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I want an easy way to create multiple directories in C++/Linux.

For example I want to save a file lola.file in the directory:

/tmp/a/b/c

but if the directories are not there I want them to be created automagically. A working example would be perfect.

share|improve this question
    
C++ does not have any built-in facilities for creating directories and trees per se. You will have to use C and system calls or an external library like Boost. C and system calls will be platform dependent. –  jww Jan 20 at 14:22
1  
@noloader Thanks a lot man.. but I think after 4 years I pretty much got my answer as you can see bellow in 13 different ways... –  Lipis Jan 20 at 17:47
    
Yeah, I was surprised no one explicitly stated you cannot do it in C++ (assuming you wanted a portable method in C++ that worked on Linux). But you probably knew that ;). There were a lot of good suggestions for non-portable C code, though. –  jww Jan 20 at 18:33

13 Answers 13

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Here's a C function that can be compiled with C++ compilers.

/*
@(#)File:           $RCSfile: mkpath.c,v $
@(#)Version:        $Revision: 1.13 $
@(#)Last changed:   $Date: 2012/07/15 00:40:37 $
@(#)Purpose:        Create all directories in path
@(#)Author:         J Leffler
@(#)Copyright:      (C) JLSS 1990-91,1997-98,2001,2005,2008,2012
*/

/*TABSTOP=4*/

#include "jlss.h"
#include "emalloc.h"

#include <errno.h>
#ifdef HAVE_UNISTD_H
#include <unistd.h>
#endif /* HAVE_UNISTD_H */
#include <string.h>
#include "sysstat.h"    /* Fix up for Windows - inc mode_t */

typedef struct stat Stat;

#ifndef lint
/* Prevent over-aggressive optimizers from eliminating ID string */
const char jlss_id_mkpath_c[] = "@(#)$Id: mkpath.c,v 1.13 2012/07/15 00:40:37 jleffler Exp $";
#endif /* lint */

static int do_mkdir(const char *path, mode_t mode)
{
    Stat            st;
    int             status = 0;

    if (stat(path, &st) != 0)
    {
        /* Directory does not exist. EEXIST for race condition */
        if (mkdir(path, mode) != 0 && errno != EEXIST)
            status = -1;
    }
    else if (!S_ISDIR(st.st_mode))
    {
        errno = ENOTDIR;
        status = -1;
    }

    return(status);
}

/**
** mkpath - ensure all directories in path exist
** Algorithm takes the pessimistic view and works top-down to ensure
** each directory in path exists, rather than optimistically creating
** the last element and working backwards.
*/
int mkpath(const char *path, mode_t mode)
{
    char           *pp;
    char           *sp;
    int             status;
    char           *copypath = STRDUP(path);

    status = 0;
    pp = copypath;
    while (status == 0 && (sp = strchr(pp, '/')) != 0)
    {
        if (sp != pp)
        {
            /* Neither root nor double slash in path */
            *sp = '\0';
            status = do_mkdir(copypath, mode);
            *sp = '/';
        }
        pp = sp + 1;
    }
    if (status == 0)
        status = do_mkdir(path, mode);
    FREE(copypath);
    return (status);
}

#ifdef TEST

#include <stdio.h>

/*
** Stress test with parallel running of mkpath() function.
** Before the EEXIST test, code would fail.
** With the EEXIST test, code does not fail.
**
** Test shell script
** PREFIX=mkpath.$$
** NAME=./$PREFIX/sa/32/ad/13/23/13/12/13/sd/ds/ww/qq/ss/dd/zz/xx/dd/rr/ff/ff/ss/ss/ss/ss/ss/ss/ss/ss
** : ${MKPATH:=mkpath}
** ./$MKPATH $NAME &
** [...repeat a dozen times or so...]
** ./$MKPATH $NAME &
** wait
** rm -fr ./$PREFIX/
*/

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int             i;

    for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 20; j++)
        {
            if (fork() == 0)
            {
                int rc = mkpath(argv[i], 0777);
                if (rc != 0)
                    fprintf(stderr, "%d: failed to create (%d: %s): %s\n",
                            (int)getpid(), errno, strerror(errno), argv[i]);
                exit(rc == 0 ? EXIT_SUCCESS : EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
        }
        int status;
        int fail = 0;
        while (wait(&status) != -1)
        {
            if (WEXITSTATUS(status) != 0)
                fail = 1;
        }
        if (fail == 0)
            printf("created: %s\n", argv[i]);
    }
    return(0);
}

#endif /* TEST */

The macros STRDUP() and FREE() are error-checking versions of strdup() and free(), declared in emalloc.h (and implemented in emalloc.c and estrdup.c). The "sysstat.h" header deals with broken versions of <sys/stat.h> and can be replaced by <sys/stat.h> on modern Unix systems (but there were many issues back in 1990). And "jlss.h" declares mkpath().

