Marshal.SizeOf(str) / Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Int32));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can do this in .NET BUT as several others have already posted: DO NOT DO IT.

Some Code

a.GetType().GetProperties() [0].SetValue (a, newvalue, null);

EDIT: several reasons not to do this:

  • the order is not guaranteed !

  • what happens when there are no properties ?

  • what happens with readonly properties ?

So again: DO NOT DO THIS!

share|improve this answer
    
As has been pointed out, you cannot guarantee what order properties are returned in when using reflection, so you cannot use ordinals. – Tim Lloyd Jul 19 '11 at 16:30
1  
In case you didn't read the first line - I wrote "DO NOT DO IT". I added some explanation to my answer... – Yahia Jul 19 '11 at 16:35
    
I did read the first line, it didn't say why not to to do it, plus someone answered with exactly the same answer 22 minutes before you... – Tim Lloyd Jul 19 '11 at 16:40

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