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I have a .plist file containing a dictionary item, something like this:

<dict>
          <dict>
                     <key>Key one</key>
                     <string>string</string>
                     ...
          </dict>
          ...
</dict>

How can I edit the string of Key one? I'm stuck here:

NSString *pathVibrate = [NSString stringWithString:@"plist path"
NSMutableDictionary *plistDict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:pathVibrate];

EDIT. The plist is like this :S

<dict>
          <key>Key One</key>
          <dict>
                     <key>Key one</key>
                     <string>string</string>
                     ...
          </dict>
          <key>Key Two</key>
          <dict>
                     <key>Key one</key>
                     <string>string</string>
                     ...
          </dict>
</dict>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Saving a plist is easy, simply use

// for an array
BOOL result = [myArray writeToFile:filename atomically:YES];

// for a dictionary
BOOL result = [myDict writeToFile:filename atomically:YES];

// spot a pattern? :O)

The atomically basically tells it not to overwrite any previous file until this file has been succesfully written - that way if the app crashes, or there is a problem with the write the old file that was there previously will still exist.

If you aren't familiar with the NSDictionary and NSArray classes it's worth reading through the documentation on them. I can also recommend a good book called iPhone 3 Development by Apress which is a good beginners introduction (it's what I started with a few years ago and I'm sure there be a 4.x update by now).

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Not 100% sure I know what you after, do you mean you want to edit the key string, or the string stored in that ket, I suspect the latter...

NSString *origString = [plistDict objectForKey:@"Key one"];
NSString *newString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Some change here to string =     %@",origString];
[plistDict setObject:newString forKey:@"Key one"]; // Will overwrite the original dictionary entry with the new string

OK so based on the extra information I presume you want to change a dictionary within a dictionary, in which case the code above needs a small change...

NSMutableDictionary *subDictionary = [plistDict objectForKey:@"Key One"];
NSString *origString = [subDictionary objectForKey:@"Key one"];
NSString *newString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Some change here to string =     %@",origString];
[subDictionary setObject:newString forKey:@"Key one"]; // Will overwrite the original dictionary entry with the new string


subDictionary = [plistDict objectForKey:@"Key Two"];
NSString *origString = [subDictionary objectForKey:@"Key one"];
NSString *newString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Some other change here to string =     %@",origString];
[subDictionary setObject:newString forKey:@"Key one"]; // Will overwrite the original dictionary entry with the new string

Is that what you are after? In which case I'm not 100% sure, but I don't think the plistDict needs to be declared as Mutable as the root dictionary itself doesn't change, only the sub dictionary.

You should of course validate the pointer returned from the [plistDict objectForKey:xxx] is not nil to ensure the key actually exists before going on to modify the results...

NSMutableDictionary *subDictionary = [plistDict objectForKey:@"Key One"];
if(subDictionary!=nil)
{
    NSString *origString = [subDictionary objectForKey:@"Key one"];
    if(origString!=nil)
    {
        NSString *newString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Some other change here to string =     %@",origString];
        [subDictionary setObject:newString forKey:@"Key one"]; // Will overwrite the original dictionary entry with the new string
    }
}

Note I once read in an Objective C book that in objective C it's not sufficient to simply test a pointer:

if(subDictionary) { }

as in a boolean test objective C only tests the bottom 8 bits for a none zero value and ignores the rest of the bits in a pointer, therefore if the pointer lies on a 256 byte boundary the if would return false when it is in fact true. This may have been addressed in Objective-C 2.0, however I always do the long hand version for safety.

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I forget to specify one thing, the plist is like this (Sorry): pastie.org/2238454 –  Nicolò Ciraci Jul 19 '11 at 18:00
    
OK, still not quite sure what you are asking. I now know you have a plist, containing a dictionary which contains two further dictionaries, each with a string / key in them, both of which you want to edit, is that correct? –  Richard Baxter Jul 19 '11 at 18:55
    
And then to save the plist? –  Nicolò Ciraci Jul 19 '11 at 21:49

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