Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a script right now in Bash that will execute two SQL queries and analyze that queried data. One of the command line inputs takes in an environment variable, which can be one of three values. If it's not one of those values, the script displays a message that prompts the user to enter in a correct value. However, the script doesn't properly check the value, instead prompting the user. Here is my code:

if [[ -z $ENV1 || $ENV1 != "ITF" || $ENV1 != "Prod" || $ENV1 != "QA" ]]
then
    read -rp "Please enter the first environment (ITF, Prod, QA): " ENV1
fi
echo $ENV1

I think it's a problem with having multiple ||'s in the if line. How can I go about checking for all for of those conditions?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks to be a problem with your condition. Even if ENV1 is any of your options, one of the conditions will be true. For example, ENV1 could be "QA", but ENV1 != "Prod" will still evaluate to true (0). Instead of || use &&:

if [[ -z $ENV1 || ($ENV1 != "ITF" && $ENV1 != "Prod" && $ENV1 != "QA") ]]
then
    read -rp "Please enter the first environment (ITF, Prod, QA): " ENV1
fi
echo $ENV1
share|improve this answer
    
That'd do it! Thank you! –  Zach Dziura Jul 19 '11 at 20:27
    
or he could simply useif [[ -z $ENV1 || !($ENV1 == "ITF" || $ENV1 == "Prod" || $ENV1 == "QA") ]] which makes the code much much more readable –  myAces Jul 19 '11 at 20:32
1  
Or even better, because he's using double-brackets, you don't have to check for zero-length: if [[ !($ENV1 == "ITF" || $ENV1 == "Prod" || $ENV1 == "QA") ]]. –  Manny D Jul 19 '11 at 20:39
    
You'd probably want to use while [[...]]; do ...; done instead of if [[...]]; then ...; fi because you will want to check the user's input until he gets it right. –  glenn jackman Jul 20 '11 at 17:14
    
That would depend on design, but yeah, you could do this too. –  Manny D Jul 20 '11 at 17:19
add comment

Consider using case instead, it will make the code clearer:

case $ENV1 in
    "ITF" | "Prod" | "QA")
        echo using $ENV1
        ;;
    "")
        read -rp "Please enter the first environment (ITF, Prod, QA): " ENV1
        ;;
    *)
        echo $ENV1 is not valid
        read -rp "Please enter the first environment (ITF, Prod, QA): " ENV1
        ;;
 esac
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is a good time to use select:

select ENV1 in ITF Prod QA; do 
  case "$ENV1" in 
    ITF|Prod|QA) break;; 
  esac
done

Not so DRY though.


DRYer version

envs=( ITF Prod QA )
select ENV1 in "${envs[@]}"; do 
  for e in "${envs[@]}"; do 
    [[ $ENV1 == $e ]] && break 2
  done
done
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.