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I came across this syntax recently for try-catch for function.

struct A
{
  int a;

  A (int i) : a(i)  // normal syntax
  {
    try {}
    catch(...) {}
  }

  A ()   // something different
  try : a(0) {}
  catch(...) {}

  void foo ()  // normal function
  try {}
  catch(...) {}
};

Both syntax are valid. Is there any technical difference between these syntax apart from coding style ? Is one of the syntax superior to other by any aspect ?

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1  
The fact that they compile doesn't really mean they are valid. Might be an extension. Anyhow, +1 for very interesting syntax - never saw it before :) –  BЈовић Jul 20 '11 at 6:58
7  
@VJo: That is standard C++, not recommended, but standard. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 20 '11 at 7:44
    
There was an interesting gotw on this topic: gotw.ca/gotw/066.htm... –  Nim Jul 20 '11 at 9:02
    
@Als, I see, it was in the comments and I did not see it... –  Nim Jul 20 '11 at 9:42
1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/3888896/… –  Armen Tsirunyan Jul 22 '11 at 13:15
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4 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The First Syntax:
The scope of the try block starts after the Member Initialization list has been completed, So any exception thrown during Member Initialization will not be caught by this try-catch block.

The second syntax:
It ensures that if an exception gets thrown during Member Initialization list then you are able to catch the exception.

The Third Syntax:
It ensures that any exception thrown from betwen the starting brace of the try block inside the function body gets caught appropriately, It would mean any exception caused during the argument passing(if any can occur) will not be caught in this try-catch block.

So yes they are disinctly different in what functionality they provide.


EDIT:
Some guidelines to be considered while using the second syntax(function-try-block) in constructors & destructors:

As per the C++ Standard,

If the catch block does not throw (either rethrow the original exception, or throw something new), and control reaches the end of the catch block of a constructor or destructor, then the original exception is automatically rethrown.

In Simple words:
A constructor or destructor function-try-block's handler code MUST finish by emitting some exception.

Guideline 1:
Constructor function-try-block handlers have only one purpose -- to translate an exception. (And maybe to do logging or some other side effects.) They are not useful for any other purpose.

Throwing a exception from destructors is an bad idea, Take a look here to know why.
Guideline 2:
Destructor function-try-blocks have no practical use at all. There should never be anything for them to detect, and even if there were something to detect because of evil code, the handler is not very useful for doing anything about it because it can not suppress the exception.

Guideline 3:
Always clean up unmanaged resource acquisition in local try-block handlers within the constructor or destructor body, never in constructor or destructor function-try-block handlers.


For Standardese Fans:

C++ standard, clause 15.3, paragraph 15:

If a return statement appears in a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor, the program is ill-formed.

C++ standard, clause 15.3, paragraph 16:

The exception being handled is rethrown if control reaches the end of a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor or destructor. Otherwise, a function returns when control reaches the end of a handler for the function-try-block (6.6.3). Flowing off the end of a function-try-block is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function (6.6.3).


References:
Have a look at this must read resource here for more details & explanation.

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1  
For the third one, did you mean exceptions caused during the argument passing will be caught (you currently have "will not be caught"). –  Matt Smith Jul 20 '11 at 4:59
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The explanation is incomplete to the point of being incorrect. –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 20 '11 at 5:50
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@Matt Smith: The try block starts with the opening brace of try, So I meant exactly what I said. –  Alok Save Jul 20 '11 at 5:54
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@Als: I believe that there is a specific behavior for function try/catch blocks in case you do not return in the catch, and that is the exception is rethrown. I may apply only to destructors... not sure. –  Matthieu M. Jul 20 '11 at 6:18
2  
@Matthieu M. §15.3/15 If a return statement appears in a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor, the program is ill-formed. §15.3/16 The exception being handled is rethrown if control reaches the end of a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor or destructor. Otherwise, a function returns when control reaches the end of a handler for the function-try-block (6.6.3). Flowing off the end of a function-try-block is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function (6.6.3). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 20 '11 at 18:43
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Function-try-block is useful mostly in constructors, because there is no other way of catching exceptions in initialization list. In destructors one must be careful to return in catch block, because exception will be automatically re-thrown. (And in good design destructors must not throw.) In normal functions this feature is not useful. Edit: an old but still good article: http://drdobbs.com/184401316

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Interesting article, thank you. Bear in mind though that SO policy is to fight hyperlink rot by summing up the article. Just so that your answer does not become meaningless if the link went dead. –  Matthieu M. Jul 20 '11 at 6:20
    
@Matthieu: good rule, with two problems: summary is often much worse than original, and ... I'm just too lazy for that :-) –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 20 '11 at 6:31
    
then your answer is doomed to stay at the bottom where nobody will read it :/ Too bad since the link is quite interesting. –  Matthieu M. Jul 20 '11 at 7:00
    
The exception is rethrown only in the case of function-try-block s in constructors or destructors. In the rest of the functions the behavior is exactly that of a try-block that enclosed all the other code in the function. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 20 '11 at 7:56
    
+1, Nice but lengthy link! –  iammilind Jul 20 '11 at 8:58
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Might as well cite the spec... Or at least a draft.

Section 15 (4):

A function-try-block associates a handler-seq with the ctor-initializer, if present, and the compound-statement. An exception thrown during the execution of the compound statement or, for constructors and destructors, during the initialization or destruction, respectively, of the class’s subobjects, transfers control to a handler in a function-try-block in the same way as an exception thrown during the execution of a try-block transfers control to other handlers.

(Here the handler-seq is the stuff after the catch and the compound-statement is the function body.)

So the "function try block" on a constructor or destructor catches exceptions thrown by the ctor-initializers and by the construction or destruction of subobjects.

On a function other than a constructor or destructor, it is the same as simply wrapping the function body. (Well, as far as I can discern from reading the spec.)

Interesting feature, and new to me. Thanks for bringing it up.

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catches exceptions thrown by the ctor-initializers and by the construction or destruction of subobjects -- it's quite an understatement. –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 20 '11 at 5:52
    
On a function other than a constructor or destructor, it is the same as simply wrapping the function body -- it's most definitely not! –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 20 '11 at 5:53
    
@Gene: Explain? Your own answer says "In normal functions this feature is not useful". (Note that the "automatic re-throw" behavior you so cleverly allude to only happens for constrictors and destructors.) So, explain? –  Nemo Jul 20 '11 at 13:25
    
@ Nemo: I included comment about normal functions in my answer above. –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 20 '11 at 17:47
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The "something different" example puts the processing of the initializer list within the scope of the try block.

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2  
+1 Interesting. –  Josh Jul 20 '11 at 4:20
    
If that were the only difference. The significant difference is that it's impossible to access the object members in constructor function-try-block and at the end of catch the original exception is re-thrown (unless taken care). –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 20 '11 at 5:48
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