The change between v1.12 (previous) and v1.13 (above) is the test for EEXIST in do_mkdir(). This was pointed out as necessary by Switch — thank you, Switch. The test code has been upgraded and reproduced the problem on a MacBook Pro (2.3GHz Intel Core i7, running Mac OS X 10.7.4), and suggests that the problem is fixed in the revision (but testing can only show the presence of bugs, never their absence).

(You are hereby given permission to use this code for any purpose with attribution.)

share|improve this answer
    
Ok... the result of that one exactly what I wanted..! Can someone tell me if this is faster than system("mkdir -p /tmp/a/b/c").. cause this is so much easier :) –  Lipis Mar 23 '09 at 21:10
1  
It surely is faster than system. System has a lot of overhead involved. Basically, the process has to be forked, then at least two binaries have to be loaded (one will probably be in cache already), on of which will be yet another fork of the other, ... –  ypnos Mar 23 '09 at 21:55
1  
I forgot: And then "mkdir -p" will do at least the same as the code posted above! –  ypnos Mar 23 '09 at 21:56
3  
There's a subtle race condition in this code that I actually hit. It only happens when multiple programs start up simultaneously and make the same folder path. The fix is to add if (errno != EEXIST) { status = -1; } when mkdir fails. –  Switch Jul 14 '12 at 23:57
2  
@Switch: Thanks. That's the trouble with using stat() before mkdir(); it is a TOCTOU (time of check, time of use) problem. I tried tickling the bug with a shell script running 13 processes in background creating the same 29-element path, and didn't manage to hit it. Then I hacked the test program to fork 20 times and have each child try, and that managed to hit the bug. The fixed code will have if (mkdir(path, mode) != 0 && errno != EEXIST) status = -1;. That doesn't show the bug. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 15 '12 at 0:43

Easy with boost.Filesystem : create_directories

#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>

//...

boost::filesystem::create_directories("/tmp/a/b/c");
share|improve this answer
6  
Well, most boost libraries are header-only, meaning there is no overhead besides what you use. In the case of Boost.Filesystem, it requires compiling though. On my disk, the compiled library weighs ~60KB. –  Benoît Mar 23 '09 at 20:54
1  
@Lipis: please precise what your embedded system is. I believe it should be available on pretty much every linux distribution. –  Benoît Mar 23 '09 at 20:56
1  
I'm starting to like Boost more and more every hour :) –  queueoverflow May 5 '13 at 11:18
4  
Regarding on the C++11 compilers mentioned by @danijar, the comment here made it clearer: The <filesystem> header is not part of C++11; it is a proposal for C++ TR2 based on the Boost.Filesystem library. Visual C++ 2012 includes an implementation of the proposed library. –  Chunliang Lyu Sep 4 '13 at 7:49
3  
boost::filesystem is not header-only: stackoverflow.com/questions/13604090/… –  ftvs Nov 1 '13 at 3:15
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

int status;
...
status = mkdir("/tmp/a/b/c", S_IRWXU | S_IRWXG | S_IROTH | S_IXOTH);

From here. You may have to do separate mkdirs for /tmp, /tmp/a, /tmp/a/b/ and then /tmp/a/b/c because there isn't an equivalent of the -p flag in the C api. Be sure and ignore the EEXISTS errno while you're doing the upper level ones.

share|improve this answer
    
Fun fact: At least Solaris and HP/UX have mkdirp(), although it's clearly not optimal for portability. –  Martin Carpenter Mar 23 '09 at 20:21
    
that's the point.. that I don't want to call all these functions separately. –  Lipis Mar 23 '09 at 20:31
    
Calling mkdir a few times will be way, way faster than calling system once. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 23 '09 at 20:38
system("mkdir -p /tmp/a/b/c")

is the shortest way i can think of.

It's not cross-platform but will work under Linux.

share|improve this answer
    
IF your going to give the solution as a shell command, it would be well to mention system (3) –  dmckee Mar 23 '09 at 20:19
    
True, i just updated the post. –  ChristopheD Mar 23 '09 at 20:26
    
I don't believe that' faster than this method. –  einpoklum Mar 22 at 12:42

You said "C++" but everyone here seems to be thinking "Bash shell."

