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I am learning Ruby Singletons and i found some ways to define and get list of Class and Object singleton methods.

Class Singleton Methods

Ways to define class singleton methods:

class MyClass

  def MyClass.first_sing_method
    'first'
  end

  def self.second_sing_method
    'second'
  end

  class << self
    def third_sing_method
      'third'
    end
  end

  class << MyClass
    def fourth_sing_method
      'fourth'
    end
  end
end

def MyClass.fifth_sing_method
  'fifth'
end

MyClass.define_singleton_method(:sixth_sing_method) do
  'sixth'
end

Ways to get list of class singletons methods:

#get singleton methods list for class and it's ancestors 
MyClass.singleton_methods

#get singleton methods list for current class only  
MyClass.methods(false)

Object Singleton Methods

Ways to define object singleton methods

class MyClass
end

obj = MyClass.new

class << obj
  def first_sing_method
    'first'
  end
end

def obj.second_sing_method
  'second'
end

obj.define_singleton_method(:third_sing_method) do
  'third'
end

Way to get list of object singleton methods

#get singleton methods list for object and it's ancestors  
obj.singleton_methods

#get singleton methods list for current object only
obj.methods(false)

Are there other ways to do this?

share|improve this question
    
I think you've got them all. –  Andy Jul 20 '11 at 10:15
1  
Even though this question has been answered long ago, for completeness: you can also use methods class_eval and instance_eval. For instance: obj.instance_eval {def hi;puts "hi";end}, or Object.class_eval {def self.foo;puts "foo";end} (this is just the same as extending via open classes), or as last: Object.instance_eval{def bar;puts "bar";end} (this opens the virtual class of Object. Even though self is the same as the previous,it still is in a different environment!) –  froginvasion Jan 9 '13 at 8:36
    
Nice sum up, should be a wiki –  Chuntao Lu Aug 28 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

First of all, the way to list singleton methods is with singleton_methods. The methods method lists all the methods available. It seems to be declared in Kernel, but it is not documented anywhere (except this C source code).

Try extending an instance. It is one of the most elegant ways, as it supports code reuse and seems to me very object-oriented:

class Foo
  def bar
    puts "Hi"
  end
end

module Bar
  def foo
    puts "Bye"
  end
end

f = Foo.new
f.bar
#=> hi

f.extend Bar
f.foo
#=> bye

f.methods(false)
#=> []
# the module we extended from is not a superclass
# therefore, this must be empty, as expected

f.singleton_methods
#=> ["foo"]
# this lists the singleton method correctly

g = Foo.new
g.foo
#=> NoMethodError

Edit: In the comment you asked why methods(false) returns nothing in this case. After reading through the C code it seems that:

  • methods returns all the methods available for the object (also the ones in included modules) (though declared in Kernel, there seems to be no documentation)
  • singleton_methods returns all the singleton methods for the object (also the ones in included modules) (documentation)
  • singleton_methods(false) returns all the singleton methods for the object, but not those declared in included modules
  • methods(false) supposedly returns the singleton methods by calling singleton_methods, but it also passes the parameter false to it; whether this is a bug or a feature - I do not know

Hopefully, this clarifies the issue a little. Bottom line: call singleton_methods, seems more reliable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, nice feature, i didn't know about it. But why methods(false) don't show added method? –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jul 20 '11 at 11:09
    
I can also extend class this way –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jul 20 '11 at 11:15
    
I experimented with methods(false) and concluded that method(false) show only own object's methods, it not show methods from upper classes in ancestor chain –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jul 20 '11 at 11:32
    
at previous deleted comment you said that methods() is alias for instance_methods(), is it true? In this case how instance_methods() can return singleton methods? Singleton and instance methods are different. –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jul 20 '11 at 11:47
    
sorry for a lot of questions, but i try to understand –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jul 20 '11 at 11:51

Some more ways:

Class singleton methods

class << MyClass
  define_method :sixth_sing_method do
    puts "sixth"
  end
end

class MyClass
  class << self
    define_method :fourth_sing_method do
      puts "seventh"
    end
  end
end

Object singleton methods

class << obj
  define_method :fourth_sing_method do
    puts "fourth"
  end
end

Next, you can use define_method and define_singleton_method in combination with send, e.g.

obj.send :define_singleton_method, :nth_sing_method, lambda{ puts "nth" }

and all possible combinations thereof. To use define_method, you need to capture the singleton class first as in this (the same works for class objects, too)

singleton_class = class << obj; self end
singleton_class.send :define_method, :nth_sing_method, lambda{ puts "nth" }

Another ways is using class_eval on the singleton class objects:

singleton_class.class_eval do
  def nth_sing_method
    puts "nth"
  end
end

And then you once again may combine send with class_eval...

There are myriads of ways, I guess :)

share|improve this answer

Object singleton methods

instance_eval

class A
end

a = A.new

a.instance_eval do
def v 
"asd"
end
end

 a.singleton_methods
 => [:z, :v] 
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