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I am going through Generics Tutorial and was going through example to copy objects from array to collection.

Code

    static void fromArrayToCollection(Object[] a, Collection<?> c) {
    for (Object o : a) { 
        c.add(o); // Compile time error
    }
}

I am thinking that I can pass object as parameter to collection and it should work without any issues but tutorial says

By now, you will have learned to avoid the beginner's mistake of trying to use Collection as the type of the collection parameter.

Why does it say that passing Object as parameter type to Collection is not correct approach? Updated:

    static void fromArrayToCollection(Object[] a, Collection<Object> c) {
    for (Object o : a) { 
        c.add(o); // Compile time error
    }
}
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3  
One of the reasons Generics exist is so that you don't have to use objects in collections –  Mitch Wheat Jul 20 '11 at 2:08
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The "beginner mistake" they're referring to is saying Collection<Object> when what you were trying to say is "any Collection/Collection of Anything." It would in the abstract be perfectly legal to declare the method as Collection<Object> it just doesn't meet the design goal of a method that takes in anything.

We want to be able to do this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String[] stringArray = {"A", "B", "C"};
    List<String> stringList = new ArrayList<String>();
    fromArrayToCollection(stringArray, stringList);
    Integer[] intArray = {1, 2, 3};
    List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    fromArrayToCollection(intArray, intList);
}

public static <T> void fromArrayToCollection(T[] array, Collection<T> collection) {
    for (T item: array) {
        collection.add(item);
    }
}

That wouldn't work if you made it Collection<Object>.

You can't declare the parameter type as Collection<Object> and have it work for multiple types like above because generic types aren't covariant. It would be illegal to say, pass in List<String> to a method with an argument type of Collection<Object>. A Collection<String> is not a Collection<Object>.

Consider the standard example:

List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
List<Object> objList = intList; //doom impending!!!
objList.add("NOTANUMBER");
int i = intList.get(0).intValue(); //runtime exception!

That's why it's illegal to declare it as Collection<Object> and take a collection of anything.

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:) ! Just as in my mind.. ! –  Ratna Dinakar Jul 20 '11 at 2:13
    
Agreed, but in this case I know that return type of fromarraytocollection function is object then why not have Collection<?> c as Collection<Object> c in fromarraytocollection method defination? –  Rachel Jul 20 '11 at 2:24
    
Because if you did the compiler wouldn't let users call it passing in a Collection of anything else besides Object. Even though you know that you're not going to do anything "unsafe" inside the method, the compiler can't guarantee that to the person using your method, so it has to disallow the behaviour. –  Affe Jul 20 '11 at 2:28
    
Now here is the thing, compiler does not give any compile time error if I use Object as parameter to collection but tutorial was saying that it's beginner mistake and I wanted to understand what passing an Object as parameter is mistake if compiler is not giving any error and what issue it would give rise to in future if it happens –  Rachel Jul 20 '11 at 2:30
1  
The method declaration is completely legal, it's just not a very useful method, because it can only turn Collections of Obects into arrays of Objects. If its purpose is to turn any collection into an array of objects, it needs to use a type parameter so that if someone wants to turn the Collection<String> or Collection<FooBar> into an array of Objects, they can still use the same one method. So it's a beginner mistake to try to say Collection<Object> when what you want the method to do is "Collection of Anything" –  Affe Jul 20 '11 at 2:33
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Your code is equivalent to the following:

static void <T> fromArrayToCollection(Object[] a, Collection<T> c) {
    for (Object o : a) { 
        c.add(o); // Compile time error
    }
}

It won't work because there is no restriction on the type of T. For example, you could set T to be Integer, and you are saying that you will add in any instance of Object into a Collection of Integer.

Hope this helps.

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Following the explanation here, it tells you that you should not rely that a Collection of Something is actually a Collection of Objects, thus they tell you that you should use a Collection of unknow, but you cannot add anything to that collection, you could corrupt it; imagine the following:

 static void fromArrayToCollection(Object[] a, Collection<?> c) {
    for (Object o : a) { 
        c.add(o); // Imagine that this will compile
    }
}

// somewhere else in the same class
Collection<String> myStrings =  new ArrayList<String>();
fromArrayToCollection(someListOfObjects, myStrings);
myStrings.get(0).doSomethingOnlyStringsDo();  // surprise, surprise, i am not a string.
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What you want is this:

static <T> void fromArrayToCollection(T[] a, Collection<T> c) {
    for (T o : a) { 
        c.add(o); // No compiler error
    }
}

You can type the array too. By declaring a typed parameter for the method, you can give that type to each of your inputs.

You could also do this:

static void fromArrayToCollection(Object[] a, Collection<? super Object> c) {
    for (Object o : a) { 
        c.add(o);  // No compiler error
    }
}

But this seems a little trite.

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I know what we need is this but my question is why can't i use object type as parameter to my collection? –  Rachel Jul 20 '11 at 2:06
    
I am not able to understand your explanation, why passing object as parameter in collection is not considered to be good approach? –  Rachel Jul 20 '11 at 2:10
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