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I was trying to determine a good way to calculate a previous date based on how many weeks I would want to go back. Today is 7/19/2011, so if I wanted to go back 5 weeks what would be the best way to determine what that date would be?

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For linky goodness: stackoverflow.com/questions/2311385/… –  Alex Jul 20 '11 at 4:05
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8 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

DateTime::Duration is your friend there:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use DateTime;

my $now = DateTime->now(time_zone => 'local');
my $five_weeks = DateTime::Duration->new(weeks => 5);
my $five_weeks_ago = $now - $five_weeks;

say "Five weeks ago now it was $five_weeks_ago";

Notice that it lets you specify the duration in the units of the problem.

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->now is in GMT which may or may not be what you want. –  Chas. Owens Jul 20 '11 at 9:28
    
However, ->from_epoch is exactly what I don't want. –  darch Jul 20 '11 at 18:35
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Perl has this marvelous thing called regexes that can solve almost any problem.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $date = shift || '7/19/2011';
my $days_ago = shift || 7*5;

$date =~ s#^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)\z#@{[sprintf"%.2d",$1]}/@{[sprintf"%.2d",$2]}/$3/$days_ago#;
until ( $date =~ s#^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/0\z#@{[$1+0]}/@{[$2+0]}/$3# ) {
    $date =~ s#([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)#@{[$2==1?sprintf"%.2d",$1-1||12:$1]}/@{[sprintf"%.2d",$2-1||31]}/@{[$1==1 && $2==1?$3-1:$3]}/@{[$4-1]}#;
    $date =~ s#([0-9]+)\z#@{[$1+1]}# unless $date =~ m#^(?:0[1-9]|1[012])/(?:0[1-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-8]|(?<!0[2469]/|11/)31|(?<!02/)30|(?<!02/(?=...(?:..(?:[02468][1235679]|[13579][01345789])|(?:[02468][1235679]|[13579][01345789])00)))29)/#;
}
print $date, "\n";

(Please don't do it this way.)

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I dunno, 5 regexes and a loop, might be slow... Better to combine that into a single regex with embedded code blocks, while coding the loop into the backtracking :) –  Eric Strom Jul 19 '11 at 21:34
    
The last two regexes could be combined into a single substitution, but I was too lazy. –  ysth Jul 19 '11 at 21:47
    
I wish it to be noted that my upvote in no way should be construed as condoning this solution. –  Chas. Owens Jul 20 '11 at 13:08
    
a downvote! yay –  ysth Jul 22 '11 at 1:35
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I like Date::Calc

use strict;
use warnings;
use Date::Calc qw/Add_Delta_Days Today/;

my $offset_weeks = -5;
my $offset_days = $offset_weeks * 7;

# Year, Month, Day
my @delta_date = Add_Delta_Days( 
    Today( [ localtime ] ), 
    $offset_days 
);

printf "%2d/%2d/%4d\n", @delta_date[1,2,0];

It is designed to catch common gotchas such as leap year.

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Best or easiest? I have always found strftime's date normalization to be handy for this sort of thing:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use POSIX qw/strftime/;

my @date = localtime;

print strftime "today is %Y-%m-%d\n", @date;

$date[3] -= 5 * 7;

print strftime "five weeks ago was %Y-%m-%d\n", @date;

Which solution is best depends partly on what you want to do with the date when you are done. Here is a benchmark with implementations of various methods:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark;

use Date::Manip qw/UnixDate/;
use Date::Simple qw/today/;
use Date::Calc qw/Add_Delta_Days Today/;
use DateTime;
use POSIX qw/strftime/;
use Class::Date;

my %subs = (
    cd => sub {
        (Class::Date::now - [0, 0, 5 * 7])->strftime("%Y-%m-%d");
    },
    dc => sub {
        sprintf "%d-%02s-%02d", Add_Delta_Days Today, -5 * 7;
    },
    dm => sub {
        UnixDate("5 weeks ago", "%Y-%m-%d");
    },
    ds => sub {
        (today() - 5 * 7)->strftime("%Y-%m-%d");
    },
    dt => sub {
        my $now = DateTime->from_epoch(epoch => time, time_zone => "local");
        my $five_weeks = DateTime::Duration->new(weeks => 5);
        ($now - $five_weeks)->ymd('-');
    },
    p => sub {
        my @date = localtime;
        $date[3] -= 5 * 7;
        strftime "%Y-%m-%d", @date;
    },
    y => sub {
        my ($d, $m, $y) = (localtime)[3..5];
        my $date = join "/", $m+1, $d, $y+1900;
        my $days_ago = 7*5;

