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I have the following:

class Parent {
public:
    virtual bool foo(vector<string> arg1, vector<string> arg2) = 0;
};

class Child : public Parent {
public:
    bool foo(vector<string> arg1, vector<string> arg2);
};

// arg1 and arg2 not used - GIVES WARNING
bool Child::foo(vector<string> arg1, vector<string> arg2) {
    return false;
}

There is no Parent implementation of foo(...) because it is a pure virtual function. The parent says that foo takes two vector arguments. The child implements it correctly with two string arguments but they're not used. HOWEVER, some children of Parent WILL use these arguments so they need to always be there.

Is there any way I can use overloading to allow foo in the given Child class not to have the arguments even though the parent says it has to?

Many thanks.

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3  
Unless you want to copy arg1 and arg2, better pass the vectors by const reference. –  KennyTM Jul 19 '11 at 20:31
1  
This is hardly an "overloading problem" -- you're talking about a minor warning here :-) –  Kerrek SB Jul 19 '11 at 20:33
    
Editing to remove overloading in title - agreed sorry :-S. –  ale Jul 19 '11 at 20:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Don't specify the parameter names:

// arg1 and arg2 not used - GIVES WARNING
bool Child::foo(vector<string>, vector<string>) {
    return false;
}

That should solve the warnings.

If your compiler for whatever reason doesn't support it - do this:

// arg1 and arg2 not used - GIVES WARNING
bool Child::foo(vector<string> arg1, vector<string> arg2) {
    (void)arg1; (void)arg2; // ignore parameters without "unused" warning
    return false;
}
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1  
Depending of your compiler, you can also use some #pragma statements to disable this warning. Under VC++: #pragma warning (disable:warningNumber). Under Borland: #pragma warn -nnn. Under GCC I don't know. –  Shlublu Jul 19 '11 at 20:33
1  
@Shlublu - yes, but I think that suppressing warnings is a bad thing, better write code that doesn't generate them. In this case it's pretty easy (although the second solution is a bit "dirty"). –  littleadv Jul 19 '11 at 20:34
    
PERFECT THANKS. Will accept when stackoverflow's solution marking time limit expires. –  ale Jul 19 '11 at 20:35
    
@littleadv: I do agree, but well, sometimes that helps. I tend to prefer a pragma directive to the second option as it doesn't involve the code itself. This if the removing the paramters' names is not sufficient of course. –  Shlublu Jul 19 '11 at 20:37
3  
you can use a macro for the second option #define UNUSED(x) (void)x and then it looks like a documentation –  Karoly Horvath Jul 19 '11 at 20:49

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