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I'm trying to write a Stored Procedure this is what I have so far

Create procedure sp_Create_order
@P_nafn varchar(50),
@P_fj int,
@P_sótt datetime,
@F_kt varchar(10),
@V_nr int,
@L_id int

as 
begin
    set nocount on

if exists(
   select * from Lotur
   where L_id=@L_id and
   @P_sótt between L_hefst and L_pfrest
)
INSERT INTO Pantar(P_nafn, P_fj, P_sótt, F_kt, V_nr, L_id) 
VALUES (@P_nafn, @P_fj, @P_sótt, @F_kt, @V_nr, @L_id)
end

but I am getting these errors

Msg 102, Level 15, State 1, Procedure sp_Create_order, Line 14 Incorrect syntax near ' '.

Msg 102, Level 15, State 1, Procedure sp_Create_order, Line 15 Incorrect syntax near ' '.

on these lines

select * from Lotur
where L_id=@L_id

and

@P_sótt, L_hefst and L_pfrest are all dates and I am tryng to put a condition on saying that nothing should be Inserted unless @P_sótt is equal to or between L_hefst and L_pfrest

share|improve this question
    
What version and flavor of SQL are you using? I was able to create this procedure without errors on SQL Server 2000 and 2005. –  harpo Mar 23 '09 at 23:05
    
I'm using mssql 2005 as soon as I replased * whith L_id it started Working –  Ingvi Mar 23 '09 at 23:40

2 Answers 2

  • Please use meaningful names for your variables
  • Do not create sp for every thing like the one above
  • Modify the query to have SELECT L_ID NOT SELECT *
  • As for the error, probably you have mistyped something
share|improve this answer
    
Does select * really matter if it's inside an exists? –  Jeffrey Hantin Mar 23 '09 at 23:05
    
The procedure as is compiles and ran for me under SQL Server 2005, it's possibly some other strange problem. –  Nick Josevski Mar 23 '09 at 23:05
    
Not sure Jeffrey...query optimizer maybe be able to optimize it, but still there's no reason to "select *" –  Albert Mar 23 '09 at 23:27
    
I'd disagree on your 2nd point -- we create stored procs for ALL database access. No direct SELECT/INSERT/UPDATE/DELETEs allowed. –  Joe Mar 24 '09 at 0:22
    
There's a huge debate on the 2nd point. My preference is to not use sp for every trivial thing. –  Albert Mar 24 '09 at 10:22

First of all, I wouldn't recommend prefixing your Stored Procedure with sp_. Performance is at least one reason why it's a bad idea.

Your stored procedure compiled ok for me. Another recommendation would be to use

if exists (
   select 1 
   from 
       Lotur
   where 
       L_id= @L_id 
       and @P_sótt between L_hefst and L_pfrest
)

as opposed to SELECT *. Did you get the error when compiling or trying to use it?

EDIT:

In response to your post about raising errors, you might want to look at RAISERROR. Here is an example of how to use it in Stored procedures

share|improve this answer
    
Is this still an issue with SQL 2005/2008? That article you referenced was from 2001. –  Simon Hartcher Mar 23 '09 at 23:26
    
IMHO, you should never use sp_ at the start of your own stored procedures. SQL Server will always look in master first –  Russ Cam Mar 23 '09 at 23:30
    
Run the profiler and try it :) I found it to be the case in 2005 - I don't know about 2008 but I suspect the same, considering MS advise against the practice –  Russ Cam Mar 23 '09 at 23:33

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