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So, let's say I have an interface IThingFactory:

public interface IThingFactory
{
    Thing GetThing(int thingId);
}

Now, let's say I have a concrete implementation that retrieves Things from a database. Now, let's also say I have a concrete implementation that wraps an existing IThingFactory and checks for a Thing's presence in, say, an in-memory cache before hitting the wrapped IThingFactory. Something like:

public class CachedThingFactory : IThingFactory
{
    private IThingFactory _wrapped;
    private Dictionary<int, Thing> _cachedThings;

    public CachedThingFactory(IThingFactory wrapped)
    {
        this._wrapped = wrapped;
        _cachedThings = new Dictionary<int,Thing>();
    }

    public Thing GetThing(int thingId)
    {
        Thing x;
        if(_cachedThings.TryGetValue(thingId, out x))
            return x;

        x = _wrapped.GetThing(thingId);

        _cachedThings[thingId] = x;

        return x;
    }
}

How would I deal with a scenario like this using dependency injection with something like, say, Ninject, so that I could configure the DI container so that I can inject or remove a caching proxy like this, or, say, something that does logging, or (insert here)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do something along the lines of:

Bind<IThingFactory> ().To<DefaultThingFactory> ().WhenInjectedInto<CachedThingFactory> ();
Bind<IThingFactory> ().To<CachedThingFactory> ();

This will let consumers not need to specify a name attribute, and is still relatively easy to further enhance. If you later wanted to add an additional "decorator" layer for logging, you could do:

Bind<IThingFactory> ().To<DefaultThingFactory> ().WhenInjectedInto<LoggingThingFactory> ();
Bind<IThingFactory> ().To<LoggingThingFactory> ().WhenInjectedInto<CachedThingFactory> ();
Bind<IThingFactory> ().To<CachedThingFactory> ();

Not the prettiest, but it works.

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Didn't even know that a WhenInjectedInto() method existed. Thanks! –  FMM Jul 19 '11 at 20:23

One of the benefits of DI framework is that you don't have to do things like these. Ninject has various scopes that you can use to specify the lifetime of your objects. It'll handle caching and stuff for you.

Read more here: http://kohari.org/2009/03/06/cache-and-collect-lifecycle-management-in-ninject-20/

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Not exactly what I'm asking. I'm familiar with Ninject's object scopes, and I'm leveraging request scope and singleton scope heavily in my MVC-based app. Your suggestion solves my contrived example, but misses the point of the question. How do I configure a binding so that I can "wrap" an interface, like above? –  FMM Jul 19 '11 at 19:26
    
Something like this: BindToFactory<IThing, CachedThingFactory>().InRequestScope(); –  Mrchief Jul 19 '11 at 19:38
    
Forgot to mention, if you use BindToFactory(), you need to wire up your own provider - tweak your CachedThingFactory to implement IProvider (more in here github.com/ninject/ninject/wiki/…). You can also use .ToMethod() approach. –  Mrchief Jul 19 '11 at 20:07

I suppose you are searching for named binding, documented here:

https://github.com/ninject/ninject/wiki/Contextual-Binding

Bind<IThingFactory>().To<CachedThingFactory>().Named("TheCachedThing");
Bind<IThingFactory>().To<DefaultThingFactory >().Named("ThePureThing");

and then

public CachedThingFactory([Named("ThePureThing")] IThingFactory wrapped)
{
    this._wrapped = wrapped;
    _cachedThings = new Dictionary<int,Thing>();
}

and for the consumer of the CachedThingFactory

public ThingFactoryConsumer([Named("TheCachedThing")] IThingFactory thingFactory)
{
   _thingFactory = thingFactory;
}
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I was already familiar with named bindings; however, it feels dirty to decorate my classes with stringly-typed attributes. –  FMM Jul 21 '11 at 3:18
    
Was not quite clear form your question :-). Worth reading: eeichinger.blogspot.com/2009/12/… from a "decorator" to "aop". –  Andreas Jul 21 '11 at 8:47
    
Interesting read, thanks! The IMethodInterceptor interface that he specs out in the next blog feels even dirtier, though =) –  FMM Jul 21 '11 at 16:14

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