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I have a very large array which must be 262144 elements in length (and potentially much larger in future). I have tried allocating the array on the stack like so:

#define SIZE 262144
int myArray[SIZE];

However, it appears that when I try and add elements past a certain point, the values are different when I try to access them. I understand that this is because there is only a finite amount of memory on the stack, as opposed to the heap which has more memory.

I have tried the following without much luck (does not compile):

#define SIZE 262144
int *myArray[SIZE] = new int[SIZE];

And then I considered using malloc, but I was wondering if there was a more C++ like way of doing this...

#define SIZE 262144
int *myArray = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int) * SIZE);

Should I just go with malloc?

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change "myArray[SIZE]" to "myArray" in your second block of code. –  eduffy Mar 24 '09 at 1:10
    
bad question ! please learn the syntax of the language. –  Warrior Mar 24 '09 at 9:29
1  
Vijay, this isn't a question of learning the syntax. The first option is correct, except for the size, and the second option is a common enough bug that it deserves mention. Besides, isn't this site also about helping when someone doesn't understand the syntax? –  Nathan Fellman Mar 24 '09 at 10:08
1  
To have a syntax error in a question doesn't make it a bad question. –  Lena Schimmel Mar 24 '09 at 10:08
1  
Straight from the FAQ: No question is too trivial or too "newbie". Be tolerant of others who may not know everything you know. Bring your sense of humor. –  E Dominique Mar 24 '09 at 11:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You'll want to use new like such:

int *myArray = new int[SIZE];

I'll also mention the other side of this, just in case....

Since your transitioning from the stack to the heap, you'll also need to clean this memory up when you're done with it. On the stack, the memory will automatically cleanup, but on the heap, you'll need to delete it, and since its an array, you should use:

delete [] myArray;

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Great above & beyond info. +1 –  John MacIntyre Mar 24 '09 at 1:18

The more C++ way of doing it is to use vector. Then you don't have to worry about deleting the memory when you are done; vector will do it for you.

#include <vector>

std::vector<int> v(262144);
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but boost::shared_array may be more appropriate for super sized arrays depending on the use case. –  Functastic Mar 24 '09 at 2:36
    
It sounds as if vector is perfect for his case. If an array would have worked on the stack, a vector will replace the array just fine. –  Zan Lynx Mar 24 '09 at 2:41
    
Yeah I considered vector... I just figured array would be better memory wise, but thinking about it, that doesn't make sense... vector may even be more memory efficient, right? –  nbolton Mar 24 '09 at 2:44
    
@Nick: well it won't be more efficient, but it will be far easier and safer to use. –  Brian Neal Mar 24 '09 at 3:25
    
Why boost::shared_array? The OP isn't asking about reference counting, and std::vector is sufficent for most cases. That, and std::vector optimizes down to a bald array, which you really can't beat without an algorithmic change. –  Tom Mar 24 '09 at 4:25

As the number is not necessarily known at compile time, the type is a pointer:

int *myArray = new int[262144];
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that compiles. However, even after using heap memory, I still have random numbers at the end of my array after assigning. Any ideas? –  nbolton Mar 24 '09 at 1:12
    
I don't know. Post the way you assign into the question, so all of us can have a look at it –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 24 '09 at 1:16

new allocates on the heap.

#define SIZE 262144
int * myArray = new int[SIZE];
share|improve this answer

I believe

#define SIZE 262144
int *myArray[SIZE] = new int[262144];

should be

#define SIZE 262144
int *myArray = new int[262144];

or better yet

#define SIZE 262144
int *myArray = new int[SIZE];
share|improve this answer

The reason the first try didn't work is that the syntax is incorrect. Try this:

int *myArray = new int[SIZE];
share|improve this answer

Your syntax for using new was wrong, it should be:

int *myArray = new int[262144];

you only need to put the size on the right of the assignment.

However, if you're using C++ you might want to look at using std::vector (which you will have) or something like boost::scoped_array to make the the memory management a bit easier.

share|improve this answer
    
std::vector should be recommended as well, since it's actually part of C++, and not just a "pretty good addition" to the language. –  Tom Mar 24 '09 at 4:27
    
That's a very good point –  Wilka Mar 24 '09 at 9:54

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