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In C# is there any cost of storing ints (or any value types) as objects and casting them back to int(or the value type)?

Basically I need to create an in-memory table. I can create "columns" specific for each possible type (so any primitive value type such as int, double, string etc and also user defined reference types i want store in the table such as Order) or I could simply store EVERYTHING as an object and cast them back to the correct type when accessing the table.

So my question is which approach will perform better or will both be the same?

Or should i stick with specific "columns" for all value types and store all user defined reference types as object?

Thanks - Example code below - Static Test method shows usage.

public sealed class Columns
{
    public static void Test()
    {
        Columns cols = new Columns(100);
        cols.SetInt(0,Int_Column,12345);
        int value = cols.GetInt(0,Int_Column);

        cols.SetObject(1,Object_Column,12345);
        int value2 = (int)cols.GetObject(1,Object_Column);
    }

    private const int Int_Column = 0;
    private const int String_Column = 1;
    private const int Object_Column = 2;

    private int[] _intCol;
    private string[] _stringCol;
    private object[] _objCol;

    public Columns(int rowCount)
    {
        _intCol = new int[rowCount];
        _stringCol = new string[rowCount];
        _objCol = new object[rowCount];
    }

    public void SetInt(int rowIndex, int colIndex, int value)
    {
        switch(colIndex)
        {
            case Int_Column:
                _intCol[rowIndex] = value;
                break;
            default:
                throw new Exception("Incorrect column index specified.");
        }
    }

    public int GetInt(int rowIndex, int colIndex)
    {
        switch(colIndex)
        {
            case Int_Column:
                return _intCol[rowIndex];
            default:
                throw new Exception("Incorrect column index specified.");
        }
    }

    public void SetString(int rowIndex, int colIndex, string value)
    {
        switch(colIndex)
        {
            case String_Column:
                _stringCol[rowIndex] = value;
                break;
            default:
                throw new Exception("Incorrect column index specified.");
        }
    }

    public string GetString(int rowIndex, int colIndex)
    {
        switch(colIndex)
        {
            case String_Column:
                return _stringCol[rowIndex];
            default:
                throw new Exception("Incorrect column index specified.");
        }
    }

    public void SetObject(int rowIndex, int colIndex, object value)
    {
        switch(colIndex)
        {
            case Object_Column:
                _objCol[rowIndex] = value;
                break;
            default:
                throw new Exception("Incorrect column index specified.");
        }
    }

    public object GetObject(int rowIndex, int colIndex)
    {
        switch(colIndex)
        {
            case Object_Column:
                return _objCol[rowIndex];
            default:
                throw new Exception("Incorrect column index specified.");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Yes there is a cost, casting to object causes one memory allocation. Search for boxing and unboxing. (btw string is no value type, and thus doesn't get boxed when casting to object) –  CodesInChaos Jul 19 '11 at 19:31
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is called boxing and the cost is actually huge, both in performance and in memory use. If you want to avoid boxing and you want to cause a few simple types like int and double to share memory, use the LayoutKind struct layout attribute to force them to share memory, then set your list to be of that struct type. For example:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
[CLSCompliant(false)]
public struct NumberStackEntry
{
    /// <summary>Type of entry</summary>
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public EntryTypes entryType;

    /// <summary>Value if double</summary>
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    public double dval;

    /// <summary>Value if ulong</summary>
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    public ulong uval;

    /// <summary>Value if long</summary>
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    public long lval;

    /// <summary>Value if integer</summary>
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    public int ival;
}

Edit: You can make an array of the above, without boxing to fill members of the array with these values. You cannot add an array to the struct, though, and make it share memory with non-CLI reference types.

share|improve this answer
    
:So if i store values type e.g. ints in int arrays they won't be boxed right? –  JamesRedcoat Jul 19 '11 at 19:37
    
Arrays themselves are a CLI reference type, not a value type, so you can't use them with FieldOffset like above. However, you could do an array of NumberStackEntry defined above, without boxing any member of the array, yes. –  Ed Bayiates Jul 19 '11 at 19:39
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There is a cost. When storing an int as an object it need to be boxed. A value type is stored directly, while a reference type (which an object is) is stored in an own piece of memory which is allocated for it (and later freed by the garbage collector). When assigning a value type to an object it is boxed into an object, allocated on the managed heap. When casting back it is unboxed.

Depending on your needs, the cost for boxing can be relevant or not. Unless you are doing scientific calculations with huge data volumes, games with lots of objects and high frame rate requirements etc. I think the cost won't be relevant. In that case it is better to strive for readable code that is easy to maintain and optimize only if you notice a performance problem.

share|improve this answer
    
So if i store values type e.g. ints in int arrays they won't be boxed right? –  JamesRedcoat Jul 19 '11 at 19:36
    
No, in that case they won't be boxed. –  Anders Abel Jul 19 '11 at 19:39
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So I really like AresAvatar's answer, except for the use of LayoutExplicit.

Word of warning, overlapping fields in structures is intended to be used for marshaling unmanaged APIs. Even there it does not work well, but some uses on some platforms will corrupt the CLR runtime.

Taking his example you could instead use something like this:

public struct RecordValue
{
    private object _ref;
    private long _val;

    public string String
    {
        get { return _ref as string; }
        set { _ref = value; }
    }

    public double Double 
    { 
        get { return BitConverter.Int64BitsToDouble(_val); }
        set { _val = BitConverter.DoubleToInt64Bits(value); }
    }

    public long Int64
    {
        get { return _val; }
        set { _val = value; }
    }

    public ulong UInt64
    {
        get { return unchecked((ulong)_val); }
        set { _val = unchecked((long)value); }
    }
    public int Int32
    {
        get { return unchecked((int)_val); }
        set { _val = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've never had any problems using it, and I use it for other things than marshalling APIs. Where do you find evidence it corrupts the CLR runtime? –  Ed Bayiates Jul 19 '11 at 19:54
    
Overlapping integers, longs, and a byte[]. Worked fine in debug builds, and release builds running in x86; however, in 64-bit it blows up. Another issue with this this is overlapping a bool type, you can get a boolean value where (b != true && b != false) will result as a true expression. –  csharptest.net Jul 19 '11 at 20:15
    
The compiler won't let you overlap CLR types like byte[] or string with other types. I did say to only use it for simple types. I've not seen the problem you are seeing with bools on 32 or 64 bits. –  Ed Bayiates Jul 19 '11 at 20:19
    
@AresAvatar, Just a few topics on this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1455034 stackoverflow.com/questions/1703759 –  csharptest.net Jul 19 '11 at 20:50
1  
@AresAvatar, You said it best -- "you can apparently get yourself in trouble if you moved beyond simple types" I must admit I have not had any issues with Int16, Int32, Int64, or Double so perhaps your example works fine. I've just simply grown to dislike using overlapped structures due to the various 'quirks' encountered. Anyway Ares, I still like your answer of using a struct regardless of exactly how. –  csharptest.net Jul 19 '11 at 21:06
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