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In the below code, is there a way to avoid the if statement?

s = 13;   /*Total size*/
b = 5;    /*Block size*/
x = 0;
b1 = b;
while(x < s)
{
    if(x + b > s)
        b1 = s-x;
    SendData(x, b1);   /*SendData(offset,length);*/
    x += b1;
}

Thanks much!

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8  
the question is : Why? The if statements execution time will more than likely be less than the function call –  Mitch Wheat Jul 20 '11 at 1:47
    
You'll be spending a lot more time actually sending data than on that if. Particularly since the if is only sent on the last block! –  bdonlan Jul 20 '11 at 1:48
    
On each iteration, the if statement is evaluated. Was wondering if there is a more optimized way to code this loop. –  SkyWalker Jul 20 '11 at 1:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use a conditional move or branchless integer select to assign b1 without an if-statement:

// if a >= 0, return x, else y
// assumes 32-bit processors
inline int isel( int a, int x, int y ) // inlining is important here
{
    int mask = a >> 31; // arithmetic shift right, splat out the sign bit
    // mask is 0xFFFFFFFF if (a < 0) and 0x00 otherwise.
    return x + ((y - x) & mask);
};

// ...
while(x < s)
{
    b1 = isel( x + b - s, s-x, b1 );
    SendData(x, b1);   /*SendData(offset,length);*/
    x += b1;
}

This is only a useful optimization on in-order processors, though. It won't make any difference on a modern PC's x86, which has a fast branch and a reorder unit. It might be useful on some embedded systems (like a Playstation), where pipeline latency matters more for performance than instruction count. I've used it to shave a few microseconds in tight loops.

In theory a compiler "should" be able to turn a ternary expression (b = (a > 0 ? x : y)) into a conditional move, but I've never met one that did.

Of course, in a larger sense everyone who says that this is a pointless optimization compared to the cost of SendData() is correct. The difference between a cmov and a branch is about 4 nanoseconds, which is negligible compared to the cost of a network call. Spending your time fixing this branch which happens once per network call is like driving across town to save 1¢ on gasoline.

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I don't know maybe you'll think:

s = 13;   /*Total size*/
b = 5;    /*Block size*/
x = 0;
while(x + b < s)
{
    SendData(x, b);   /*SendData(offset,length);*/
    x += b;
}
SendData(x, s%b);

is better?

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Should be just while(x < s), though. Or even, for(x = 0; x < s; x += b) { SendData(x,b); } –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 1:50
    
More readable, but if the OP is looking for micro-optimizations the modulo might be a deal breaker. –  Chris Lutz Jul 20 '11 at 2:41

Don't waste your time on pointless micro-optimizations your compiler probably does for you anyway.

Program for the programmer; not the computer. Compilers get better and better, but programmers don't.

If it makes your program more readable (@PaulPRO's answer), then do it. Otherwise, don't.

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Are you sure the compiler always optimizes perfectly? –  Crashworks Jul 20 '11 at 2:29
    
@Crashworks No, but tommorow's compiler might. Besides, if you're worried about such a small, unnoticeable speed difference (if there is one) like that, then program in assembly, not C. –  Mateen Ulhaq Jul 20 '11 at 2:30
    
It's a bit extreme to write an entire application in assembly when I could get the same performance from just writing careful C. –  Crashworks Jul 20 '11 at 2:39
1  
@Crashworks - It's a bit extreme to micro-optimize a loop when the data sending is the real bottleneck. –  Chris Lutz Jul 20 '11 at 2:43
    
@Chris Lutz - That's a perfectly sensible criticism! –  Crashworks Jul 20 '11 at 2:44

If you try to remove if(), it might change your logic and you have to spend lot of time for testing. I see only one potential change:

s = 13;
b = 5;
x = 0;
b1 = b;
while(x < s)
{
  const unsigned int total = x + b;  // <--- introduce 'total' 
  if(total > s)
    b1 = s-x;
  SendData(x, b1);
  x = total;   // <--- reusing it
}
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This one change is questionable for so simple an operation, and will almost certainly be performed by the compiler. –  Chris Lutz Jul 20 '11 at 2:30
    
@Chris, yes for PODs it might be performed by compiler. Still it's a good habit to have DRY approach (Don't Repeat Yourself). Such attitude helps when x,b etc. where user defined types. –  iammilind Jul 20 '11 at 2:33
    
PODs are all there is in C, and I don't see a C++ tag. –  Chris Lutz Jul 20 '11 at 2:40

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