Check out the source code to gnu mkdir; then you can see how to implement the shell commands in C++.

share|improve this answer
1  
What do you mean "everyone"? –  Paul Tomblin Mar 23 '09 at 20:20
    
Well system("mkdir...") should do the trick on linux. It's not cross-platform though. –  ChristopheD Mar 23 '09 at 20:21
2  
teaching a man how to catch a fish: +1 –  Martin Carpenter Mar 23 '09 at 20:24
3  
ChristopheD: system() is rarely the correct answer. –  Martin Carpenter Mar 23 '09 at 20:27
    
I second what @MartinCarpenter says –  MadPumpkin Dec 18 '11 at 0:01

This is similar to the previous but works forward through the string instead of recursively backwards. Leaves errno with the right value for last failure. If there's a leading slash, there's an extra time through the loop which could have been avoided via one find_first_of() outside the loop or by detecting the leading / and setting pre to 1. The efficiency is the same whether we get set up by a first loop or a pre loop call, and the complexity would be (slightly) higher when using the pre-loop call.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sys/stat.h>

int
mkpath(std::string s,mode_t mode)
{
    size_t pre=0,pos;
    std::string dir;
    int mdret;

    if(s[s.size()-1]!='/'){
        // force trailing / so we can handle everything in loop
        s+='/';
    }

    while((pos=s.find_first_of('/',pre))!=std::string::npos){
        dir=s.substr(0,pos++);
        pre=pos;
        if(dir.size()==0) continue; // if leading / first time is 0 length
        if((mdret=mkdir(dir.c_str(),mode)) && errno!=EEXIST){
            return mdret;
        }
    }
    return mdret;
}

int main()
{
    int mkdirretval;
    mkdirretval=mkpath("./foo/bar",0755);
    std::cout << mkdirretval << '\n';

}
share|improve this answer

Since this post is ranking high in Google for "Create Directory Tree", I am going to post an answer that will work for Windows — this will work using Win32 API compiled for UNICODE or MBCS. This is ported from Mark's code above.

Since this is Windows we are working with, directory separators are BACK-slashes, not forward slashes. If you would rather have forward slashes, change '\\' to '/'

It will work with:

c:\foo\bar\hello\world

and

c:\foo\bar\hellp\world\

(i.e.: does not need trailing slash, so you don't have to check for it.)

Before saying "Just use SHCreateDirectoryEx() in Windows", note that SHCreateDirectoryEx() is deprecated and could be removed at any time from future versions of Windows.

bool CreateDirectoryTree(LPCTSTR szPathTree, LPSECURITY_ATTRIBUTES lpSecurityAttributes = NULL){
    bool bSuccess = false;
    const BOOL bCD = CreateDirectory(szPathTree, lpSecurityAttributes);
    DWORD dwLastError = 0;
    if(!bCD){
        dwLastError = GetLastError();
    }else{
        return true;
    }
    switch(dwLastError){
        case ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS:
            bSuccess = true;
            break;
        case ERROR_PATH_NOT_FOUND:
            {
                TCHAR szPrev[MAX_PATH] = {0};
                LPCTSTR szLast = _tcsrchr(szPathTree,'\\');
                _tcsnccpy(szPrev,szPathTree,(int)(szLast-szPathTree));
                if(CreateDirectoryTree(szPrev,lpSecurityAttributes)){
                    bSuccess = CreateDirectory(szPathTree,lpSecurityAttributes)!=0;
                    if(!bSuccess){
                        bSuccess = (GetLastError()==ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS);
                    }
                }else{
                    bSuccess = false;
                }
            }
            break;
        default:
            bSuccess = false;
            break;
    }

    return bSuccess;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's funny that you added a windows answer to a question about how to do something in linux;) –  Patrick Jul 17 '13 at 3:46
1  
@Patrick -- why not read my post before posting a smart-ass comment. –  Andrew Heinlein Oct 29 '13 at 0:41
1  
Sorry you took it that way. I just thought it was funny. Did not in any way mean it to be smart ass, and I did read your post. –  Patrick Oct 22 at 4:29
mkdir -p /dir/to/the/file

touch /dir/to/the/file/thefile.ending
share|improve this answer
    
the -p option is what I'm looking for. Thanks! –  asgs Feb 14 '12 at 19:43
bool mkpath( std::string path )
{
    bool bSuccess = false;
    int nRC = ::mkdir( path.c_str(), 0775 );
    if( nRC == -1 )
    {
        switch( errno )
        {
            case ENOENT:
                //parent didn't exist, try to create it
                if( mkpath( path.substr(0, path.find_last_of('/')) ) )
                    //Now, try to create again.
                    bSuccess = 0 == ::mkdir( path.c_str(), 0775 );
                else
                    bSuccess = false;
                break;
            case EEXIST:
                //Done!
                bSuccess = true;
                break;
            default:
                bSuccess = false;
                break;
        }
    }
    else
        bSuccess = true;
    return bSuccess;
}
share|improve this answer