        $date =~ s#^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)\z#@{[sprintf"%.2d",$1]}/@{[sprintf"%.2d",$2]}/$3/$days_ago#;
        until ( $date =~ s#^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/0\z#@{[$1+0]}/@{[$2+0]}/$3# ) {
            $date =~ s#([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)#@{[$2==1?sprintf"%.2d",$1-1||12:$1]}/@{[sprintf"%.2d",$2-1||31]}/@{[$1==1 && $2==1?$3-1:$3]}/@{[$4-1]}#;
            $date =~ s#([0-9]+)\z#@{[$1+1]}# unless $date =~ m#^(?:0[1-9]|1[012])/(?:0[1-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-8]|(?<!0[2469]/|11/)31|(?<!02/)30|(?<!02/(?=...(?:..(?:[02468][1235679]|[13579][01345789])|(?:[02468][1235679]|[13579][01345789])00)))29)/#;
        }
        return $date;
    },
);

print "$_: ", $subs{$_}(), "\n" for keys %subs;

Benchmark::cmpthese -1, \%subs;

And here are the results. The strftime method seems to be the fastest, but it is also has the least features.

y: 6/14/2011
dm: 2011-06-14
p: 2011-06-14
dc: 2011-06-14
cd: 2011-06-14
dt: 2011-06-15
ds: 2011-06-14
      Rate    dt    dm     y    ds    cd    dc     p
dt  1345/s    --   -5%  -28%  -77%  -82%  -96%  -98%
dm  1408/s    5%    --  -24%  -75%  -81%  -96%  -98%
y   1862/s   38%   32%    --  -68%  -75%  -95%  -97%
ds  5743/s  327%  308%  208%    --  -24%  -84%  -90%
cd  7529/s  460%  435%  304%   31%    --  -78%  -87%
dc 34909/s 2495% 2378% 1775%  508%  364%    --  -39%
p  56775/s 4121% 3931% 2949%  889%  654%   63%    --

Better than a benchmark is a test of how they handle DST (this test would have caught the error in the assumption about what DateTime->now returns).

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Mock;
use Date::Manip qw/UnixDate/;
use Date::Simple qw/today/;
use Date::Calc qw/Add_Delta_Days Today/;
use DateTime;
use POSIX qw/strftime mktime/;
use Class::Date;

sub target {
        my @date = localtime;
        $date[3] -= 5 * 7;
        strftime "%Y-%m-%d", @date;
}

my %subs = (
    cd => sub {
        (Class::Date::now - [0, 0, 5 * 7])->strftime("%Y-%m-%d");
    },
    dc => sub { sprintf "%d-%02s-%02d", Add_Delta_Days Today, -5 * 7;
    },
    dm => sub {
        UnixDate("5 weeks ago", "%Y-%m-%d");
    },
    ds => sub {
        (today() - 5 * 7)->strftime("%Y-%m-%d");
    },
    dt => sub {
        my $now = DateTime->from_epoch( epoch => time, time_zone => 'local' );
        my $five_weeks = DateTime::Duration->new(weeks => 5);
        ($now - $five_weeks)->ymd('-');
    },
    y => sub {
        my ($d, $m, $y) = (localtime)[3..5];
        my $date = join "/", $m+1, $d, $y+1900;
        my $days_ago = 7*5;

