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I am making a template class with an inner utility class. All specializations of the template want the same inner class:

template<...> class Outer {
    class Inner { };
};

That gives me Outer<...>::Inner but I want all Inner to be the same type, as if I'd just written:

class Inner { };
template <...> class Outer { };

or if Outer were simply not a template class:

class Outer {
    class Inner { };
};

giving me Outer::Inner. I'd like to have Outer::Inner work for all Outer<> if that's possible (just for namespace/clarity reasons). Otherwise of course I can just move Inner out.

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1  
I'm quite certain the answer is no, but I'm hoping somebody proves me wrong because I happen to be in a similar situation :) –  Dennis Zickefoose Jul 19 '11 at 21:48
1  
I'm only fairly certain the answer is no but I'm hoping for clever workarounds too... –  Ben Jackson Jul 19 '11 at 21:50
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The nested class can be a non-template, but every instantiation of the template will have its own nested class because they're (otherwise) unrelated types. You can do

namespace detail {

class Inner {};

} // detail

template<...>
class Outer {
    typedef detail::Inner Inner;
};
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Clean and sexy solution –  Armen Tsirunyan Jul 19 '11 at 22:00
    
I'm forgetting my namespace details - can class Inner be hidden, now, like it is in a "true" inner class? Or will any including code be able to have at it? –  Nate Jul 19 '11 at 22:10
    
@Nate The above behaves as with any typedef. Inner can be left incomplete with only a declaration that is not also a definition (i.e. class Inner;), with all the caveats that it implies. But it must be declared (the name detail::Inner must refer to something), or else it can't be typedef'd. –  Luc Danton Jul 19 '11 at 22:22
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The way I've done this in the past is using inheritance:

class DummyBase{
protected:
    class Inner{
        //etc...
    };
};

template<...> class Outer : public DummyBase{
    //etc...
};
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+1 This is clever, but I like Luc's answer more. –  Armen Tsirunyan Jul 19 '11 at 22:00
1  
+1, because this makes Outer<>::Inner a real class name. So class Outer<>::Inner x; or friend class Outer<>::Inner; would still work, whereas the typedef solution will fail there. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 20 '11 at 16:03
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It will be unique for each instantiation of Outer. I.e.,

Outer<int>::Inner will be a different type from Outer<double>::Inner
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1  
That fact is well-known to the OP as he has clearly stated it in his problem –  Armen Tsirunyan Jul 19 '11 at 21:59
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