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I'm using Ubuntu Linux 11.04. Periodically, I need to clean up orphaned Flash processes that resemble

F S UID        PID  PPID  C PRI  NI ADDR SZ WCHAN  STIME TTY          TIME CMD
0 R selenium 25949     1 54  80   0 - 19187 -      00:09 ?        05:26:03 /usr/lib/nspluginwrapper/i386/linux/npviewer.bin --plugin /usr/lib/flashplug

I know these are orphaned because the parent pid (PPID) will always be 1. Similarly I know the process is always an "npviewer.bin" process. I just don't know the magic one liner to identify all these processes and kill them.

Thanks for your help, - Dave

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks for the responses. The answer turns out to be

pgrep -P1 -f 'npviewer\.bin' | xargs kill -9
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Try killall npviewer.bin or killall -9 npviewer.bin if you're feeling mean.

If you want to discriminate, you'll have to write a script that looks for this info in /proc, or maybe ps aux | grep npviewer | myscript to string-hack the neccesary info.

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Your command would kill all running Flash instances, and I only want to kill the orphaned ones. How do I do that? –  Dave Jul 19 '11 at 17:01
    
The second example myscript can grep, cut, etc the input to extract the PPID. It won't be portable, but it can work for you. –  spraff Jul 19 '11 at 17:02

Use ps -e -o "%P;%p;%c" to locate the process. The output will be three columns, separated by ;

The first column must be 1 (PPID) and the last column contains the process name (without arguments). Some versions of ps add the path, some omit it. Trim the line (some versions of ps pad the output) and look for the regexp npviewer.bin$

If a line matches, kill the process with the PID in column 2.

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+1 for mentioning ps placeholders –  xaccrocheur Jul 7 '12 at 10:36

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