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I have a string,

my $element="abc#$def"

I escape # using,

 $element=~s/#/\\#/g;

It is printed as: abc\#$def, which is perfect.

Next part of the code is:

push(@arr,$element);
foreach $val (@arr)
{
 print $val;
}

And the value printed within the foreach loop is: abc#$def.

Why is # not escaped here? And how can I retain the escaping?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not quite showing us everything. To get your claimed result, I had to create the variable $def initialized as shown below. But, when I do that, I get the result you expect, not the result you show.

$ cat xx.pl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $def = '$def';
my $element = "abc#$def";

$element =~ s/#/\\#/g;

print "$element\n";

my @arr;

push(@arr, $element);
foreach my $val (@arr)
{
    print $val;
    print "\n";
}

$ perl xx.pl
abc\#$def
abc\#$def
$

This was tested with Perl 5.14.1 on MacOS X 10.6.8, but I don't think the behaviour would vary with any other version of Perl 5.

Given this, can you update your question to show a script similar to mine (in particular, with both use strict; and use warnings;) but which produces the result you show?

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Thanks Jonathan, I had missed "use strict", wonder if that was the reason. Working as needed. :) –  Mini Jul 20 '11 at 6:19

With something like this:

$element=~s/#/\\#/g;

You have to escape the \

Edit

this code works on my machine as you expect:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $element='abc#$def';
my @arr;
$element=~s/#/\\#/g;

print $element."\n";

push(@arr,$element);
foreach my $val (@arr)
{
 print $val;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You mean, $element=~s/#/\\\#/g; right? Even this shows the same behaviour. –  Mini Jul 20 '11 at 5:21
    
hmm...no, I meant exactly what is in your code also, because at first it looked like you had a single `\` character in your replace expression –  Tudor Constantin Jul 20 '11 at 5:23
    
Ok.. It does get escaped. But behaviour changes when it is read from an array as I have explained. –  Mini Jul 20 '11 at 5:27
1  
When I altered the formatting from 'running text' to code, there were two backslashes in the text of the question. I'm not sure whether @Mini was handling that correctly. Mostly what I did was add blank lines after the running text to let the code stand out as code - the exception, of course, is the output embedded in with running text. If need be, Mini can update the code to reflect what is in the program causing trouble; I've already asked for an executable example. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 20 '11 at 5:32
    
@Mini - I think the lack of use strict and use warnings is giving you side effects from other parts of the code –  Tudor Constantin Jul 20 '11 at 5:35

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