Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I always used (a)Nullable<>.HasValue because I liked the semantics. However, recently I was working on someone else's existing code base where they used (b)Nullable<> == null exclusively instead. Is there a reason to use one over the other, or is it purely preference?

(a)

int? a;
if(a.HasValue)
    ...

(b)

int? b;
if(b != null)
    ...
share|improve this question
6  
I asked a similar question... got some good answers:stackoverflow.com/questions/633286/… – nailitdown Mar 24 '09 at 3:32
1  
Seems like (a) has an extraneous '!', shouldn't it be if (a.HasValue) to better compare with (b)? – Dave Mar 24 '09 at 4:16
    
Yeah, it should. Thanks. – lc. Mar 24 '09 at 5:10
2  
Personally, I'd use HasValue since I think words tend to be more readable than symbols. It's all up to you though, and what fits with your existing style. – Jake Petroules May 31 '10 at 13:16
up vote 234 down vote accepted

The compiler replaces null comparisons with a call to HasValue, so there is no real difference. Just do whichever is more readable/makes more sense to you and your colleagues.

share|improve this answer
58  
I would add to that "whichever is more consistent/follows an existing coding style." – Josh Lee Mar 24 '09 at 4:08
3  
Wow. I hate this syntactic sugar. int? x = null gives me the illusion that a nullable instance is a reference type. But the truth is that Nullable<T> is a value type. It feels I'd get a NullReferenceException to do: int? x = null; Use(x.HasValue). – KFL Nov 4 '14 at 1:03
2  
@KFL If the syntactic sugar bothers you, just use Nullable<int> instead of int?. – Cole Johnson Mar 20 '15 at 23:08
    
"Just do whichever is more readable/makes more sense." That is what I said today. :D – anIBMer Aug 26 '15 at 11:27
1  
In the early stages of creating an application you might think it's sufficent to use a nullable value type to store some data, only to realize after a while that you need a proper class for your purpose. Having written the original code to compare with null then has the advantage that you don't need to search/replace every call to HasValue() with a null comparison. – Anders Dec 16 '15 at 12:34

I prefer (a != null) so that the syntax matches reference types.

share|improve this answer
    
Which is quite misleading, of course, since Nullable<> is not a reference type. – Luaan Aug 5 '15 at 9:22
1  
Yes, but the fact usually matters very little at the point you are null checking. – cbp Aug 7 '15 at 4:41
2  
It's only misleading to the conceptually confused. Using a consistent syntax for two different types does not imply that they are the same type. C# has nullable reference types (all reference types are currently nullable, but that will change in the future) and nullable value types. Using a consistent syntax for all nullable types makes sense. In no way does it imply that nullable value types are reference types, or that nullable reference types are value types. – Jim Balter Oct 11 '15 at 16:43

In VB.Net. Do NOT use "IsNot Nothing" when you can use ".HasValue". I just solved an "Operation could destabilize the runtime" Medium trust error by replacing "IsNot Nothing" with ".HasValue" In one spot. I don't really understand why, but something is happening differently in the compiler. I would assume that "!= null" in C# may have the same issue.

share|improve this answer
15  
That would not be a correct assumption. – Rex M Jun 14 '11 at 22:32
4  
I would prefer HasValue because of readability. IsNot Nothing is really an ugly expression (because of the double negation). – Stefan Steinegger Jul 8 '13 at 9:05
8  
@steffan "IsNot Nothing" isn't double negation. "Nothing" isn't a negative, it's a discrete quantity, even outside the realm of programming. "This quantity is not nothing." is, grammatically, the exact same as saying "This quantity is not zero." and neither is a double negative. – jmbpiano Mar 5 '15 at 23:49
1  
It's not that I don't want to disagree with the absence of truth here, but come on now. IsNot Nothing is clearly, well, overly negative. Why not write something positive and clear like HasValue? This is not a grammar test, it's coding, where the key objective is clarity. – Randy Gamage Aug 12 '15 at 22:22
    
jmbpiano: I agree it's not double negation, but it's a single negation and that's almost as ugly and not as clear as a simple positive expression. – Kaveh Hadjari Jan 5 at 18:14

I did some research on this by using different methods to assign values to a nullable int. Here is what happened when I did various things. Should clarify what's going on. Keep in mind: Nullable<something> or the shorthand something? is a class. Without help from the compiler, trying to call HasValue on a Nullable whose variable was assigned null would produce a null reference runtime error.

e.g. using

int? val = null;
bool x = val.HasValue

would produce a runtime error from calling HasValue on a null object. However, the compiler interferes for us and does monkey business with our code to prevent this.

