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In the below perl script, I check my folder name (which is in the date format like 11-08-31) with the current date. If it matches, I process the folder. It also checks the previous day folder if there is no folder in today's date. I already asked this type of question here but I need to make some changes here and add new features as well:

  • The script checks for the previous date if todays not find. But I need to check if the previous date has already been processed or not so that I donot process it again. So, Do I need to create a list for it?

  • This script checks only for the one previous date. What if I have to check for the 2 previous days? Thanks for your help. hope you understand my doubts.

Updated: This perl script run automatically when It checks the curent date with the folder name. The folder is a tar folder which is loaded from other server.

So, basically I need to run the script if it matched with the folder name and current date.

Problem: Sometimes, I used to get the folder next day and my perl script checks only for the current date. The folder i get has the name which is previous date (not the current date).So, I need to do processing of the folder manually. I need to automate it in my perl script


#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Cwd;
use DateTime;
use File::Copy;

# set to your desired time zone
my $today = DateTime->now( time_zone => "America/New_York" );
my $td = $today->strftime("%y-%m-%d");

# strongly recommended to do date math in the 'floating'/UTC zone
my $yesterday = $today->set_time_zone('floating')->subtract( days => 1);
my $yd = $yesterday->set_time_zone('America/New_York')->strftime("%y-%m-%d");

my $dir = shift or die "Provide path on command line. $!";

if ($dir eq '.') {
    $dir = cwd;
}
elsif ($dir !~ /^\//) {
    $dir = cwd() . "/$dir"; 
}

opendir my $dh, $dir or die $!;
my @dir = sort grep {-d and /$td/ || /$yd/} readdir $dh;
closedir $dh or die $!;
@dir or die "Found no date directories. $!";

my $dday = "$dir/$dir[-1]"; # is today unless today not found, then yesterday
my $fdir = '/some/example/path/';    
my @gzfiles = glob("$dday/*tar.gz");

foreach my $zf (@gzfiles) {  
    next if (($zf =~ /BMP/) || ($zf =~ /LG/) || ($zf =~ /MAP/) || ($zf =~ /STR/)); 
    print "$zf\n";
    copy($zf, $fdir) or die "Unable to copy. $!";
}
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you grab the latest available folder and process it? It seems to be what you are trying if i am not mistaken. You could additionally check if its age is inside a specific range of days. –  matthias krull Jul 19 '11 at 16:47
    
I want to do it automatically. I get the folder in my directory from other site and then I need to process it. But sometimes, a folder reaches late by a day. So, I need to check for the previous date as well. –  user847323 Jul 19 '11 at 16:57
    
Please check the updated part in the question. –  user847323 Jul 19 '11 at 16:59
    
But still you just want to process the latest not processed folder? To keep track of your processed folders between runs of your script you can use a plain text file or Storable search.cpan.org/~ams/Storable-2.30/Storable.pm –  matthias krull Jul 19 '11 at 17:17
    
Yes. I need to process the latest folder. But sometimes, you get 2 folders in 1 day and then you need to process both. So, I need to check for those folders as well by matching the previous date with the folder name. In my script, I only check the today's folder and if it is not present, I check for the previous date. I need to make it compulsary in my script to check both and see if the previous date folder was processed or not. –  user847323 Jul 19 '11 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, another way to do it, as suggested by mugen kenichi, is to use Storable. This way stores a hash with all processed directories in it. Then when you run your program, it can check the hash to see if they have been processed.

You would need a one-time script to set up the hash of processed directories.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Storable;

# This script to be run 1 time only. Sets up 'processed' directories hash.
# After this script is run, ready to run the daily script.

my $dir = '.'; # or what ever directory the date-directories are stored in

opendir my $dh, $dir or die "Opening failed for directory $dir $!";
my @dir = grep {-d && /^\d\d-\d\d-\d\d$/ && $_ le '11-04-21'} readdir $dh;
closedir $dh or die "Unable to close $dir $!";

my %processed = map {$_ => 1} @dir;

store \%processed, 'processed_dirs.dat';

Then, a script to be run periodically to find and process your date directories.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Copy;
use Storable;

my $dir = shift or die "Provide path on command line. $!";

my $processed = retrieve('processed_dirs.dat'); # $processed is a hashref

opendir my $dh, $dir or die "Opening failed for directory $dir $!";
my @dir = grep {-d && /^\d\d-\d\d-\d\d$/ && !$processed->{$_} } readdir $dh;
closedir $dh or die "Unable to close $dir $!";
@dir or die "Found no unprocessed date directories";

my $fdir = '/some/example/path';

for my $date (@dir) {
    my $dday = "$dir/$date";
    my @gzfiles = glob("$dday/*tar.gz");

    foreach my $zf (@gzfiles) {  
        next if $zf =~ /BMP/ || $zf =~ /LG/ || $zf =~ /MAP/ || $zf =~ /STR/; 
        print "$zf\n";
        copy($zf, $fdir) or die "Unable to copy $zf to $fdir. $!";
    }
    $processed->{ $date } = 1;
}

store $processed, 'processed_dirs.dat';
share|improve this answer
    
instead of two scripts, if I hardcode the name of the folders initially in the hashtable and add the processed folder later on , would it work? My preference would be to use only one script...whats your thought about it?Is it feasible? –  user847323 Jul 21 '11 at 0:42
    
