Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class B, that extends from class A, class B overrides a class A's method:

public class ClassB extends ClassA {

    @Overrides
    protected void DoSomething() {
        super.DoSomething();
        // Some ClassB code here, called WorkB
    }
}

After that, I create a class B object, and I need do something extra in addition to what A's version in DoSomething():

ClassB objB = new ClassB() {

    @Overrides
    protected void DoSomething() {
        // I need to do something more here
    }

}

I need to know if I can do ALL of ClassA works, ClassB works, then add some other code for objB in this method? I have a solution: create a public method in ClassB, that do WorkB, then in objB, just call the method. But I want to know if there is/are another way (no matter worse or better my solution!).

EDIT: I will summarise the question so you can easily understand it:

  • Class A's doSomething method does something called WorksA.
  • Class B overrides doSomething, call super.doSomething() and some extra code, which mean it does WorksA and an extra called WorksB.
  • Object objB doSomething() method has to do WorksA, WorksB and another extra called WorksBExtra.

That's all.

share|improve this question
1  
I think you answered your own question. You got it. –  Romain Hippeau Jul 20 '11 at 11:19
    
@Romain Hippeau: That solution sudden appear in my head when I was typing this question, so I'm not sure yet. And, I want to know if there is another way :) –  DatVM Jul 20 '11 at 11:28
    
@W.N I think I didn't get the question or my simple answer is right. Are you ok with my answer below ? –  Manuel Selva Jul 20 '11 at 11:30
    
@Manuel Selva: Edited so it is easier to understand. –  DatVM Jul 20 '11 at 11:38
    
@W.N, ok so my answer is correct. –  Manuel Selva Jul 20 '11 at 11:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes just call super.doSomething() first and it will throw up until Class A and then Class B. After that you can do specific stuff.

public class A {
public void doSomething() {
    System.out.println("A, ");
}

}

public class B extends A {
public void doSomething() {
    super.doSomething();
    System.out.println("B, ");
}

}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    B b = new B() {
        @Override
        public void doSomething() {
            super.doSomething();
            System.out.println("new B");
        }
    };
    b.doSomething();
}

Outputs A, B, new B

share|improve this answer
    
His issue is that he doesn't have super.doSomething() inside his ClassB. –  Aleks G Jul 20 '11 at 11:24
    
You are wrong, read again the question. –  Manuel Selva Jul 20 '11 at 11:26
    
Ok, never mind. I read the question 3 times and understand it differently 3 times. Yes, your solution will do what (s)he needs in this case. –  Aleks G Jul 20 '11 at 11:28
    
I think super inside obj still refer to ClassA, not ClassB, so only ClassA's doSomething is called? –  DatVM Jul 20 '11 at 11:29
2  
NO. It refers to class B –  Manuel Selva Jul 20 '11 at 11:31

Your object is an instance of an anonymous subclass of ClassB, and you can override in exactly the same way:

ClassB objB = new ClassB() {

    @Override
    protected void DoSomething() {
        super.DoSomething();
        // do something more here just for this object.
    }

}

This code will first call the ClassB version of DoSomething(), which calls the ClassA version. So the net effect is to first do the ClassA stuff, then the ClassB stuff, then the stuff specific to the anonymous subclass.

I think you had the annotation wrong. It's @Override with no "s". Probably just a typo.

Also note that your DoSomething() is rather non-standard naming. You'd be better off calling it doSomething() in accordance with the way methods are usually named in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know super refers to class B, not class A. And yes, it's just typo mistakes, thank you for your advice. –  DatVM Jul 20 '11 at 11:40
1  
Yes. super always refers to the immediate superclass. If there weren't an override in B, it would find it in A, but with an override in B it will call that. –  Don Roby Jul 20 '11 at 11:43
    
So, objB is a "child" of ClassB if I understand this way? Is it correct? I thought only a class that extends other class is called "child" (which mean objB is not "child" of ClassB), and that's why I thought super refers to ClassA. –  DatVM Jul 20 '11 at 11:45
1  
objB is an instance of an anonymous subclass of ClassB. I don't like the word "child" here, but with this usage, the anonymous class would be the "child". –  Don Roby Jul 20 '11 at 11:51
    
OK, I understood it. Thank you very much. Happy coding :) –  DatVM Jul 20 '11 at 11:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.