Here is a description of some code I ran, and what output it produced in labels:

int? val = null;
lbl_Val.Text = val.ToString(); //Produced an empty string.
lbl_ValVal.Text = val.Value.ToString(); //Produced a runtime error. ("Nullable object must have a value.")
lbl_ValEqNull.Text = (val == null).ToString(); //Produced "True" (without the quotes)
lbl_ValNEqNull.Text = (val != null).ToString(); //Produced "False"
lbl_ValHasVal.Text = val.HasValue.ToString(); //Produced "False"
lbl_NValHasVal.Text = (!(val.HasValue)).ToString(); //Produced "True"
lbl_ValValEqNull.Text = (val.Value == null).ToString(); //Produced a runtime error. ("Nullable object must have a value.")
lbl_ValValNEqNull.Text = (val.Value != null).ToString(); //Produced a runtime error. ("Nullable object must have a value.")

Ok, lets try the next initialization method:

int? val = new int?();
lbl_Val.Text = val.ToString(); //Produced an empty string.
lbl_ValVal.Text = val.Value.ToString(); //Produced a runtime error. ("Nullable object must have a value.")
lbl_ValEqNull.Text = (val == null).ToString(); //Produced "True" (without the quotes)
lbl_ValNEqNull.Text = (val != null).ToString(); //Produced "False"
lbl_ValHasVal.Text = val.HasValue.ToString(); //Produced "False"
lbl_NValHasVal.Text = (!(val.HasValue)).ToString(); //Produced "True"
lbl_ValValEqNull.Text = (val.Value == null).ToString(); //Produced a runtime error. ("Nullable object must have a value.")
lbl_ValValNEqNull.Text = (val.Value != null).ToString(); //Produced a runtime error. ("Nullable object must have a value.")

All the same as before. Keep in mind that initializing with int? val = new int?(null);, with null passed to the constructor, would have produced a COMPILE time error, since the nullable object's VALUE is NOT nullable. It is only the wrapper object itself that is a class, and can therefore be null.

Likewise, we would get a compile time error from:

int? val = new int?();
val.Value = null;

not to mention that val.Value is a read-only property anyway, meaning we can't even use something like:

val.Value = 3;

but again, the compiler does more monkey business with our code so that we can do:

val = 3;

even though this would produce a compile time error with any other class than Nullable<>, since val is not the base type int that we are trying to assign to it. This is probably done by providing Nullable<> with a polymorphous implicit converter for whatever type it is initialized as (don't worry about that, so long as it works right? :)

share|improve this answer
2  
"Keep in mind: Nullable<something> or the shorthand something? is a class." This is wrong! Nullable<T> is a struct. It overloads Equals and == operator to return true when compared to null. The compiler does no fancy work for this comparison. – andrewjs Jun 9 '15 at 9:30
    
@andrewjs - You are right that it's a struct (not a class), but you are wrong that it overloads the == operator. If you type Nullable<X> in VisualStudio 2013 and F12 it, you will see that it only overloads conversion to and from X, and the Equals(object other) method. However, I think the == operator uses that method by default, so the effect is the same. I've actually been meaning to update this answer on that fact for a while now, but I'm lazy and/or busy. This comment will have to do for now :) – Perrin Larson Jun 11 '15 at 20:15
    
I did a quick check through ildasm and you are right about the compiler doing some magic; comparing a Nullable<T> object to null does in fact translate to a call to HasValue. Interesting! – andrewjs Jun 12 '15 at 10:39
1  
@andrewjs Actually, the compiler does a ton of work to optimize nullables. For example, if you assign a value to a nullable type, it will not actually be a nullable at all (e.g., int? val = 42; val.GetType() == typeof(int)). So not only is nullable a struct that can be equal to null, it also often isn't a nullable at all! :D The same way, when you box a nullable value, you're boxing int, not int? - and when the int? doesn't have a value, you get null instead of a boxed nullable value. It basically means there's rarely any overhead from using nullable properly :) – Luaan Aug 5 '15 at 9:26
    
"Without help from the compiler, trying to call HasValue on a Nullable whose variable was assigned null would produce a null reference runtime error." -- This is nonsense. Nullable<int> is a value type, not a reference type, and so it can't possibly get a null reference error. A number of comments on this page reflect this confusion, conflating "nullable" with "reference type". – Jim Balter Oct 11 '15 at 16:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.