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I try very simple test:

public static void main(String[] args) {
     test(2);
}

public static void test(int i) {
    i--;
    System.out.println("i="+i);
    if (i < 0)
        return;

    System.out.println("test1");
    test(i);
    System.out.println("test2");
    test(i);
}

Output:

i=1
test1
i=0
test1
i=-1
test2
i=-1
test2
i=0
test1
i=-1
test2
i=-1

I cannot understand why variable i in second call (test2) has value 0 after that already has 0 ? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
tricky example, I´m using a debugger to go step by step, it could show you the recursivite happening –  Jaime Hablutzel Jul 20 '11 at 3:39
    
@user710818 Check my answer :) –  Eng.Fouad Jul 20 '11 at 3:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I find indenting the output will help explain these things, each level here corresponds to the depth of the call stack (how many recursions deep you are), and the sequence corresponds to when these things are executed:

i=1
test1
  i=0 (invoked on the test1 path)
  test1
    i=-1 (invoked on the test1 path)
  test2
    i=-1 (invoked on the test2 path)
test2
  i=0 (invoked on the test2 path)
  test1
    i=-1 (invoked on the test 1 path)
  test2
    i=-1 (invoked on the test 2 path)

Notice that under each indentation level there are are invocations under the headings "test1" and "test2", this is because you recursively call test under each of these headings, and so at each execution of test you recurse twice.

Let's backup a bit and take a simpler case, if you were to execute test(1), you would expect to see:

i=0
  test1
    i=-1
  test2
    i=-1

Because you call test under the headings "test1" and "test2" you're causing two paths to be navigated, one path under the "test1" heading, and a second under the "test2" heading.

When you call test(2), your code roughly does this: (recursions omitted)

(i = 2)
Decrement i  (i = 1)
Print i
Print "test1"
Call test(i) (test(1))
Print "test2"
Call test(i) (test(1))

...and remember, each time you call test(1), your code roughly does this: (recursions omitted)

(i = 1)
Decrement i  (i = 0)
Print i
Print "test 1"
Call test(i) (test(0))
Print "test 2"
Call test(i) (test(0))

If you replace each call in the first block with the output of the test(1) block you'll see it exactly generates your output.

Basically, you get two i=0 prints because you recurse twice in each function call.

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Your calls execute in the following order:

test(2);           //initial call;    prints "1"
    test(1);       //test1;           prints "0"
        test(0);   //test1;           prints "-1"
        test(0);   //test2;           prints "-1"
    test(1);       //test2;           prints "0"
        test(0);   //test1;           prints "-1"
        test(0);   //test2;           prints "-1"
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Integers are passed by value and not by reference. The changes to i inside test do not effect the i of the calling context.

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This might help you visualize it. The number of hyphens represents the call depth and output at that level, where one hyphen is the first level (the initial call), two represents the second level, and so on.

->i=1
->test1
-->i=0
-->test1
--->i=-1
-->test2
--->i=-1
->test2
-->i=0
-->test1
--->i=-1
-->test2
--->i=-1

Also for debugging purposes, consider tracking the depth when you recurse, this way your output can be nicely tagged.

public static void test(int i, int depth) {
    i--;
    // ...
    test(i, depth++);
}
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Each call to test has it's own copy of i.

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Java passes arguments by value, not by reference. Think about your function calls in terms of what you passed in. Something like this:

Main call:

test(2);

In function, you decrement i, making it 1, then call this:

test(i); // This is equivalent to calling test(1)
test(i); // This is equivalent to calling test(1) again.

And so your recursive function is just repeated and shows you the subsequent values 0, -1, -1 - only it shows it twice.

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public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
         test(2); // #1
    }
    public static void test(int i)
    {
        i--; // #2 i = 2 -> 1 #7 i = 1 -> 0 #12 i = 0 -> -1 #18 i = 0 -> -1 #24 i = 1 -> 0 #29 i = 0 -> -1 #35 i = 0 -> -1
        System.out.println("i="+i); // #3 i = 1 #8 i = 0 #13 i = -1 #19 i = -1 #25 i = 0 #30 i = -1 #36 i = -1
        if (i < 0) // #4 i = 1 #9 i = 0 #14 i = -1 #20 i = -1 #26 i = 0 #31 i = -1 #37 i = -1
            return; // #15 i = -1 #21 i = -1 #32 i = -1 #38 i = -1

        System.out.println("test1"); // #5 i = 1 #10 i = 0 #27 i = 0
        test(i); // #6 i = 1 #11 i = 0 #28 i = 0
        System.out.println("test2"); // #16 i = 0 #22 i = 1 #33 i = 0
        test(i); // #17 i = 0 #23 i = 1 #34 i = 0
    }
}

Output:

i=1     // #3
test1   // #5
i=0     // #8
test1   // #10
i=-1    // #13
test2   // #16
i=-1    // #19
test2   // #22
i=0     // #25
test1   // #27
i=-1    // #30
test2   // #34
i=-1    // #36
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