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I have a table that has IDs and Strings and I need to be able to properly index for searching for the end of the strings. How we are currently handling it is copying the information into another table and reversing each string and indexing it normally. What I would like to do is use some kind of index that allows to search in reverse.

Example

Data: 
F7421kFSD1234 
d7421kFSD1235 
F7541kFSD1236 
d7421kFSD1234
F7421kFSD1235 
b8765kFSD1235 
d7421kFSD1234

The way our users usually input thier search is something along the lines of...

*1234

By reversing the strings (and the search string: 4321*) I could find what I am looking for without completely scanning the whole table. My question is: Is making a second table the best way of doing this?

Is there a way to reverse index? Ive tried an index like this...

create index REVERSE_STR_IDX on TABLE(STRING) REVERSE;

but oracle doesn't seem to be using it according to the Explain Plan.

Thanks in advance for the help.


Update:

I did have a problem with unicode characters not being reversed correctly. The solution to this was casting them.

Example:

select REVERSE(cast(string AS varchar2(2000)))
from tbl 
where id = 1
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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is the myth that a reverse key index can be used for that, however, I've never seen that in action.

I would try a "manual" function based index.

CREATE INDEX REVERSE_STR_IDX on TBL(reverse(string));

SELECT *
  FROM TBL
 WHERE reverse(string) LIKE '4321%';
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Agree. Reverse key indexes are designed for a specific use case - eliminating block contention around sequential index values (the right-legged index). The optimizer refuses to consider using a range scan against a reverse key index. –  Adam Musch Jul 19 '11 at 18:14
1  
As an aside, REVERSE is byte-based. If you are using multibyte characters, you may not get the results you expect. –  Gary Myers Jul 19 '11 at 23:44
1  
To fix the problem with multibyte characters, you should apply the reverse function to both sides of the comparison, i.e. LIKE reverse('%1234') - although I'm not sure how well the % in a byte-reversed string will work - i.e. if the byte immediately following the % happens to start a multi-byte character when the string is reversed, the LIKE might not work as expected. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jul 20 '11 at 9:55
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