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I have a property that returns a HashTable. I would like to sort it without refactoring my property. Please note: I do not want to return another type. Code:

    /// <summary>
    /// All content containers.
    /// </summary>
    public Hashtable Containers
    {
        get
        {
            Hashtable tbl = new Hashtable();
            foreach (Control ctrl in Form.Controls)
            {
                if (ctrl is PlaceHolder)
                {
                    tbl.Add(ctrl.ID, ctrl);
                }
                // Also check for user controls with content placeholders.
                else if (ctrl is UserControl)
                {
                    foreach (Control ctrl2 in ctrl.Controls)
                    {
                        if (ctrl2 is PlaceHolder)
                        {
                            tbl.Add(ctrl2.ID, ctrl2);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            return tbl;
        }
    }
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+1 Because of downvote! It's a perfectly valid question from someone that doesn't understand what a HashTable is! –  Robin Day Mar 24 '09 at 0:52
    
+1 because of downvote. Question shows poster doesn't know how HashTables work, but is a perfectly valid topic. –  snemarch Mar 24 '09 at 0:57
    
-1. Question is meaningless and poster should write a question that makes sense after finding out how hash tables work. Indeed, it's a fine topic, but not a fine question. –  mquander Mar 24 '09 at 1:11
1  
@agassan: I cleaned up your post a bit so that it was more cohesive and removed the LINQ question since that didn't seem to be what you were really asking. Feel free to rollback if you don't like this. –  John Feminella Mar 24 '09 at 1:14
    
+1 because of downvote, but also because it's a decent question. BTW, see stackoverflow.com/questions/2453624/unsort-hashtable for more on the sortation of HTs and new user confusion. –  bill weaver Apr 20 '12 at 15:40

10 Answers 10

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Another option is to construct the hash table as you're already doing, and then simply construct a sorted set from the keys. You can iterate through that sorted key set, fetching the corresponding value from the hash table as needed.

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This is exactly how I was able to make it work. –  user81740 Mar 24 '09 at 13:32

Hashtables work by mapping keys to values. Implicit in this mapping is the concept that the keys aren't sorted or stored in any particular order.

However, you could take a look at SortedDictionary<K,V>.

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Thanks. Works great. I was very easy to reactor property since most of my drop down elements using Key Pair Value –  user81740 Mar 24 '09 at 23:45

lubos is right: you can't sort a HashTable. If you could, it wouldn't be a HashTable. You can enumerate the HashTable, and then sort the enumeration. But that would be very slow. Much better to use a SortedDictionary instead.

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Sorry, but you can't sort hashtable. You will have to refactor your code to use some sortable collections.

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I am quite sure that hash tables cannot be sorted ... ;)

Wikipedia Hash Table

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You will need to return something other than a hash table. I won't reiterate what you claim to understand already, but you need to rethink whatever part of your design requires you to return sorted objects in a hash table.

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Not exactly a C# answer but I am sure you can make something of it.

In Perl it is common to "sort" a hash table for use in output to the display.

For example:

print "Items: ";
foreach (sort keys %items) {
    print $_, '=', $items{$_}, ' ';
}

The trick here is that Perl doesn't sort the hash, it is sorting a copied list of hash keys. It should be easy enough in C# to extract the hash keys into a list and then sort that list.

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I have done that, by creating SortList object then loop over hashtable values and placed values into SortList and then sortList.Sort() –  user81740 Mar 24 '09 at 13:20

There is no point in sorting a hash table because you already have almost constant lookup time. Or at worst O(B) where B is the bucket size.

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Of course hash tables can be sorted, but you need to first define what it means to sort a hash table. (Therein lies the issue)

Once you have done that, however, you've invariably removed all the advantages that a hashtable can give you, and you might as well use a sorted array (with binary searching), or use a red-black tree instead.

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I am a new programmer so take everything I say with a grain of salt. But here is what I did when I ran into a similar situation. I created a class that had two variables and then created a List object off those variables and then I used linq to sort those variables.

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