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In Java it's written like this.. when I was porting this code... realizied there is no such thing as break <label> and continue <label>.

I know those commands were not included because there HAS to be a cleaner way of doing this when using a goto with a command..

But I ended up using.. the C# code below any way to rewrite it cleaner?

Java Code

for(JClass c : classes) {
    for(JMethod m : c.getMethods()) {
        JCode code = m.getCode();
        if(code == null)
            continue;
        label: for(int index = 0; index < code.getExceptionLookupTable().length; index++) {
            JException e = code.getExceptionTable().get(index);
            for(int index2 = e.getStartIndex(); index2 < e.getEndIndex(); index2++)
                if(code.getInstruction(index2).getOpcode() == NEW && ((NEW) code.getInstruction(index2)).getType().equals("java/lang/RuntimeException"))
                    continue label;
                if(e.getCatchTypeClassName().equals("java/lang/RuntimeException")) {
                    for(int index = e.getHandlerIndex(); index < code.getInstrLength(); index++) {
                        JInstruction instr = code.getInstruction(index);
                        if(instr.getOpcode() == ATHROW)
                            break;
                        else if(instr instanceof ReturnInstruction)
                            break label;
                    }
                    removeStuff(code, ei--);
                }
            }
    }
}

C# Code.

foreach(JClass c in classes) {
    foreach(JMethod m in c.getMethods()) {
        JCode code = m.getCode();
        if(code == null)
            continue;

        for(int index = 0; index < code.getExceptionTable().Length; index++) {
            bool continueELoop = false;
            bool breakELoop = false;
            JException e = code.getExceptionTable().get(index);
            for(int index2 = e.getStartIndex(); index2 < e.getEndIndex(); index2++) {
                if(code.getInstruction(index2).getOpcode() == JInstructions.NEW && ((NEW) code.getInstruction(index2)).getType().Equals("java/lang/RuntimeException")) {
                    continueELoop = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(continueELoop) continue;

            if(e.getCatchTypeClassName().Equals("java/lang/RuntimeException")) {
                for(int index = e.getHandlerIndex(); index < code.getInstrLength(); index++) {
                    JInstruction instr = code.getInstruction(index);
                    if (instr.getOpcode() == JInstructions.ATHROW) {
                        break;
                    } else if (isReturnInstruction(instr)) {
                        breakELoop = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                removeStuff(code, ei--);
            }
            if (breakELoop) break;
        }
    }
}

You can see when looking at the Java version then looking at the ported C# version.. the clean feeling goes away. Did I make some mistakes that can make the code shorter? or nicer looking? thanks for the help.

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3  
Maybe I'm getting old but I would break into more than one method. Than you can leverage using the return expression as pseudo break to label. –  Adam Gent Jul 20 '11 at 2:45
    
How is break label any different from a GOTO? –  Cameron Jul 20 '11 at 2:47
    
it's not but goto's do look worse then just using bool conditions.. atleast like this I can see the similarity between continue <label> and break<label>. Unless there is a way to do continue label with a goto then i'll change it. –  SSpoke Jul 20 '11 at 2:50
    
@Cameron: GOTO allows arbitrary jumps, break label can only jump to labels of parent blocks, and labels can only be attached to blocks. break label is intended to make nested breaking a little easier. –  Mark Elliot Jul 20 '11 at 3:08
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I guess, in C# you would never write such ugly code in the first place.

Here's your code refactored into multiple methods and to use LINQ with a fictional class hierarchy:

IEnumerable<JCode> GetCodes(IEnumerable<JClass> classes)
{
    return from @class in classes
           from method in @class.Methods
           where method.Code != null
           select method.Code;
}

IEnumerable<Tuple<JCode, JException>> GetCandidates(IEnumerable<JCode> codes)
{
    return from code in codes
           from ex in code.ExceptionTable
           where !code.Instructions
                      .Skip(ex.Start)
                      .Take(ex.End - ex.Start + 1)
                      .Any(i => i.OpCode == New && ...)
           select Tuple.Create(code, ex);
}

and then

void RewriteMethods(IEnumerable<JClass> classes)
{
    var codes = GetCodes(classes);

    var candidates = GetCandidates(codes);

    foreach (var candidate in candidates)
    {
        var code = candidate.Item1;
        var ex = candidate.Item2;

        var instructionsToRemove = code.Instructions
                                       .Skip(ex.HandlerStart)
                                       .TakeWhile(i => i.OpCode != Return)
                                       .Where(i => i.OpCode == AThrow);

        code.RemoveAll(instructionsToRemove);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
too much to ask from someone coming from java to straightaway write linq –  Pinakin Shah Jul 20 '11 at 3:07
1  
You're probably right. But why switch to C# if you want to write ugly Java code? –  dtb Jul 20 '11 at 3:10
    
Haha definitely looks cleaner.. but you're right Pinaktin Linq looks alien, a bit like SQL to me :P I probably won't have the ability to write Linq code myself so why should I just copy/paste this.. i wont't understand how to modify it if a bug is ever found. Maybe I can remove some of the redundant code with RemoveAll instead.. I like functional coding more. But ehh this is the best answer I guess I'll mark it, it will help alot of googlers for sure. –  SSpoke Jul 20 '11 at 3:15
    
Sooner or later you'll want to write idiomatic C# code, and not messy code that looks like Java. LINQ is one of the top reasons to do this much sooner than later. –  dtb Jul 20 '11 at 3:19
    
@SSpoke I agree with dtb that Linq will change your programming. Even for long time C# programmers it took some learning. If you are not a NGO (anti-microsoft :)), you will start loving it.. –  Pinakin Shah Jul 20 '11 at 3:33
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Break and Continue are kind of shortcuts

I would rather use If / Else construct to format this better and make it cleaner. You can get rid of the continue statements in both the languagues. You can do the same for break by putting an additional condition in your for loops. Again this is a personal preference.

e.g.

 if(code == null) continue;

to

if(code != null)
{

}
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If we're purely talking about language specification, there is nothing equivalent to continue and break in C#. Only thing that looks like that is goto which is not really a replacement. I doubt such thing will be included in future c# versions as Anders Hejlsberg seems to dislike anything that can mess with code coherency.

There is no document that says that some functionality is not implemented, so I can only refer you to another answer to such question on stackoverflow :) C# equivalent to Java's continue <label>?

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