        $date =~ s#^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)\z#@{[sprintf"%.2d",$1]}/@{[sprintf"%.2d",$2]}/$3/$days_ago#;
        until ( $date =~ s#^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/0\z#@{[$1+0]}/@{[$2+0]}/$3# ) {
            $date =~ s#([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)#@{[$2==1?sprintf"%.2d",$1-1||12:$1]}/@{[sprintf"%.2d",$2-1||31]}/@{[$1==1 && $2==1?$3-1:$3]}/@{[$4-1]}#;
            $date =~ s#([0-9]+)\z#@{[$1+1]}# unless $date =~ m#^(?:0[1-9]|1[012])/(?:0[1-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-8]|(?<!0[2469]/|11/)31|(?<!02/)30|(?<!02/(?=...(?:..(?:[02468][1235679]|[13579][01345789])|(?:[02468][1235679]|[13579][01345789])00)))29)/#;
        }
        return join "-", map { sprintf "%02d", $_ } 
            (split "/", $date)[2,0,1];
    },
);

my $time = mktime 0, 0, 0, 13, 2, 111; #2011-03-13 00:00:00, DST in US

for my $offset (map { $_ * 60 * 60 } 1 .. 24) {
    print strftime "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S\n", (localtime $time + $offset);
    Time::Mock->set($time + $offset);
    my $target = target;

    for my $sub (sort keys %subs) {
        my $result = $subs{$sub}();
        if ($result ne $target) {
            print "$sub disagrees: ",
                "time $time target $target result $result\n";
        }
    }
}
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can you add my answer to your benchmark? :) –  ysth Jul 19 '11 at 20:47
    
Lol... we're going to compare date calculations based on benchmark results? :) We could cache the results too. That way the calculation won't have to be done more than once a day unless the number of weeks back changes. (It's ok, I found it interesting.) It's surprising to see how well dc did. –  DavidO Jul 19 '11 at 21:34
    
DC has never been a slouch. To be fair, it should also say "the dt method seems to be the slowest, but it also had the most features". (DT isn't inherently slow; a lot of what kills it, at least in cases I've looked closely at, is Params::Validate, something none of the others do.) –  ysth Jul 19 '11 at 22:11
    
@ysth Of course! I just grabbed a bunch from CPAN. –  Chas. Owens Jul 20 '11 at 0:06
1  
Why does the DateTime version have a different answer? –  Justin Hawkins Jul 20 '11 at 5:11
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Using Time::Piece:

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds qw(ONE_DAY);

my $weeks_back = 5;
my $date_str = '7/19/2011';
my $dt = Time::Piece->strptime($date_str, '%m/%d/%Y');

# Avoid DST issues
$dt -= ONE_DAY() * ( 7 * $weeks_back - 0.5 )
my $past_str = $dt->strftime('%m/%d/%Y');
print "$past_str\n";
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Too much code for such a simple question! All you need is two simple lines:

my $five_weeks_ago = time - (5*7)*24*60*60;
print scalar localtime($five_weeks_ago), "\n";

My solution is accurate for both DST and leap years.

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say POSIX::strftime( 
      '%m/%d/%Y'     # format string -> mm/dd/YYYY
    , 0              # no seconds
    , 0              # no minutes
    , 0              # no hours
    , 19 - ( 5 * 7 ) # current day - numweeks * 7
    , 7 - 1          # month - 1
    , 2011 - 1900    # YYYY year - 1900
    );

Yes, the day comes out to be 19 - 35 = -16, and yes it works.

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strftime normalizes for you (that is why it is slower than sprintf at formatting the date), so you can just subtract 5 * 7 days from the day field and it will do the right thing. –  Chas. Owens Jul 20 '11 at 0:10
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If date is available as unix timestamp, it can be done with simple arithmetic:

use POSIX qw/strftime/;
say strftime('%Y-%m-%d', localtime(time - 5 * 7 * 86400));
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This will fail on DTS switch days, because there is less (or more) then 86400 seconds in a day. –  Ivan Nevostruev Jul 19 '11 at 19:47
    
easily fixed by using gmtime, not localtime –  ysth Jul 19 '11 at 20:02
    
@ysth More easily fixed by letting strftime normalize the date for you. –  Chas. Owens Jul 20 '11 at 0:11
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