The others got you the right answer, but I thought I'd demonstrate another neat thing you can do:

mkdir -p /tmp/a/{b,c}/d

Will create the following paths:

/tmp/a/b/d
/tmp/a/c/d

The braces allow you to create multiple directories at once on the same level of the hierarchy, whereas the -p option means "create parent directories as needed".

share|improve this answer
    
after seeing Paul's answer, I realize that I (and a lot of other people) misunderstood the question... –  rmeador Mar 23 '09 at 20:17
    
and I think rmeador is right :) –  Lipis Mar 23 '09 at 20:20
    
If somebody can Just update this by changing to system("mkdir -p /tmp/a/{b,c}/d"), cause the questions is not about doing it in shell.. but through C++. –  Lipis Mar 23 '09 at 20:38
1  
Is the "{a,b}" format shell-dependent? –  Andy Mar 23 '09 at 20:39
    
I think {a,b} will work in both sh-derived and csh-derived shells. I'm not sure if it will work in a system() command, though. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 23 '09 at 20:45

So I need mkdirp() today, and found the solutions on this page overly complicated. Hence I wrote a fairly short snippet, that easily be copied in for others who stumble upon this thread an wonder why we need so many lines of code.

mkdirp.h

#ifndef MKDIRP_H
#define MKDIRP_H

#include <sys/stat.h>

#define DEFAULT_MODE      S_IRWXU | S_IRGRP |  S_IXGRP | S_IROTH | S_IXOTH

/** Utility function to create directory tree */
bool mkdirp(const char* path, mode_t mode = DEFAULT_MODE);

#endif // MKDIRP_H

mkdirp.cpp

#include <errno.h>

bool mkdirp(const char* path, mode_t mode) {
  // const cast for hack
  char* p = const_cast<char*>(path);

  // Do mkdir for each slash until end of string or error
  while (*p != '\0') {
    // Skip first character
    p++;

    // Find first slash or end
    while(*p != '\0' && *p != '/') p++;

    // Remember value from p
    char v = *p;

    // Write end of string at p
    *p = '\0';

    // Create folder from path to '\0' inserted at p
    if(mkdir(path, mode) == -1 && errno != EEXIST) {
      *p = v;
      return false;
    }

    // Restore path to it's former glory
    *p = v;
  }

  return true;
}

If you don't like const casting and temporarily modifying the string, just do a strdup() and free() it afterwards.

share|improve this answer
    
Posted to a gist too, so I don't forget where I put it next time a need it :) gist.github.com/jonasfj/7797272 –  jonasfj Dec 4 '13 at 23:11
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>   

using namespace std;


void mkdirTree(string sub, string dir){
    if (sub.length() == 0)
        return;

    int i=0;
    for (i; i<sub.length(); i++){
        dir += sub[i];
        if (sub[i] == '/')
            break;
    }
    mkdir(dir.c_str(), S_IRWXU | S_IRWXG | S_IROTH | S_IXOTH);
    if (i+1 < sub.length())
        mkdirTree(sub.substr(i+1), dir);
}

int main(){
    string new_dir = "a/b/c";
    mkdirTree(new_dir, "");
}
share|improve this answer

I know it's an old question but it shows up high on google search results and the answers provided here are not really in C++ or are a bit too complicated.

Please note that in my example createDirTree() is very simple because all the heavy lifting (error checking, path validation) needs to be done by createDir() anyway. Also createDir() should return true if directory already exists or the whole thing won't work.

Here's how I would do that in C++:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

bool createDir(const std::string dir)
{
    std::cout << "Make sure dir is a valid path, it does not exist and create it: "
              << dir << std::endl;
    return true;
}

bool createDirTree(const std::string full_path)
{
    size_t pos = 0;
    bool ret_val = true;

    while(ret_val == true && pos != std::string::npos)
    {
        pos = full_path.find('/', pos + 1);
        ret_val = createDir(full_path.substr(0, pos));
    }

    return ret_val;
}

int main()
{
    createDirTree("/tmp/a/b/c");
    return 0;
}

Of course createDir() function will be system-specific and there are already enough examples in other answers how to write it for linux, so I decided to skip it.

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