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I'd appreciate suggestions/insights on how I can leverage Clojure to efficiently parse and compare two files. There are two (log) files that contain employee attendance; from these files I need to determine all the days that two employees worked the same times, in the same department. Below are examples of the log files.

Note: each file has differing number of entries.

First File:

Employee Id     Name         Time In          Time Out          Dept.
mce0518         Jon     2011-01-01 06:00  2011-01-01 14:00       ER
mce0518         Jon     2011-01-02 06:00  2011-01-01 14:00       ER
mce0518         Jon     2011-01-04 06:00  2011-01-01 13:00       ICU
mce0518         Jon     2011-01-05 06:00  2011-01-01 13:00       ICU
mce0518         Jon     2011-01-05 17:00  2011-01-01 23:00       ER

Second File:

Employee Id     Name            Time In           Time Out          Dept.
pdm1705         Jane        2011-01-01 06:00  2011-01-01 14:00       ER
pdm1705         Jane        2011-01-02 06:00  2011-01-01 14:00       ER
pdm1705         Jane        2011-01-05 06:00  2011-01-01 13:00       ER
pdm1705         Jane        2011-01-05 17:00  2011-01-01 23:00       ER
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2 Answers 2

if you are not going to do it periodically,


(defn data-seq [f]
  (with-open [rdr (java.io.BufferedReader. 
                   (java.io.FileReader. f))]
    (let [s (rest (line-seq rdr))]
      (doall (map seq (map #(.split % "\\s+") s))))))

(defn same-time? [a b]
  (let [a  (drop 2 a)
        b  (drop 2 b)]
    (= a b)))

(let [f1 (data-seq "f1.txt")
      f2 (data-seq "f2.txt")]

  (reduce (fn[h v]
            (let [f2 (filter #(same-time? v %) f2)]
              (if (empty? f2)
                h
                (conj h [(first v) (map first f2)]))))  [] f1) 
  )

will get you,

 [["mce0518" ("pdm1705")] ["mce0518" ("pdm1705")] ["mce0518" ("pdm1705")]]
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The function name same-time? is a bit deceptive since it checks on both time and department. –  Maurits Rijk Jul 20 '11 at 8:48
    
yeah, I was going to handle comparison in two calls but then figured out drop 2 then = will do. –  Hamza Yerlikaya Jul 20 '11 at 15:48

I came to somewhat shorter and (IMHO) more readable version

(use ; moar toolz - moar fun
  '[clojure.contrib.duck-streams :only (reader)]
  '[clojure.string :only (split)]
  '[clojure.contrib.str-utils :only (str-join)]
  '[clojure.set :only (intersection)])

(defn read-presence [filename]
  (with-open [rdr (reader filename)] ; file will be securely (always) closed after use
    (apply hash-set ; make employee's hash-set
      (map #(str-join "--" (drop 2 (split % #" [ ]+"))) ; right-to-left: split row by spaces then forget two first columns then join using "--"
        (drop 1 ; ommit first line
          (line-seq rdr)))))) ; read file content line-by-line

(intersection (read-presence "a.in") (read-presence "b.in")) ; now it's simple!
;result: #{"2011-01-01 06:00--2011-01-01 14:00--ER" "2011-01-02 06:00--2011-01-01 14:00--ER" "2011-01-05 17:00--2011-01-01 23:00--ER"}

Assuming a.in and b.in are your files. I also assumed you'll have one hash-set for each employee -- (naive) generalization to N employees would need next six lines:

(def employees ["greg.txt" "allison.txt" "robert.txt" "eric.txt" "james.txt" "lisa.txt"])
(for [a employees b employees :when (and
                                      (= a (first (sort [a b]))) ; thou shall compare greg with james ONCE
                                      (not (= a b)))] ; thou shall not compare greg with greg
  (str-join " -- " ; well, it's not pretty... nor pink at least
    [a b (intersection (read-presence a) (read-presence b))]))
;result: ("a.in -- b.in -- #{\"2011-01-01 06:00--2011-01-01 14:00--ER\" \"2011-01-02 06:00--2011-01-01 14:00--ER\" \"2011-01-05 17:00--2011-01-01 23:00--ER\"}")

Actually this loop is sooo ugly and it doesn't memorize intermediate results... To be improved.

--edit--

I knew there must be something elegant in core or contrib!

(use '[clojure.contrib.combinatorics :only (combinations)])

(def employees ["greg.txt" "allison.txt" "robert.txt" "eric.txt" "james.txt" "lisa.txt"])
(def employee-map (apply conj (for [e employees] {e (read-presence e)})))
(map (fn [[a b]] [a b (intersection (employee-map a) (employee-map b))])
  (combinations employees 2))
;result: (["a.in" "b.in" #{"2011-01-01 06:00--2011-01-01 14:00--ER" "2011-01-02 06:00--2011-01-01 14:00--ER" "2011-01-05 17:00--2011-01-01 23:00--ER"}])

Now it's memorized (parsed data in employee-map), general and... lazy :D

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