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Problem Description:

In England the currency is made up of pound, £, and pence, p, and there are eight coins in general circulation:

1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1 (100p) and £2 (200p).

It is possible to make £2 in the following way:

1×£1 + 1×50p + 2×20p + 1×5p + 1×2p + 3×1p

How many different ways can £2 be made using any number of coins?

I've tried to come up with my own algorithm for this and failed. So, I came upon this one (the accepted answer). I've tried to replicate it in C++ here. When I enter 1, 2, and 5 into combos() in the main() function, it comes up with the right answer, but 10 returns 11, when it should be 12. What's wrong with my algorithm?

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

int coin[] = {1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200};

/*Amounts entered must be in pence.*/
int combinations(int amount, int size) {
    int comboCount = 0;

    if(amount > 0) {
        if(size >= 0 && amount >= coin[size])
            comboCount += combinations(amount - coin[size], size);
        if(size > 0) //don't do if size is 0
            comboCount += combinations(amount, size-1);
    } else if(amount == 0)
        comboCount++;

    return comboCount;
}

int combos(int amount) {
    int i = 0;
    //get largest coin that fits
    for(i = 7; coin[i] > amount && i >= 0; i--); 
    return combinations(amount, i);
}

int main() {
    cout << "Answer: " << combos(10) << endl;
    return 0;
}
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1  
possible duplicate of Different ways of suming specific numbers to gain 100 –  Ben Voigt Jul 19 '11 at 22:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, your code might return 11 because that's the right answer?

share|improve this answer
    
Yep. That is what I get by hand and by program. –  David Hammen Jul 19 '11 at 22:37
    
Whoops... yeah, apparently there are only 11 possibilities for 10. –  paperbd Jul 19 '11 at 22:39

(comment, actually): Sorry, but I see only 10 combinations for 10 pences out of 1, 2 and 5:

10p:    0..5*2p + rest*1p     : 6 combinations
1x5p + 5p, that is
        0..2*2p + rest*1p     : 3 combinations
        1*5p                  : 1 combination
share|improve this answer
    
1x10p coin counts, as well as 5x2p coins. –  paperbd Jul 19 '11 at 22:37
    
You can also use a single 10p coin, so 11 ways total. –  Ben Voigt Jul 19 '11 at 22:38
    
right, if there is also 10p coin, then add one more combination. (the last combination is actually 2x5p) –  ruslik Jul 19 '11 at 22:40

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