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So, I have this class. It should be a singleton, but there's no reason you couldn't make more.

In it, there are two threads. One is for io_service->run() to wait for incoming UDP packets. The other is for sending out broadcasts.

I followed the example here: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/doc/html/boost_asio/example/echo/async_udp_echo_server.cpp

It works great. The only problem is that I don't want to have to provide the io_service externally, and instead have it hidden away inside of the class.

I haven't read through all the io_service documentation yet, but is it possible to have some private version of io_service within an object instance? Socket's constructor makes life incredibly difficult for getting that done.

How would you change the example to hide things inside the thread?

I'm also a huge C++ noob :P

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It's not clear what the issue is. You want to "hide away the io_service inside the class", then do it. There is nothing stopping you, you simply have to pass the io_service to the constructor of the socket objects you create. Perhaps if you posted some code, we could point you in the right direction. –  Chad Jul 19 '11 at 20:22
    
you really need to post some code, hiding the io_service does not make much sense. There's nothing tricky about using an io_service object, I suspect you are hung up around the Singleton anti-pattern. –  Sam Miller Jul 19 '11 at 20:45
    
That's fair. I guess for sake of argument and me not posting production code, how would you change the example I posted in the link to have the io_service completely encapsulated within the class? It's likely extremely easy, but because socket() must be called when the class is instantiated, AND socket needs an io_service object before the class constructor is done, it seems somewhat impossible. Unless something like server(args) : ioServiceInstance(), socketInstance(ioServiceInstance, udp::endpoint(args)) actually works. Might be because I'm new to C++'s symantics. –  RandomInsano Jul 20 '11 at 20:17
    
Well, just passing the private io_service to socket results in a mutex lock exception (caused by an access violation, maybe because io_service isn't created yet). my_class::my_class() : m_socket(m_ioService, udp::endpoint(udp::v4(), 9999)){ –  RandomInsano Jul 20 '11 at 20:53
    
Turns out the tricky thing about the io_service is that it needs to occur before a socket in the internal variable definitions. It had nothing to do with hiding, and everything to do with what order the constructors were called. –  RandomInsano Oct 21 '11 at 19:20
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2 Answers

You can have io_service hidden but that won't make much sense. If you decide to go with asynchronous model then you have to go for it all the way. Thus, your application should be built around io_services. That said, if you hide io_service inside a class wrapping your socket then who is going to call run () on io_service? To complicate it even more, you will need to throw an extra thread per socket class etc. One possible solution that might actually work for that sort of design is to have some hidden singleton io_service that every socket class in your library will access, but then you limit user from scaling this across multiple threads. As for the constructor and a hard time getting the order right, take a look at base from this idiom, it was designed to solve this kind of problems.

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This is an addon library that controls some networking service somewhere else. I'm just doing async for the hell of it (calling io_service->stop() is a nice convenience), but might change things to blocking since really there's no difference in my application. Run is called by the users of the library and they hook into a callback for when a response is sent (the async code triggers the callback). Maybe a bad design, I'm not sure. –  RandomInsano Jul 20 '11 at 20:30
    
@RandomInsano: Then it is really hard to tell what is the problem. Just hide it and that's it. –  user405725 Jul 20 '11 at 20:34
    
Sorry, should have been specific. Run is called indirectly within a thread inside of the class. That thread just handles the async recieve. Sending is non-async and is handled in a second thread. –  RandomInsano Jul 20 '11 at 20:36
    
It's the process of hiding it that I'm having trouble with. Might be because I'm not used to C++ yet. –  RandomInsano Jul 20 '11 at 20:37
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Okay! Someone I work with inherited this horrible library and figured out my problem...

Hiding io_service within the class is absolutely possible BUT! You must have the io_service object defined before the socket object. It doesn't matter what order you specify the sub-constructors at all.

Example:

  Works:
  boost::asio::io_service io_service;
  udp::socket socket_;
  udp::endpoint sender_endpoint_;
  enum { max_length = 1024 };
  char data_[max_length];

  doesn't work:
  udp::socket socket_;
  boost::asio::io_service io_service;
  udp::endpoint sender_endpoint_;
  enum { max_length = 1024 };
  char data_[max_length];

So, that's what caused my problem.

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I'm guessing those are private members of your class. In C++, the members are constructed in the order they are specified in the header when the containing object is constructed. Note that this is the order of initialization of contained objects REGARDLESS of the order they are specified in the initializer list in the constructor. Probably the constructer has something like : socket_(io_service) in the initializer list, which means in the first case that io_service has been constructed when socket_ is constructed, but in the second case, it has not. –  Aaron Jan 20 '13 at 21:23
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