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I am not a MySQL expert by any means, but after reading the documentation for the SELECT statement, I did not find an answer to my problem.

I have this statement:

SELECT COUNT(*)=x.c FROM someTable, 
    (SELECT COUNT(*) c 
     FROM someTable 
     WHERE firstId <= secondId) x;

And I'm trying to figure out what the x.c means in the context of the query? Specifically, what is with the x that seems to be hanging out there?

I interpret the nested SELECT as SELECT COUNT(*) as c, making an alias for the row count as c, is that what the x is as well? What would it be an alias for?

Thanks!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The x is a table alias - a name for the nested SELECT statement in parentheses.

COUNT(*)=x.c

Is a boolean condition that the total row count of someTable be equal to the row count of someTable where firstId <= secondId

x.c is the column name for the count returned by the subquery.

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Thanks for the explanation, really helpful! :) –  birryree Jul 19 '11 at 20:46

They name the subquery "x" and in the subquery they name the count(*) "c". So "x.c" means the count returned by the subquery.

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Thanks for the explanation :) –  birryree Jul 19 '11 at 20:46

The x is an alias to the subquery - you will note that there is an x just after the subquery, denoting the alias name for it.

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Thanks for the explanation :) –  birryree Jul 19 '11 at 20:45

X is an alias for joined someTable and the select you joined someTable with. I guess so :D

I guessed wrong, guys over me are right :P

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Thanks, we're both learning right? –  birryree Jul 19 '11 at 20:45
    
Sure thing mate :) –  Nebril Jul 19 '11 at 20:49

x is an alias for the table (SELECT COUNT(*) c FROM someTable WHERE firstId <= secondId).

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Thanks for the help! –  birryree Jul 19 '11 at 20:45

MySQL requires that table subqueries have a unique alias. You'll notice there's an x at the end of the subquery, which makes the sub queries results appear as coming from table x.

In this case, x.c in the outer query means to refer to field c (the count result) in the aliased table x, which is the subquery.

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Thanks for the explanation :) –  birryree Jul 19 '11 at 20:46

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