But I really appreciate your help and time. You are awesome. –  user847323 Jul 21 '11 at 0:56
    
Yes, it might be preferable to have it in 1 script. I would just have an if statement like: if (! -e 'processed_dirs.dat'), and then do my setup operations for the hash and store it. Then the main program could continue. –  Chris Charley Jul 21 '11 at 16:27
    
Since, I have just started using perl, so I know the basic things. In your code, my @dir = grep {-d && /^\d\d-\d\d-\d\d$/ && !$processed->{$_} } readdir $dh; --> I dont understand the " /^\d\d-\d\d-\d\d$/" and it would be great if you add the following changes you told me as i screwed up the whole script. If you make it one script, it would be great. Thanks for your help and time –  user847323 Jul 21 '11 at 22:11
    
To learn about regular expressions, /^\d\d=\d\d-\d\d$/, see perlrequick and perlretut. Then, if you still have questions, ask them :-) –  Chris Charley Jul 21 '11 at 23:55

If you want to persist the status of whether these directories were processed beyond a single run of your app, you could create a .processed file in each directory and check for the existence of this file before you process the directory.

If you just need to store the status of these directories (processed or unprocessed) during the execution of your script, you could use a hash keyed with the directory name:

my %PROCESSED = ();

if ($processing_done) {
  %PROCESSED{$dirname} = 1;
} else {
  %PROCESSED{$dirname} = 0;
}

You can check to see if each directory has been processed by reading the key value from the hash:

if (%PROCESSED{$dirname} == 0) {
 ... do some processing
} else {
 ... this one is already done
}
share|improve this answer

This solution finds all directories yet to be processed that are newer than the most recent direcory-date processed. You have manually record it the first time, (before the script is run). The script will update it from that point on.

The file could be named like my $last = 'dir_last.dat'; I just entered a file at the command line like:

C:\Old_Data\perlp>echo 11-07-14 > dir_last.bat

C:\Old_Data\perlp>type dir_last.bat
11-07-14

C:\Old_Data\perlp>

This assumes the newest directory was 11-07-14. You must find out this yourself before running the script.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Copy;

my $dir = shift or die "Provide path on command line. $!";

my $last = 'dir_last.dat';

open my $fh, "<", $last or die "Unable to open $last $!";
chomp(my $last_proc = <$fh>);
close $fh or die "Unable to close $last $!";

opendir my $dh, $dir or die "Opening failed for directory $dir $!";
my @dir = sort grep {-d && /^\d\d-\d\d-\d\d$/ && $_ gt $last_proc} readdir $dh;
closedir $dh or die "Unable to close $dir $!";
@dir or die "Found no date directories after last update: $last_proc";

my $fdir = '/some/example/path';

for my $date (@dir) {
    my $dday = "$dir/$date";
    my @gzfiles = glob("$dday/*tar.gz");

    foreach my $zf (@gzfiles) {  
        next if $zf =~ /BMP/ || $zf =~ /LG/ || $zf =~ /MAP/ || $zf =~ /STR/; 
        print "$zf\n";
        copy($zf, $fdir) or die "Unable to copy $zf to $fdir. $!";
    }
}

open  $fh, ">", $last or die "Unable to open $last $!";
print $fh "$dir[-1]\n"; # record the newest date-directory as processed
close $fh or die "Unable to close $last $!";

Notice that I didn't rely on cwd like the first script. It really wasn't needed there and isn't needed here. opendir, glob and copy all can handle the dot (cwd) directory and relative paths.

The header includes the lines use strict; and use warnings;. Their purpose is to alert you of errors in your code (most all perl scripts should use them unless an expert decides to exclude them - for what reason I don't know). The first line tells unix where to find the interpreter (perl).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I have some doubts. I know my latest processed folder as I can see it in the list of processed folders. But How do I put it manually? Like 11-04-21 is the latest folder, so in the script, where should I use it in place of what? In your case, 11-07-14 is the latest processed folder, so where did you use it in the script? –  user847323 Jul 20 '11 at 15:43
    
Above where I create the dir_last.dat file with: echo 11-07-14 > dir_last.bat', just change that to: echo 11-04-21 > dir_last.bat` This command is entered at your command line. You only have to create the file once this way. The script will keep it up to date in the code afterwards. –  Chris Charley Jul 20 '11 at 19:55
    
amazing stuff...but I guess, it still has some problem. Suppose, you get 2 folders on the same date. One folder is supposed to come a day before and the 2nd folder is supposed to come on the same date. So, If it processes the 2nd folder first, the dir_last.dat will be updated with the new date. And the first folder will never get processed as its date is less than the newer one. –  user847323 Jul 20 '11 at 21:16
    
Basically, I get folders that are supposed to come a bit early but they dont arrive on their assigned time. They arrive on the next date (current date) with the other folder. So, I need to check all the folders i. e current date and previous date folders(if they are not processed). –  user847323 Jul 20 '11 at 21:20

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