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For example I have a List<Integer> object with the following:

3, 6, 5, 3, 3, 6

The result would be 3 and 6. How can I create a function that tests for duplicates and then returns 1 value of the duplicate (not the pair, just one in the pair)? One problem that might occur is if there are quadruple values: 3, 4, 5, 3, 8, 3, 3 Then I would like to return 3 and 3. How can I accomplish this?

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Does the output order have to be stable, meaning that the pairs are output in the same order in which they appear in the input? In particular, would it violate your intended contract to emit [ 6, 3 ] given your sample input? –  seh Jul 20 '11 at 3:54
    
No it doesn't. It just have to display 3 and 6 in whatever order. –  Mohit Deshpande Jul 20 '11 at 13:28
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would go through the list counting the number of instances of each one (storing them in a map) and then create a new list from the map:

List<Integer> values = // the list of values you have
Map<Integer,Integer> counts = new HashMap<Integer,Integer>();

for(Integer value : values) {
    if(counts.containsKey(value)) {
        counts.put(value, counts.get(value)+1);
    } else {
        counts.put(value, 1);
    }
}

List<Integer> resultValues = new ArrayList<Integer>();
for(Integer value : counts.keySet()) {
    Integer valueCount = counts.get(value);
    for(int i=0; i<(valueCount/2); i++) { //add one instance for each 2
        resultValues.add(value);
    }
}
return resultValues;

This avoids the O(nlogn) behavior of sorting the values first, working in O(n) instead.

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I think the "map" way by @RHSeeger is good enough. Here I just suggest another way, just for 'fun', so that u may take a look. It kind of give a stable result: first completed pairs appears first:

List<Integer> values = ....;
List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
Set<Integer> unpairedValues = new HashSet<Integer>();

for (int i : values) {
  if (unpairedValues.contains(i)) {
    result.add(i);
    unpairedValues.remove(i);
  } else {
    unpairedValues.add(i);
  }
}
// result contains what u want
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One possible way in pseudo code:

sortedList = sort (list)
duplicates = empty list
while (length (list) > 1)
{
    if (list [0] == list [1] )
    {
         duplicates.append (list [0] )
         list.removeAt (0)
    }
    list.removeAt (0);
}
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// ArrayList<Integer> list = {3, 6, 5, 3, 3, 6}
Collections.sort(list);

ArrayList<Integer> pairs = new ArrayList<Integer>();
int last = Integer.MIN_VALUE;  // some value that will never appear in the list
for (Integer cur : list) {
    if (last == cur) {
        pairs.add(cur);
        last = Integer.MIN_VALUE;  // some value that will never appear in the list
    } else {
        last = cur;
    }
}
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(pairs.toArray()));

Will output

[3, 6]

** Edit **

Slightly better algorithm, modifies the given list

// ArrayList<Integer> list = {3, 6, 5, 3, 3, 6}
Collections.sort(list);
int index = 1, last;
while (index < list.size()) {
    last = list.remove(index - 1);
    if (list.get(index - 1) == last) {
        index++;
    }
    if (index == list.size()) {
        list.remove(index - 1);
    }
}
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