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I'm developing an app for iOS4. The application is made of two main components, one that is supposed to run in the background and one that is constantly displayed on screen and takes data from the first one. Here's the problem: the first component works just fine until it is put in the background. At that point it stops sending data. Why is that? Is there any workaround?

Thank you.

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Another SO Post here. –  EmptyStack Jul 20 '11 at 10:43
1  
There is no workaround. Apple will reject an application if you use VoIP, Audio or GPS as an excuse to keep running in the background. Those tasks have to be related to the core functionality of your application. –  Jano Jul 20 '11 at 10:52
    
This is very clearly covered in the documentation. –  bshirley Jul 20 '11 at 17:35
    
So the whole operating system is junk. I'll read the linked documentation, thank you. –  Ricky Robinson Jul 20 '11 at 19:15

4 Answers 4

If you're not using VoIP, Audio or GPS you can only use the task completion mode (which is limited to 10 minutes in background). To do that you have to tell the OS you want to start a task with:

UIApplication*    app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];

UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier bgTask = [app beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{
    [app endBackgroundTask:bgTask];
    bgTask = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;
}];

and when you're done, you can end it with:

[app endBackgroundTask:bgTask];
bgTask = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;

Remember that if your running longer than 10 minutes, the OS will kill your app.

In applicationDidEnterBackground: you have the problem that your code still blocks the main thread, which is why it's killed when you exit the app.

If you want to start executing code in applicationDidEnterBackground: you should begin the background task and dispatch whatever it is you want to do with dispatch_async(queue, block_with_your_code);

You can read more on it here

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THank you, voidStern. It is not clear to me where I should put that piece of code you posted. I tried with ` - (void)applicationDidEnterBackground:(UIApplication )application { UIApplication app = [UIApplication sharedApplication]; bgTask = [app beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{ [app endBackgroundTask:bgTask]; bgTask = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid; }]; }` –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 9:51
    
...but that didn't change anything. –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 9:51
1  
Added explanation where to use the code to the answer (can't really format code in comments). –  voidStern Jul 22 '11 at 14:47
    
Thanks a lot. I would still prefer to use the audio option, but in case that doesn't work, I will try this. Thank you, again! –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 20:52

There is non you are only allowed to run VOIP, Audio or Locationbased apps in the background. So unless you apps falls in one of those categories there is no way to keep you app working in the background.

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I could play music in the background, even though it has nothing to do with my application. –  Ricky Robinson Jul 20 '11 at 19:13
    
Hey rckoenes, thank you for the reply. I tried to make my app play a sound file in the background, but that didn't change anything, even with required background mode set on "app plays audio". I used AVAudioPlayer library. Is that wrong? Should I have used something else? –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 9:55

Apple allows only certain types of apps to run in the background, like navigation and VOIP apps, to name just two. But even those are limited to only the necessary tasks.

The only alternative are "longrunning background tasks" - this allows an app to continue working in the background for up to ten minutes (the exact duration of this "grace period" is subject to change, afaik). You may obvserve this on apps like Hipstamatic, which will finish postproduction on images even when the app is being moved to the background.

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Hey Toastor, thank you for the reply. I tried to make my app play a sound file in the background, but that didn't change anything, even with required background mode set on "app plays audio". Do you know how to implement exactly the second option you mentioned? –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 9:54

As others have pointed out there's no real way to do this, but there is a workaround some apps use. You basically play a track from the users iPod library in the background, which enables your app to stay working in the background for a longer time. You can read more about it on Tapbots' site.

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Hey, so that doesn't work. I'm using AVAudioPlayer library, but even with Required Background Modes set with option "app plays audio", the application won't go in background mode. Am I supposed to use a different sound library? –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 9:49
    
I'm sorry, but I'm afraid I can't help you more with that. I've never needed anything like this in one of my apps and just stumbled upon the Pastebot article a while ago. –  Frog Jul 22 '11 at 10:10
    
No problem. The audio library doesn't seem to be the problem anyway, at least according to the official developer's guide. –  Ricky Robinson Jul 22 '11 at 10:19

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